November 24, 1910

DRUMMOND AND ARTHABASKA CORRESPONDENCE.

CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

I beg leave to lay on the table of the House the three, letters referred to in the debate now going on, being communications with the officers of the depart-, ment, and the answers thereto.

Topic:   DRUMMOND AND ARTHABASKA CORRESPONDENCE.
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PHOSPHORUS POISONING IN MATCH MANUFACTURE.


Mr. KING moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 10) to prohibit the manufacture and importation of matches made with white phosphorus. He said: It has been found from experience that evils of a serious nature arise from the use of white phosphorus in the manufacture of matches. The work people not infrequently contract a very painful and loathsome disease known as phosphorus necrosis, popularly referred to as ' fossy jaw.' As a consequence several countries of Europe have taken active measures to prohibit the manufacture of matches made with phosphorus. Suitable substitutes have been found for that ingredient. The Bill which I now introduce is similar to a measure passed by the English parliament in December, 1908. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT SOCIETIES.


Mr. MONK moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 11) respecting co-operative credit



societies. He said: The House is already familiar with the objects of this Bill. This year, as well as last year, the principle of the measure is divided into two parts. One feature of it last year was in charge of the hon. member for Brantford (Mr. Harris), which provided for co-operation in all fields of activity; this year I am only asking for legislation regarding t|he co-operation of credit societies. Both these Bills, after passing through the primary stages here, went to the Committee of Banking and Commerce. The committee threw out the Bill applying to co-operation generally, there was strong opposition manifested against the Bill (No. 26) as it was numbered last year. The Act respecting co-operative credit societies was very carefully examined by the Committee on Banking and Commerce, who reported it favourably, but it could not receive its third reading in this House because there was no time for it. I may say that the Bill as I now present it, is the Bill which was considered and carefully revised by the Banking Committee. Its operation would be under the direction of the hon. Secretary of State. Last year he looked into it and examined it with care, and his able assistant, Mr. Mulvey, made several changes in it in order to make it applicable throughout the Dominion. I sincerely hope that this year the House will pass this measure, as it meets with the approval of a very large number of people. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENTS.


Mr. BEAUPARLANT moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 12) to amend the Civil Service Act. He said: This Bill was introduced and explained by me last session, but was not pressed through the House. I may remind the House that the object of this Bill is to permit the garnishment of a certain share of the salary of any indebted public officer of any class or grade. Every one will readily admit that it is only fair that all debtors as well as all creditors should be treated alike, and be put on a similar footing. Under present conditions, the wages of a day labourer earning, perhaps only $30 a month, and such earning the result of painful labour, are subject to garnishment ; while the wages of civil servants and public officials, although they are much higher and earned much more easily, are not subject to attachment. I contend that this discrimination is out of place in a democratic country and under a Liberal government. Let us either put an end to the privilege of a creditor seizing a small salary, or let us extend that privilege to large as well as small salaries, to public officials as well as other persons. I would have pressed this Bill at the end of last session, but I was Mr. MONK. prevented from doing so by personal reasons. My object last session was merely to call attention to the anomaly and to direct the attention of the House and the public thereto. This session I present it at the beginning of the session, and I intend to push it through, if the House will approve of it. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


DRUMMOND-ARTHABASKA-

PRIVILEGE.

CON

George Halsey Perley (Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PERLEY.

Before the orders of the day are called, I would like to say a word on a personal matter. Yesterday the Minister of Marine and Fisheries (Mr. Brodeur), when speaking of the late election in Drum-mond-Arthabaska, said, as stated on page 165 of the ' Hansard ':-

If my hon. friend from Argenteuil (Mr. Perley) were here, perhaps he could give us some explanation of where the money came from.

Unfortunately, I was not in the House at the time, and I take this opportunity of denying absolutely and unequivocally having had anvthing to do, directly or indirectly, with the election in Drummond-Artha-baska. More than that, I desire to say that I know of none of my acquaintances, or of any people who live in this part of the country, having had anything to do with it.

I further would like to say, Mr. Speaker, that although I am not the keeper of the conscience of the hon. minister I should think it was a very extraordinary thing for any person to do to put forth an insinuation of this kind without the shadow of a shade of foundation.

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LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of the Naval Service; Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. BRODEUR.

I was simply asking for some information from the hon. gentleman.

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Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE.
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CANADIAN NAVAL SERVICE.

CON

Wilfrid Bruno Nantel

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NANTEL.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to call the attention of the government to the following article that I read in the Ottawa ' Evening Journal ' of Wednesday, November 23:-

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CRUISER IS BEING BUILT IN BRITAIN FOR CANADA.


This Fact, now public, does not Coincide with Statement that Ships will he Built in this Country. British publications devoted to naval and military subjects continue to assert that a cruiser is being built in Great Britain for the Canadian navy. The latest to do so is the United Service Magazine, which in its November issue contains the following paragraph ; 'The armoured cruisers, 'New Zealand ' and ' Australia,' building for service in the Pacific, will displace 18,800 tons, and will be' sisters to the ' Indefatigable.' Orders have recently been placed for a protected cruiser for the Australian, Canadian and New Zealand services.' This repeated assertion that a protected cruiser, that is, a ship of the Bristol class, is actually about to be constructed in Great Britain for the Canadian navy hardly consorts with the declarations that all the ships will be built in Canada. Is there any truth in that statement, and what is the truth?


LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of the Naval Service; Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. BRODEUR.

I may say, in answer to my hon. friend (Mr. Nantel), that this statement was brought to my attention some days ago, and I then stated to the press that it was not contemplated by the government to have these ships built outside of Canada. On the contrary, it is the policy of the department, when tenders are asked for, that these ships shall be built in Canada.

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ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.


House resumed adjourned debate on the motion of Mr. McGiverin for an Address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the motion of Mr. Monk in amendment thereto.


November 24, 1910