February 27, 1911

FIRST READING.


Bill (No. 130) for the relief of Matilda Emo-Air. Hudgins.


IMPERIAL CONFERENCE.

CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LENNOX.

I desire to call the attention of the right hon. Prime Alinister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) to an item appearing in the English * Morning Post,' of the 18th February, in which they refer to the approaching Imperial Conference, and point out that many of the overseas Dominions have sent in an outline of important proposals which they propose to submit to the conference-from New Zealand 15 or 16 various resolutions looking to better communication and better carrying facilities; from Australia about the same number from South Africa, and so on. This item is headed:

Topic:   IMPERIAL CONFERENCE.
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NO SUGGESTIONS FROM CANADA.


And it says: A White Paper was issued last night containing the suggestions made by the governments of the British dominions oversea as to resolutions for discussion at the forthcoming Imperial Conferences. The main outstanding feature of the correspondence is the passive attitude adopted by Canada. She will take part in the discussion of any subject put forward by the other participants in the conference. She makes no suggestions herself. She gives a guarded welcome to suggestions looking to uniformity as far as practicable in the naturalization laws throughout the empire.



I desire to ask the Prime Minister if it is a fact that with all the important questions looming up concerning this great Dominion and its commercial and other relations with Great Britain and the empire, and with these resolutions now on file and completed, there is no suggestion nothing in the way of initiative from the Dominion of Canada.


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Mr. Speaker, it is a fact that the Dominion government has no new suggestions to make to the Imperial Conference, which' meets this year.

Topic:   NO SUGGESTIONS FROM CANADA.
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RECIPROCITY NEGOTIATIONS.

CON

Richard Blain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLAIN.

I would like to read a paragraph from a letter written by Mr. J. A. Macdonald, the present editor of the Toronto ' Globe, and published in the Stratford ' Herald,' of the 21st inst. I propose to read one paragraph of the letter, and then to ask only one question:

(1) Reciprocity had absolutely nothing to do with my going to Washington a year ago. After the close of a certain libel suit in which I was defendant I sought change and rest. On my way to Atlantic city I dropped off at Washington for a day or two. My presence there would have been unrecognized had not the newspaper men dragged me into the discussion of the American-Canadian tariff situation, then at an acute stage. Once in I made the most of it, and got good newspaper copy for the ' Globe.' I saw Aldrich, Cannon, Lodge, Dolliver, Champ Clark and Secretary Knox. On the third day President Taft sent for me. We discussed tariff matters with a great frankness. He expressed an earnest wish to meet Sir Wilfrid Laurier or some member of the Canadian government at Albany, and asked me to prepare the way. That evening I left for Ottawa. The only man who knew of these things was Ambassador Bryce, with whom I was in daily conferense. Not until I reached Ottawa did Sir Wilfrid know. So far as I am aware he knew nothing of my movements. Therefore, when Col. Hughes charged in parliament that I was the ' unofficial agent ' of the government he spoke a falsehood.

(Sgd.) J. A. MACDONALD.

La Jolia, Cal., Feb. 18, 1911.

I would like to know from (the Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier)) whether or not that was the first communication with respect to the tariff [DOT]negotiations between this government and the government at Washington.

SiT WILFRID LAURIER. The brief communication that the government had. was from the President of the United States, inviting Mr. Fielding to meet him at Albany. Mr. Macdonald is right in saying that up to the time of the interview, there had been no communication with him whatever or anybody else.

Topic:   RECIPROCITY NEGOTIATIONS.
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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

Had the communication from Mr. Taft been received befoTe Mr. Mr. LENNOX.

Macdonald's conference on his return from Washington with Sir Wilfrid Laurier here?

Topic:   RECIPROCITY NEGOTIATIONS.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I do not remember it at all; it may or it may not.

Topic:   RECIPROCITY NEGOTIATIONS.
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COMBINES ACT-UNITED SHOE MACHINERY COMPANY.

LIB

Joseph Arthur Calixte √Čthier

Liberal

Mr. ETHIER.

I wish to ask the Minister of Labour (Mr. King) whether his department has taken any action with a view to an inquiry under the Combines Investigation Act, in connection with the complaints made against the United Shoe Machinery Company?

Topic:   COMBINES ACT-UNITED SHOE MACHINERY COMPANY.
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. KING.

I have received notification from Mr. Justice Cannon of Quebec that he has granted an order directing an investigation under the Combines Investigation Act into an alleged combine on the part of the United Shoe Machinery Company, and that the documents in connection with the matter are being forwarded to the Department of Labour as soon as received, proceedings will be instituted in accordance with the provisions of the Act.

Topic:   COMBINES ACT-UNITED SHOE MACHINERY COMPANY.
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SECOND READINGS.


Bill (No. 125) respecting the Pacific, Northern and Omeniea Railway 'Company.- Mr. Smith (Nanaimo). Bill (No. 127) to incorporate the Universal Life Assurance Company of Canada.- Mr. Low. Bill .(No. 121) respecting the Globe Printing Company.-Mr. Clarke (Essex).


QUESTIONS.


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


IMMIGRATION-EXPENDITURE.

February 27, 1911