March 30, 1910

LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

I stated a moment ago that I had various interviews last year, and in 1908 with the ex-Postmaster General Mr. Buxton. I see that he ha3 been promoted since. Mr. Buxton entered into negotiations with me immediately before the

COMMONd

general elections wliich took place this winter in England. I think I would then have succeeded in obtaining from the British government an authoritative statement that such concurrent legislation would be brought forward, but I was told by Mr. Buxton that in view of the difficulties arising out of the political situation in England he could not give me the promise that this legislation would be brought about during the present session. He did not know how the government would fare after the elections, and he could not make that promise, but I received from him the assurance that the matter would be taken up seriously by the government.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT-CONTROL OF CABLE RATES.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

Is that the reason that it is provided that the Act shall come into force by proclamation?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT-CONTROL OF CABLE RATES.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

Yes. I find the letter which I received from Mr. Buxton on November 28, 1909, to which I referred a moment ago as regards the assurance given me by him:

~ T . November 26, 1909.

Dear Lemieux,-I am glad to have the further opportunity of discussing with Lord otrathcona and yourself the very important question of cable rates between the Dominion and this country.

Unfortunately, the present moment does not appear to be one in which the question could be very satisfactorily considered.

Since you left Canada a political crisis has arisen over here, and a general election early *n the year appears to be inevitable. We were X think, all agreed that such a moment would not be an opportune one on which to enter into negotiations with the cable companies tor the reduction of rates, or to deal with the question in any other way. A government under these circumstances could not speak or a

I hope that later, when the political atmosphere has cleared, it will be possible to enter on a serious and practical discussion on the subject, such as that which was suggested for last spring but which was postponed.

Yours very truly,

wu tt (S"dT->

SYDNEY BUXTON,

ihe Hon. Kodolpiie Lemiecx, K.C.

I discussed with Mr. Buxton the plan outlined in this Bill.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT-CONTROL OF CABLE RATES.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPBOULE.

It looks pretty hazy now. '

Bill reported, read the third time, and passed.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT-CONTROL OF CABLE RATES.
Permalink

TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.


Bill (No. 105) to amend the Telegraphs Act-Mr. Lemieux-read second time and House went into committee thereon. On section 2,


CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPBOULE.

Does this require concurrent legislation?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

No.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
CON

William Wright

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WRIGHT.

What is the reason for postponing the coming into force of this Bill?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

Its provisions would require concurrent legislation in Great Britain.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

The minister answered me a moment ago that it did not.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

We can, of course, bring the Act into force without concurrent regulations with regard to cables which are transmitted to a point in England, but it would probably not bind them as effectively.

Bill reported, read the third time, and passed.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink

MILITIA PENSION ACT-AMENDMENT.


House went into committee to consider the following proposed resolution: Resolved, that it is expedient to amend the Militia Pension Act, chapter 42 of the Revised Statutes, 1906, as follows By inserting the following section immediately after section 6 thereof:- 6A. Time served in the Royal Northwest Mounted Police may also be included in the term of service of an officer for the purposes of this Act. 2. In such case the yearly deduction of five per cent upon average pay under this Act from any pension shall be reduced by the average yearly deduction from the officer's salary or pay as a police officer made under and for the purposes of Part II. of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police Act, or made under and for the purposes of the Civil Service Superannuation Act, or under Part I. of the Civil Service Superannuation and Retirement Act. 6B. The following times may also be in-' eluded in the term of service of an officer for the purposes of this Act: (a) Time served with the military forces in South Africa in any one or more of the years 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1902, and the time during which the officer was invalided but remained on full pay on account of wounds, injuries or disease suffered or contracted on such service: (b) Time served by an officer of the Canadian militia with the South African Constabulary ; (c) Time served with the third (special service) battalion of the Royal Canadian regiment of infantry at Halifax; and (d) Time served with the Yukon field force in any one or more of the years 1898, 1899 and 1900. (e) Half the time served in the active militia other than the force, if he has served at least ten years in the force: Provided, however, that the time to be credited to an officer under this paragraph for active militia service shall in no case exceed ten years; and provided further than if an officer's pension is increased by reason of this paragraph, then, in addition to the deductions mentioned in section 8 of this Act, such pension shall be subject to an annual deduction for a number of years equal to the number of years added €013 to his service under the authority of this paragraph, such deduction to be equivalent to five per cent of the pay which the officer was receiving at the time of his retirement from the force. By adding at the end of subsection 2 of section 12 of the said Act the words: and in the case of such non-commissioned officers and men as have been or may hereafter be transferred from His Majesty's regular forces to the permanent force under arrangements made between His Majesty's government and His Majesty's Canadian government as to the pensioning of such non-commissioned officers and men.' By adding to the said section 12 the following subsection:- 3. The following times may also be included in the term of service of a militiaman for the purposes of this Act:- (a) Time served with the military forces in South Africa in any one or more of the years 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1902; (b) Time served with the South African Constabulary; (c) Time served with the third (special service) battalion of the Royal Canadian regiment of infantry at Halifax; (d) Time served with the Yukon field force in any one or more of the years 1898, 1899 and 1900; and, (e) Time served in the employment of the government of Canada in connection with the militia stores of Canada prior to the organization. of the ordnance stores corps.-Sir Frederick Borden. Mr. 3PROULE. This will require some explanation. ,


