March 2, 1910

L-C

John Herron

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HERRON:

Is the Postmaster General aware that a paper ailed ' Cotton's Weekly,' published at Cowansville, P.Q., claims that it is being unjustly discriminated against in the matter of excessive postal charges? If so, what grounds are there for such a claim?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   'COTTON'S WEEKLY.'
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

A communication has been received from the publisher of ' Cotton's Weekly ' respecting the rate of postage chargeable on copies of his publication. There has been no discrimination, and, in the view of the department, no ground for complaint exists. I might explain further: The department was informed that the publisher of ' Cotton's Weekly ' had sent various bundles of his paper to different post offices addressed to other than regular subscribers. It appears that the postmaster of Cowansville, instead of collecting postage at the transient rate of one cent per four ounces, allowed such bundles to go through at the bulk rate of one-quarter of one cent per pound. The department has contended that persons who subscribe for fifty or one hundred, or a similar number of copies, of

but a single issue cannot be regarded as regular subscribers, and, therefore, that such copies can only be transmitted by post at the transient rate of one cent per four ounces, or fraction thereof, to each separate address. The publisher has recently written resenting the action taken, and a reply dealing fully with his inquiry is being sent to him to-day, to the effect that he is not in any manner being discriminated against, but is enjoying the same privileges as all other publishers, and not in any way knowingly treated differently.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   'COTTON'S WEEKLY.'
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NEW BRUNSWICK MAIL ROUTE.

CON

Mr. DANIEL:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. When were tenders called for the Mill-edgeville-Holderville mail route in New Brunswick ?

2. Who were the tenderers, at what prices did they tender, and who got the contract?

3. Was the contract given to the lowest tenderer? If not, why not?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NEW BRUNSWICK MAIL ROUTE.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

Per annum.

1. February 19, 1909.

2. (a)Joseph M. Sleep $636

William Sleep 690

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NEW BRUNSWICK MAIL ROUTE.
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?

Thomas L.

Martin 690

Edgar Miller 700

John Harrity 707

H. A. Currie 800

(b) Mr. Thomas L. Martin.

3. The contract was awarded to the lowest tenderer, but he failed to provide the necessary security and the department was obliged to set his tender aside.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   NEW BRUNSWICK MAIL ROUTE.
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STEAMER ' HUDSON.'

CON

Mr. DANIEL:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has the government or anv department thereof recently purchased a steamer in St. J ohn, called the ' Hudson ' ?

2. If so, what was the price paid, and for what purpose is she to he used?

3. What are the dimensions and tonnage' of this steamer?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   STEAMER ' HUDSON.'
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LIB

Mr. TEMPLEMAN: (Minister of Mines; Minister of Inland Revenue)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. $3,600. For patrolling the lobster fishery.

3. 57 feet 7 inches long, 12 feet 6 inches beam, and 4 feet 7 inches depth; 33-59 gross tons.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   STEAMER ' HUDSON.'
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PURCHASE OF SUPPLIES.

CON

Mr. GEO. TAYLOR:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has the Minister of Railways received any complaint or complaints as to the alleged unfair manner in which the Railway Commission has purchased its supplies?

2. Has the minister any information which would indicate that the contractors on the Transcontinental railway are compelled to purchase their supplies from any one firm, or is he aware that such is said to be the case?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PURCHASE OF SUPPLIES.
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LIB

Mr. GRAHAM: (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

1. It is not unusual when public bodies or governments are purchasers of supplies or goods, for dealers who think they should sell a greater quantity of such supplies and goods than is purchased from them, to *make complaint, and the Minister of Railways has had the usual experience in this respect.

2. No.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PURCHASE OF SUPPLIES.
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POULTRY DEPARTMENT, EXPERIMENTAL FARM.

CON

Mr. W. H. SHARPE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. How many men are employed in the Poultry Department at the Central Experimental Farm, and what is the salary of each?

2. What amount of ground is given up to this department ?

3. How many fowl are there at the farm at pi'esent?

4. What is the revenue from this department ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POULTRY DEPARTMENT, EXPERIMENTAL FARM.
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LIB

Hon. SYDNEY FISHER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Five, with salaries of $1,500, $1,300, $500, $605.31 and $515.70, respectively.

2. 3-05 acres.

3. 323.

4. Revenue :Fiscal year 1908-9, $620.91;

10 months, fiscal year 1909-10, $350.87.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POULTRY DEPARTMENT, EXPERIMENTAL FARM.
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THE ROSS RIFLE.


Mr. SAMUEL HUGHES (Victoria and Haliburton. Mr. Speaker, before the orders of the day are proceeded with, I beg, with your permission, to move the adjournment of the House in order to discuss the regulations of the National Rifle Association of Great Britain and Ireland, in which discrimination is made against the official arm of the Canadian militia. I regret that the Minister of Militia, owing to illness, is not here; but as the matter is of very great urgency, I would be pleased if the right hon. the First Minister would kindly bring the matter to the attention of the Minister of Militia. Leave being granted,


L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES.

ture sight, which it is found expedites shooting. The National Rifle Association passed this regulation:

Subject to the provisions set out in this subsection, an additional backsight may be used, or either of the backsights as issued may be removed, by withdrawal of the hinge pin only, and another backsight may be substituted for the removed backsight.

