December 5, 1910

UNITED STATES DESERTER.

L-C

Mr. HUGHES :

Liberal-Conservative

1. Has the attention of the Minister of Justice been drawn to the following:

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L-C

U.S. DESERTER CAUGHT IN ONTARIO.


Niagara Falls, Ont., Nov. 16.-^(Special.)- Provincial police inspector Mains to-day arrested John McCormick, wanted at Fort Nia-agara for desertion from the United States Army. He wore civilian clothes, but his uniform was recovered in a second-hand store. He was turned over to the American authorities to-night. 2. Are ' deserters' from either the army of the United States to Canada, or from that of Canada to the United States subject to extradition? 3. Under what law was this man sent back?


LIB

Mr. AYLESWORTH : (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

1. Not otherwise than by the putting of this question.

2. No.

3. I am not able to say.

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PEAT GAS.

L-C
LIB

William Templeman (Minister of Mines; Minister of Inland Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. TEMPLEMAN.

This will require too long an answer. Let it stand as a notice of motion.

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WINNIPEG INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.

CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE :

Has the government reached a conclusion as to the assistance they propose to give the International Exposition it is contemplated by the people of Winnipeg and the west to hold in Winnipeg in 1914? If so, would they make an announcement to that effect so as to serve notice to all interested parties or countries that the exposition is to take place, and the date thereof?

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

The government have not yet come to any conclusion on this matter.

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PRINTING BUREAU INQUIRY.

CON

Mr. TAYLOR :

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. How many civil servants of the Department of Printing and Stationery have been dismissed, suspended or superannuated since the 1st of May last to date?

2. What are the names of the persons, dismissed, suspended and superannuated, respectively ? _

3. What superannuation allowance is to be paid annually to the different persons, if any, so superannuated?

4. Is it the intention of the government to reinstate any or all of those persons, if any, who have been suspended?

5. Is it the intention of the government to reinstate any or all of those persons, if any, who have been dismissed?

6. Is it the intention of the government to superannuate any or all of those persons, if any, who have been suspended or dismissed?

7. What, if any, persons who have been dismissed from the Department of Printing and Stationery have been employed in some of the other departments of the government, and what are the names, if any, of such per sons?

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LIB

Mr. MURPHY : (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

1. Five.

2. Wm. McMahon, superannuated ; R. E. Cook, dismissed ; J. G. A. Harwood, dismissed ; A. E. Chamberlain, resigned ; John Gooden, dismissed.

3. The only person entitled to a superannuation allowance was Mr. Wm. McMahon. Under the Act this superannuation allowance, based on his average salary for the past three years, namely, $2,887.50 is $1,155 per annum.

R. E. Cook, J. G. A. Harwood, A. E. Chamberlain and John Gooden were not entitled to superannuation. They were appointed to the Civil Service after the first of July, 1898, and were subject to the provisions of the Retirement Fund.

Their contributions to the Retirement Fund were as follows :

R. E. Cook $571 23J. G. A. Harwood

233 89A. E. Chamberlain

255 17John Gooden

102 64

Mr. Harwood applied for and obtained the $233.89 which was due him from the Retirement Fund.

Messrs. Cook, Chamberlain and Gooden have not yet applied for the sums respectively due them from the Retirement Fund.

4. None now under suspension. [DOT]

5. No.

6. Answered by reply to question No. 3.

7. The government is not aware that any of the persons so dismissed have been employed in any departments of the government, but if names be supplied further inquiry will be made.

MANITOBA BOUNDARY QUESTION. Mr. STAPLES:

1. Did the right honourable the premier, on the evening of July 12, 1910, at the city of Winnipeg, in a public meeting give utterance to the following words or words of similar import?-

You have been told that I am an enemy of Manitoba. You have been told that I don't want to give justice to you. I have written to Mr. Roblin and I repeat here, let him come to Ottawa where he can discuss with me what is fair and just and see if we can agree upon what is proper either in land or in money for the increased territory of Manitoba. What more can we do? If the province of Manitoba continues to be on the map a postage stamp, the fault will not be mine, the fault will be his.

2. Has there been any correspondence between the government or Premier of Canada,

23i

and the government or Premier of Manitoba since the 12th of January, 1910, with reference to the Manitoba boundary question?

3. Has the right honourable, the First Minister, invited the Premier of Manitoba or the government of Manitoba since the 12th January, 1910, to a conference for the purpose of discussing the boundary question?

4. Has the government or Premier of Manitoba since the said date requested an interview to discuss this question?

5. Has there been any discussion between the two governments or the Premiers of the respective governments since the said date in regard to the Manitoba boundary question ?_

6. If there has been no discussion, what is the cause of the delay?

7. Does the province of Manitoba continue to be on the map still a postage stamp? If so, whose fault is it?

8. Can the right honourable, the First Minister, state that he is willing to concede either in land or in money for the increased territory of Manitoba?

9. Has the right honourable, the First Minister, or' the government intimated to the government of Manitoba what he or they are willing to concede in land or money?

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?

An hon. MEMBER.

The question is not starred.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

The rule is that if an hon. member wants an oral answer he puts a star to his question. If he does not he puts no star, and in that case the minister will send his answer. But a member may think sometimes it is an advantage to have the question published and the government may think it an advantage to have the answer published, so that all questions should be called, whether starred or not starred. The reply to this question is as follows:-

1. The Prime Minister gave utterance to the words therein mentioned or words of a similar import.

2 and 3. Yes. The following correspondence was exchanged between the Prime Minister and the premier of the province:- Province of Manitoba.

