February 7, 1911

NATIONAL TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILWAY-CORRECTION OF ANSWER TO QUESTION.

FIRST READING.


Bill (No. 113) to incorporate the Dominion Development Railway Company.-Mr. Smith (Nanaimo).


BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE.

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER moved:

That from this date to the end of the session, government orders, on Wednesdays, shall have precedence immediately after questions to he put by members.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

There are, of course, a good many items of considerable importance still standing under the head of public Bills and orders. I am afraid that, if Wednesday is taken, these will be consigned to the scrap heap. Has the Prime Minister thought of that?

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I am afraid there is not much help for that circumstance. As my hon. friend is aware, all the notices of motion remaining on the list have been gone over at least eight or ten times, and many of the items under public Bills and orders have been called twice. Looking over the notices of motion, I believe that not many of them are very contentious, and I still believe and hope _we can get through public Bills and orders on Monday evening.

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CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LENNOX.

I would urge upon the Prime Minister not to cut these gentlemen off without notice. I do not know that I am right in reading this motion as taking effect forthwith?

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LIB
CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LENNOX.

To-morrow will be Wednesday. If the Prime Minister would agree that this should not go into effect until a wceek from to-morrow, I should have nothing to say against it.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Very well. At the request of my hon. friend from South Simcoe (Mr. Lennox) I will agree that this shall commence with Wednesday the 15th of February.

Motion, as amended, agreed to.

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RECIPROCITY WITH THE UNITED STATES.

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

We had intended to go on to-day with the reciprocity debate, but I arranged wiui my hon. friend the leader of the opposition (Mr. Borden,

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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM.

Before the orders of the day. are called, I wish to make correction of an answer given to a question put by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Borden, Halifax), with reference to the cost of the Transcontinental railway to December 31, 1910. The figures furnished to me yesterday represented the amount of money paid out to the end of last year, but did not include certain sums that have been paid m January, or that will be paid, but which belong to last year. The corrected fi

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SUPPLY.


House in Committee of Supply.


LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

As my hon. friend the Minister of Militia and Defence (Sir bred-erick Borden) is now present, I would invite my hon. friend from St. Anne Division, Montreal (Mr. Doherty) to repeat in his presence the objections vvhich he voiced on a previous occasion to the selection of the site for the new Montreal barracks, the particulars of which I was not able to give.

Montreal, new barracks, $100,000.

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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY.

When this item came up on the two previous occasions we understood from the Minister of Public Works that the barracks were to be constructed at Longueuil, and that one of the important purposes of this barracks was to place a unit of the permanent force there, and to provide a military school for the benefit of the Montreal district. I inquired then whether the officers who take an active interest in militia matters in Montreal had been consulted, and had approved of the location of these barracks at Montreal or what their judgment had been. For myself, while I do not undertake to pronounce a judgment on that matter, I did venture to point out that a military school situated so far away from the residences of the majority of the young men who would in all probability attend this school, was open to some objection, that it was a place difficult of access, and would hardly meet the want that has been felt in Montreal. If 1 am not mistaken, it has been found that the military school situated at St. Johns does not afford the oportunity that-was expected for the young men, who I am sure we would all be glad to see taking an active part in the operations of our militia, and who we want to see afford-

~A nrmrvrt.Ymifv of Qualifying

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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

themselves to perform their duties effec; tively. The situation of the school at St. Johns was found to be such as to prevent a large number of young men taking advantage of it, inasmuch as they are all engaged in business activities, and it is impossible for them, without great inconvenience and considerable loss, to absent themselves from the city. Now to overcome that objection it was suggested that we should have a military school in Montreal, but a military school at Longueuil can hardly be called a military school in Montreal. Individually, I am not familiar with the precise site on which it is proposed to erect these barracks, but I do know that the access from different portions of Montreal, I think I may say from those portions where the majority of those who want to use the school would come from, is not convenient or easy. If this school is to be available for the class of young men who are to attend it, I think it would be important that its courses should take the form of evening instruction, and if they do take that form, it will be exceedingly difficult, in many cases impossible for young men to go over to Longueuil early enough in the evening to have any reasonable time to devote to their lessons and get back home again at a reasonable hour. I do not oppose the erection of the barracks, but I am pointing out what I think is desirable, namely, that the minister should take the judgment of those officers in the Montreal district who know the needs and requirements of the class of young men whd, are to attend this school.

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February 7, 1911