That would permit the use of the rear aperture sight; but it could be used only on a rifle which had already this rear aperture sight, so that by the removal of the hinge pin it could be used. They might as well have put in that regulation that no one could use the rear aperture sight except on a Lee-Enfield or a Lee-Metford rifle. Objection was taken to the fact that the Canadian rifle had a different rear aperture sight; but it having been authorized by the Minister of Militia, it was therefore within the rules, and objections were reluctantly withdrawn.

As to the success of the long Ross rifle, I may be permitted to point out a few of the winnings last year. It seems impossible that these can be a mere matter of chance. I do not want to take up time giving reasons why the Ross rifle is superior to others, but any of those skilled in the use of rifles can easily explain why. At Bisley last year it won the McKinnon cup, for the first time in history, with a score of 1,609 out of a possible 1,800. It won the Kolappre cup with a score of 765 out of a possible 840. It also won the Graphic cup with a score of 35 out of a possible 35; the Daily Graphic cup with a score of 35 out of a possible 35; another Daily Graphic cup with a score of 35 out of a possible 35; the Jubilee trophy, with a score of 2,375 out of a possible 2,640; and the All Comers aggregate, with a score of 167 out of a possible 175.

In the province of Quebec the long Ross rifle swept the entire match. In the Ontario matches, in the Tait-Brassey match, it took the first six places in Toronto last year. In the Osier match, it made a score of 49 out of a possible 50, and took the first five places in the extra series No. 1. In the Great West Tobacco match, it took the first two places, and in the Militia Aggregate, the first three places; and in the All Comers Aggregate, the first four places.

At the Dominion Rifle Association Meet, in the Bankers' match it won the first seven places, except the second. That could not be a matter of chance at all because the same class of men shot all round. In the Governor General's match, it made a score of 198 out of a possible 210. In the Bisley aggregate it took the first four places. In the Tyre match it took the first

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE ROSS RIFLE.
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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES.

But, now there is a change. The new rule provides that the rifle authorized by a colony shall not be used until it is submitted for endorsation, thus keeping the people in suspense until within three months of the match, and the National Rifle Association may take six weeks to come to a decision. Here is the rule:

The council have decided that no service rifle of any pattern other than the official pattern in use in the British army be admitted in service rifle competitions unless an officially specimen of such rifle be deposited with the National Rifle Association at least three months before the commencement of the Bisley meeting and approved for use at the Bisley meeting.

You must walk up three months in advance and say here is the rifle authorized by the Dominion, in use by the troops of the Dominion, manufactured in the Dominion, which swept Bisley last year and put the Lee Enfield out jo-f existence, and yet you have nevertheless to walk up hat in hand and say: Please, will you let me shoot -with it next year?

The other objectionable part is that the Ross rifle must be approved for use at the Bisley meeting. What we should insist on is that the rifle authorized by the Canadian government should be admitted to the competition at Bisley without any demur. Otherwise, no Canadian riflemen should go to Bisley. I think this whole business is engineered in Canada by conspirators in the pay of the small arm companies of England to discredit the Canadian rifle and make it appear that there is something crooked about it, when there never was a straighter transaction. What do we do? We adhere to the British caliber and a -303 bullet. What we should have is a -280 bullet, that is what we want. Still, in order to be able to use the same ammunition in any part of the world, we adopt the -303. We should have a rimless cartridge. The British use the obsolete rim cartridge. We maintain the old pattern so that the soldier who uses the Ross rifle may use the same ammunition as is used in the Lee-Enfield. We maintain these obsolete ideas merely to comply with the standard set up. But, moreover, only last month, the British government themselves have come out with the statement that their rifle is obsolete, and they are going to change it at an early day. Yet, they want to force us-no, I am not speaking of the British government now, but of the National Rifle Association, which is a sort of private institution-that association is endeavouring to force us to

give up the use of our long Ross rifle. But the self-respect of this government cannot rest under that rule. -Mr. J. D. REID. How are you going to make them change?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE ROSS RIFLE.
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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES.

I am very glad my hon. friend has asked that question. How are we going to make them change?_ Let the Canadian boys stay at home, if the British government will not step in and take action. The British government allow a lot of their officers to take part as range officers, and thus save the association thousands of dollars every year. Let the government be notified that the use of these obsolete ideas in regard to rifles does not meet with the approval of the Dominion of Canada. Then, if our boys go there, let them carry the rifle bearing the official stamp of the Dominion of Canada, and with the order in council in the pocket of the commandant of the team. They go on the ranges and say: ' Here is the official certificate, and here is the rifle bearing the stamp of the Dominion of Canada.' That is is all that should be necessary from any .colony in this empire, and no self-respecting colony would tolerate the demand of more. If they do not agree to that, so far as I am concerned not a Canadian rifleman will fire at Bisley this year or any other year until these gentlemen are brought to time. If they cannot be brought to time by reason, why, we can bide at home, shoot our own matches, and get along without them. We have shown at Bisley what the Ross rifle and the Canadian boys can do.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE ROSS RIFLE.
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March 2, 1910