May 3, 1910

CON

Edward Arthur Lancaster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LANCASTER.

As to subsection 3, is not this a rather harsh regulation that the Governor in Council shall fix the amount that is to be paid for these works that are to be confiscated or expropriated? The subsection states that the value of the works and property shall be fixed and determined by the Governor in Council upon the recommendation of the Minister ol Mr. HENDERSON.

Public Works based upon a report of the chief engineer of the Department of Public Works before the agreement for construction is entered into. Is it intended that the expropriation shall be arbitrarily determined by the Governor in Council -without the company who owns the property having an opportunity to appeal to an independent tribunal like the Exchequer Court or any other institution to settle the dispute. The information of the Governor in Council might in his belief be correct and yet greatly unfair to the people who own these dry-docks. .

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   DRY-DOCK SUBSIDIES.
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

I think my hon. friend has a misconception of this clause. It does not contemplate expropriation of any company's property. This is to enable a company voluntarily to come and make a proposal to the government to enlarge its dock. It is not contemplated that the government or anybody else shall expropriate the property. If they do not want the dock enlarged things will remain as they are. It will be an entirely voluntary matter to be adjusted between the company and the government.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   DRY-DOCK SUBSIDIES.
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CON

Edward Arthur Lancaster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LANCASTER.

It is a sort of bonus on a percentage basis?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   DRY-DOCK SUBSIDIES.
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

Yes, the subsidy is on the basis of 31 per cent for 35 years on a first-class dock, 31 per cent for 25 years on a second-class dock, and 3 per cent for 20 years on the smaller docks.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   DRY-DOCK SUBSIDIES.
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CON

Edward Arthur Lancaster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LANCASTER.

This is merely for the purpose of computing the value of the property?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   DRY-DOCK SUBSIDIES.
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

It is for the purpose of determining the value of the old work. Let us take the case of a dock that has been built for some years and is now inadequate for the larger vessels. If the company desires to enlarge that dock it may have the benefit of the largest subsidy for the longer term, but we will have to fix the value of the old work in determining the total cost That is the purpose of that clause.

Bill reported, read the third time, and passed.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   DRY-DOCK SUBSIDIES.
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BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -


Bill (No. 231) respecting bounties on iron and steel made in Canada-Mr. Fielding-read the second time, and House went into-committee thereon. Mr. SPROLTLE, Will the hon. minister explain this Bill? .


LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

My hon. friend was not here last evening when I explained that the payment of most of the bounties on iron and steel will expire on the 31st of December next- by the effluxion

of time, but there is no fixed time for the termination of the bounty on steel rods used in the manufacture of wire in Canada, and we thought it well to. introduce a Bill fixing the date. As there has been no previous notice,, we fix' the time at six months later than the date at which the other bounties expire, that is, the 30th of June, 1911, when these bounties on steel rods shall cease, provided that we may continue to make payment on any rods made prior to that date.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

Will that be the end of; the bounties?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

Yes, except one on electric smelting, which expires in a year or two later; but to the best of my knowledge, that has never been used at all.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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CON

John Dowsley Reid

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. D. REID.

It seems very strange-that the Finance Minister should be introducing such important Bills at this late stage of the session, when we have no opportunity of going into them at all. A Bill' was introduced here to-day and put through that had not even been printed.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

The Bill is a mere reproduction of resolutions which have been on the order paper for a considerable time.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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CON

John Dowsley Reid

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. D. REID.

Then there is the Combines Bill, as well as a number of others. We have been here for six months, but the government has not brought these Bills before us until the last four or five days. In another session I hope they will brings their Bills forward at an earlier stage of the session. This is not the first time we have had this played on U3.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

The only suggestion I can offer is that on some of those occasions when hon. gentlemen feel disposed to take up a day on some matter which we in our erroneous judgment do not consider important, we take time instead for the consideration of government Bills. These Bills have been on the order paper for some, time, and if they have not been taken up, it has been because the time has been otherwise occupied-whether wisely or not is a matter of which hon. members can judge.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
Permalink
CON

John Dowsley Reid

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. D. REID.

The hon. gentleman brings up estimates in the early stages of the session and leaves these important Bills to the last. If these Bills had been fully discussed, they would probably be in better shape than they are now. Does the hon. minister contend that the Combines Bill or the Insurance Bill should be left til! within three or four days of the end of the session? I, for one, do not think so. He is now trying to justify that action.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

How would my hon. friend keep the balance? There are only a certain number of hours in the day. There

has not been a day from the beginning of the session that the order paper has not been full, not a day that the government had not its business ready and pressing, and sometimes, when we wanted to work a little later, hon. gentlemen opposite said we had done a good day's work and should adjourn. This has been a busy, active session, and the government has at all times been ready to push forward its business. As to distinguishing between one item and another, my hon. friend speaks of the estimates. We will be told by and by that estimates are going through in the last hours of the session. It is hard to judge which is the most important; they are all important and we are trying to press them forward.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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CON

John Allister Currie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. A. CURRIE.

Is it the intention of the government to add a duty to take the place of the bounties that are removed?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

We certainly have no such intention at present; what may come in the future I cannot say. The future will have to take care of itself on that point.

On the preamble,

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN.

Does the minister think that the retirement of these bounties will interfere with the building of steel ships in Canada?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TRADE RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   BOUNTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. -
Permalink

May 3, 1910