Premier's Office,

Winnipeg, Manitoba,

October 17, 1910.

My dear Sir Wilfrid,-

Re Terms of Extension of Manitoba Boundaries.

Although I have as yet received no reply to my letter of January 8, 1910, I feel the matter of the future development and prosperity of this province demand that I should again urge and request you to give an answer to our proposals as to the terms upon which the territory already agreed upon should be transferred to Manitoba.

I have read carefully all your published statements on the question while you were in the west. I noted your public suggestion that I should go to Ottawa and enter into conference. As to this, I am willing to-day, to-morrow or any day you name to visit Ottawa.

My sense of what is right and just for the welfare of the province will compel me to

simply repeat and ask, as onr delegates, Messrs. Rogers and Campbell, asked, for tbe same equality of treatment as is enjoyed by our sister provinces. From some of your published statements you are reported as having said that you never made any offer at all, and that Messrs. Rogers and Campbell were mistaken. However, be this as it may, surely the time has now arrived when you should be in a position to state what terms you are prepared to recommend to your parliament for acceptance.

You have in your possession our proposal which we regard as fair and just. If you are not prepared to accept them, and will undertake to make an alternative proposition, 1 will undertake and endeavour to meet you in every possible way so long as your proposition will have for its basis equality of treatment. Anything short of equality will mean the placing of Manitoba in a subordinate position towards he.r sister provinces in confederation. Possibly you may think I do not represent public opinion in this province in asking for this equality of treatment.

Let me go a step further and say that if you will make your proposition and it turns out to be such as I cannot accept, I will with your approval undertake to submit the two propositions directly to the people of this province for their consideration and decision on the principle of the initiative and referendum.

If, however, you are prepared to offer us terms of equality of treatment with the other provinces, which we have so repeatedly urged, I will at once accept, and at the approaching sessions of both parliaments all these matters might be agreed to and confirmed by legislation.

An early reply will be greatly appreciated. Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) R. P. ROBLIN.

To the Right Hon.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier, G.C.M.G.,

Prime Minister,

Ottawa, Ontario.

Prime Minister's Office, Canada,

Ottawa 22nd October, 1910.

My deal' Mr. Roblin,-In answer to yours of the 17th instant, I beg to say that I will be very happy to meet you and to resume negotiations on the question of the extension of the Manitoba boundaries, at any time that may be convenient to you.

With reference to your letter of the 8th of January last, which you say remained unanswered by me, I have to tell you frankly that in my opinion my part of the correspondence was ended, as your letter was simply a repetition of a suggestion which had been made by you in two previous communications, and which I had felt compelled to decline. I noticed that in some of your public utterances, you construed my not continuing the correspondence as an act of discourtesy. This is an opinion which I cannot entertain. At all events, I respectfully disclaim any such intention.

Believe me, dear Mr. Roblin,

Yours very sincerely,

(Sd.) WILFRID LAURIER. The Hon. R. P. Roblin,

Premier's Office,

Winnipeg, Man.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Province of Manitoba.

Premier's Office,

October 27, 1910.

My dear Sir Wilfrid,-As requested by you in yours of October 22, I will visit Ottawa in the near future to discuss with you the terms upon which the boundaries of Manitoba may be extended.

With assurances of my personal regards, Yours very respectfully,

(Sd.) R. P. ROBLIN. Right Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, G.C.M.G., Ottawa, Ontario.

4. Yes. In the following telegram:

Canadian Pacific Railway Company's Telegraph.

New York, N.Y., Nov. 21, 1910. Sir Wilfrid Laurier,

Ottawa.

Will be in Ottawa to-morrow to resume discussion boundary matter. 11.35 a.m.

(Sd.). R. P. ROBLIN.

. 5 and 6. There was an interview between the Premier of Manitoba and the Prime Minister on the 25tli of November, 1910. At that interview it was suggested by the Prime Minister to the Premier of Manitoba that, as the "question to be settled according to the resolution of the 13th of July, 1908, was the financial terms to be granted to the province in consequence of the extension of boundaries, it would not be advisable to discuss the same then and there on account of the absence of the Minister of Finance, but that negotiations would be resumed after his return to Ottawa.

7. If the province of Manitoba still continues to be a postage stamp on the map, the blame is not with the present government of Canada.

8 and 9. To these two questions the Prime Minister has to answer that he is prepared to discuss them upon the line of the resolution adopted by this House on the 13th of July, 1908.

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LEVIS DRY-DOCK.

CON

Mr. MACDONELL:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is the statement contained in the 'Navy' for November, 1910, attributed to Sir Robert Perks, correct, as follows:-

' Alluding to the new dry-dock scheme at Levis, opposite Quebec, Sir Robert mentioned that plans and detailed drawings had now been lodged with the Dominion Government, in accordance with the Dry-Dock Subsidy Act of May last, and the Joint Stock Company headed by the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Allan Line had been registered in Canada for carrying out the work. The dock, said Sir Robert, will be of the largest type a thousand feet, long, and will be entitled to the subsidy on the first scale guaranteed under the Dominion Dry-Dock Act of 3| per cent of four millions of dollars for thirty-five years. The Company's financial arrangements are all concluded, subject to the assent of the Dominion Government, and all the

plans and schedules which were lodged with the government on September 28, are now under their consideration.'

2. If all of the above is not correct, in what respect is it incorrect?

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December 5, 1910