December 14, 1910

FIRST READINGS.


Bill (No. 51) respecting the Alberta Railway and Irrigation Company.-Mr. Ma-grath. Bill (No. 52) to incorporate the Commercial Travellers' Accident Assurance Company of Canada.-Mr. Rankin. Bill (No. 53) respecting the Dominion Atlantic Railway Company.-Mr. Pickup. Bill (No. 54) respecting the E. B. Eddy Company.-Mr. Devlin. Bill (No. 55) respecting the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada.-Mr. Clarke (Essex). Bill (No. 56) to incorporate the Hudson Bay Mortgage Corporation.-Mr. Knowles. Bill (No. 57) respecting the London and Northwestern Railway Company.-Mr. Beattie.


WATER-POWERS.

?

Mr. F. D.@

MONK (Jacques Cartier) moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 49) respecting water-powers.

Topic:   WATER-POWERS.
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LIB
CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

The object of this Bill, Mr. Speaker, is to conserve as far as possible for our country, the great wealth of waterpower which we find that we possess. Since the creation of the commission on conservation a very active investigation has taken place by the commission in order to ascertain the extent of our forest, mineral, and water-power wealth. There have been different committees of that commission and the one concerning water-powers, with which I have the honour to be connected, during the first year of the existence of the commission, ascertained to a very considerable extent the amount of our water-power wealth throughout the country. The result of that investigation has been surprising and the stage that we have arrived at now is this: What can we do in order to preserve that immense source of wealth and industrial development for the country? In view of that, the present Bill has been prepared as an attempt at legislation in that direction. We have no legislation upon the alienation of this great source of wealth that I am aware of, and this Bill endeavours to surround that alienation with precautions that will ensure the maintenance of that wealth and its utilization, not for a select few, but for the public in general.

It provides, amongst other things, that when alienation has been decided upon,

either upon the petition of an individual or upon the action of the government, the question is submitted to the Conservation Commission in order that it shall furnish suggestions to the government as to the value of the water-power and the conditions most satisfactory for the country and for the public under which the alienation should take place. No alienation can be made otherwise than by lease which, in its duration, cannot exceed fifty years. There is no final alienation. When the Conservation Commission has made its report upon the different points of interest mentioned in the Bill, the government advertises the water-power for sale by auction under the conditions prescribed. Five years before the lease expires the government intimates to the lessee what it considers to be a reasonable condition for the renewal of the lease and within a certain space of time the lessee must state whether he accepts the condition or not. Otherwise, the waterpower site is sold at auction again under leasehold tenure and the former lessee is indemnified for his improvements or expenses. The government has power to pass rules and regulations regulating the administration of the law, and the Commission on Conservation itself has power to pass rules and regulations binding upon the departments and binding upon the lessee, obligating him to conform to certain conditions and all these, when approved of by the Governor in Council and published in the ' Canada Gazette,' become law. These are the principal dispositions of this new Bill.

There is a final section which says that all alienations hitherto made by the government of water-powers where the lessee or the grantee, under whatever title, has not conformed to the conditions of the alienation, either by failure to pay rent or to develop, or to conform in other respects to the conditions of the instrument of alienation, will, after the coming into force of this Act, become void absolutely, and the government can take possession once more of the powers and deal with them under the disposition of the new law. The Conservation Commission meets at the beginning of the month of January and this Bill cannot come up for the second reading until after that meeting and until after the government has had time to consider it. It seems to me that it is absolutely necessary for us, in face of the inventory we have made showing the extent of our wealth in that respect to make some provision to prevent any wasteful alienation of this source of wealth.

Topic:   WATER-POWERS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. FRANK OLIVER (Minister of the Interior).

Mr. Speaker, I think my hon. friend (Mr. Monk) is somewhat in error in stating that there is no legislation on this subject. If my hon. friend will refer to the Dominion Lands Act, 1908, he will find legislative provisions there for dealing

with water-powers under the jurisdiction of the Dominion government, and based upon that legislative authority, granted by parliament in 1908, regulations have been provided for dealing with water-powers under the control of the Dominion which have been availed of to a very considerable extent, and which, I think, on careful examination will be found to have served the public interest to the fullest possible extent that my hon. friend can suggest in his Bill.

Topic:   WATER-POWERS.
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CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

I have not recently seen the account referred to by my hon. friend, but this much I know, that it is very incomplete indeed, and that the regulations that have been founded upon that Act are felt by those who have had any experience of water-powers to be absolutely impracticable. At any rate, the object of this Act is to bring into close contact the government and the Conservation Commission, which it has created, and to make that Commission of some use in carrying out the design of the government in creating it. The Act to which my hon. friend refers, will be found to be quite incomplete.

Topic:   WATER-POWERS.
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LIB

Frank Oliver (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I wish to correct my hon. friend when he says that the regulations existing at present are incomplete or impracticable. As a matter of fact, an expenditure of millions of dollars is now under way under authority of these regulations and in accordance with their provisions.

Topic:   WATER-POWERS.
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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


QUESTIONS.


(The questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


CANADIAN NAVAL SERVICE-IMPROVED BRISTOL TYPE.

CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK:

As regards the cruisers of the improved Bristol type about to be constructed by the government, what, respectively, will be their displacement, length, beam, draught, indicated horse-power, estimated cost, protection, arrrfament, estimated speed, coal capacity and complement ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NAVAL SERVICE-IMPROVED BRISTOL TYPE.
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LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of the Naval Service; Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. BRODEUR:

The details of those ships have been supplied to the Department of Naval Service by the admiralty with the understanding that they would be kept confidential.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NAVAL SERVICE-IMPROVED BRISTOL TYPE.
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IMPERIAL REALTY CO.-PAYMENTS FOR LIGHTING.

CON

Mr. SHARPE. (Ontario):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. When was the last cheque paid to the Imperial Realty Company for lighting the Woods and Canadian buildings for the year ending March 17, 1910, and what was the amount of the payment?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   IMPERIAL REALTY CO.-PAYMENTS FOR LIGHTING.
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LIB

Mr. OLIVER. (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

2. Why was this amount paid over to the Imperial Realty Company when the investigation in the Public Accounts Committee in March and April disclosed the alleged fact that the company were illegally claiming large sums from the government, and had received a large sum to which under their contract they were not legally entitled?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   IMPERIAL REALTY CO.-PAYMENTS FOR LIGHTING.
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LIB

Mr. PUGSLEY: (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

1. April 18, 1910.

Militia (Woods) building $1,243.51 Canadian building 1,672.56-$2,916.07

2. The investigation was not completed until May 2, 1910.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   IMPERIAL REALTY CO.-PAYMENTS FOR LIGHTING.
Permalink

OTTAWA MUNICIPAL PLANT-LIGHTING OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

December 14, 1910