LIB

Frederick William Borden (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal

Sir FREDERICK BORDEN (Minister of Militia and Defence).

Paragraph 6a refers to time served in the Royal Northwest Mounted Police. That force has a Pension Act similar to that of the permanent'force, and this is simply to facilitate an exchange from one corps to the other, so that if an officer who has served in the Mounted Police, should join the permanent force, the time he had served in the Mounted Police, and for which he had contributed would count in the militia. 6 (b) and the following paragraphs are intended to allow officers who served in the military service in South Africa or with the Constabulary in South Africa, or with the regiment which served at Halifax, to relieve the British garrisons there, and allow them to go to South Africa, or in the 200 men who served in the Yukon field force for two years, to count the time they served in that way in estimating their pension. Last, and perhaps more important that all others, it Is proposed now to allow any officer of the active militia who becomes an officer of the permanent force, and who serves in the permanent force ten years to count half the time he might have served with the active militia, not however, to exceed ten years. Thus if he had served thirty years in the active militia before becoming a permanent force officer, he could only count ten years, just

as if he had served twenty years. If he had served ten years he could count five years. This is thought to be desirable to encourage a better class of officers who have served in the active militia, and received - valuable experience there to come into the permanent force. It will be to the public advantage very often to take from the active militia an officer who has had the advantage of serving in that body. At present we cannot get these officers unless they are wealthy men to come into the permanent force late in life because there is no chance for them to get a pension. A man must have served twenty years in the permanent force in oTder to receive a pension. A man of forty-five who comes from the active militia into the permanent force cannot serve that length of time, so that officers of the active militia are not very desirous of going into the permanent force under existing conditions. We propose to improve the conditions in order to have the advantage of getting a few of the best officers of the active militia into the permanent force, and we think it will have a tendency to bring the two forces into better relations with each other. Such an officer coming into the permanent force from the active militia, we will say with a maximum of ten years credited to him, that is to say twenty years in the active militia, would pay, when the time comes that he would be entitled t-o a pension, his 5 per cent into the treasury for the whole of the ten years he had served in the active militia on the pay which he receives at the time he is pensioned. That is to say that 5 per cent would be deducted from his pension. That is upon the largest amount of pay of which he is in receipt, and it has been calculated that the loss to the treasury will be little if anything. In regard to this pension law as it applies to the permanent force, after ten years experience, it is just about self-sustaining, and there is not likely to be any very considerable deficiency even after this clause has been introduced into the law.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   MILITIA PENSION ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES.

In subsection (b) and the following sections, the intention is that while a man must be an officer at the time he is pensioned, the time he served in any capacity in the forces enumerated shall be counted.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   MILITIA PENSION ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
LIB

Frederick William Borden (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal

Sir FREDERICK BORDEN.

That is the intention. If a good man, say a sergeant in the active militia went into the permanent force, and became a warrant officer or an officer, the time he had served in the active militia would count.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   MILITIA PENSION ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
CON

Thomas George Wallace

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WALLACE.

I would move that another subsection be added to be called subsection (f):

The time served by an officer of the Canadian militia as pay clerk in any military district prior to the 31st of July, 1909.

That is when the pay clerks were taken into the army pay corps.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   MILITIA PENSION ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink
L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES.

Were they not on the list of active militia before that?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-TARIFF NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   MILITIA PENSION ACT-AMENDMENT.
Permalink

March 30, 1910