January 31, 1910

FIRST READING.


Bill (No. 117) for the relief of George Robert Buttonshaw.


CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT SOCIETIES.

CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

Before the orders of the day are called, I would like to draw the attention of the right hon. the Prime Minister to Bill (No. 26) on Public Bills and Orders respecting Co-operative Credit Societies. My right hon. friend will remember that this co-operative measure was introduced two or three times into this House, and on the last occasion, two years ago, it was referred to a select committee, which after a long investigation, made a unanimous report in its favour and the Bill was afterwards adopted unanimously by the House. It then went to the Senate and

was defeated there by one vote at the end of that session.

Bill (No. 26) is exactly to the same import. I would remind my hon. friend that the Bill which was adopted by this House was taken up by the government after the report of the select committee and was put through by the Minister of Labour. I am afraid that the Bill I refer to, which is among Public Bills and Orders, as well as one a little further down the list of a more comprehensive character having reference to co-operation, introduced by the hon. member for Brantford (Mr. Harris) may not be called this session, which would be a great hardship to those interested. Could not the right hon. gentleman give us an opportunity to have these Bills put through and sent again to the Senate?

Topic:   CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT SOCIETIES.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

If we agree to this, I am afraid we shall have to agree to other motions of a similar character. At all events, I do not say nay to my hon. friend's request. We can go on with the order of the day and see this evening how far we have advanced.

Topic:   CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT SOCIETIES.
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THE NORTH POLE-TERRITORIAL RIGHTS.

L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. SAM. HUGHES.

I desire to call the attention of the right hon. the Prime Minister to the following despatch which appeared in the 'Citizen' and other newspapers on Saturday morning last:

(' Citizen/ Saturday, 29tli January, 1910.)

New York, Jan. 28.-'The question of who has territorial possession of the North Pole has been revived again by Capt. J. Bernier of Canada, who is here to attend the annual dinner of the Arctic club of America to-morrow night. Captain Bernier, will ask Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the Prime Minister of Canada, to request Britain, the United States, Russia, Sweden and Norway and Denmark, all maritime nations bordering on the Arctic sea -to designate official representatives to accompany him on bis forthcoming Polar expedition which is to leave Quebec on July 15th next. The principal object of the expedition, he said, will be for a division of the Polar sea in order that Canada and the other six nations may have their fishery rights properly defined. Captain Bernier will visit both Croker Land, discovered by Peary in 1906, and Bradley Land, which Dr. Cook reported that he sighted, and, after raising the British flag, will proclaim them formally annexed to the Dominion of Canada. Great Britain, he said, formerly ceded to the Dominion all islands in the Arctic sea lying within its lateral boundaries.

I desire to ask the government whether they have received any such) request from Captain Bernier; and if so, is it the intention of the government to remind Captain Bernier that Canada is not yet a nation but part of the British Dominions and intends remaining so, and the expression that Mr. MONK.

Canada is another nation or that Britain is another nation separate from Canada is not applicable to actual conditions.

Topic:   THE NORTH POLE-TERRITORIAL RIGHTS.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I have seen the despatch mentioned by my hon. friend. I do not know of any such intention on the part of Capt. Bernier as that attributed to him. I do not think that he has any intention of going into international complications. But, if Capt. Bernier spoke as he is reported to have spoken, all I can say is that I think he had better keep to his own deck.

Topic:   THE NORTH POLE-TERRITORIAL RIGHTS.
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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

That seems to imply that there is a project on to send Capt. Bernier to the North Pole under sanction of the Dominion government. Is that so?

Topic:   THE NORTH POLE-TERRITORIAL RIGHTS.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

No. Capt. Bernier will go north again this summer to patrol the waters of the north and assert Canadian jurisdiction.

Topic:   THE NORTH POLE-TERRITORIAL RIGHTS.
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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

I think somebody ought to take charge of this gentleman. He seems to be running loose.

Topic:   THE NORTH POLE-TERRITORIAL RIGHTS.
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PRIVILEGE-ACTION OF THE CROWN IN CAPITAL AND IN OTHER CASES.

LIB

Allen Bristol Aylesworth (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. A. B. AYLESWORTH.

I desire to say a word, as a matter of 'privilege, with reference to something that fell from my lips in connection with the discussion which took place on the 17th of January, on the motion for papers relating to the capital case of Walter Blythe. In discussing the practice upon the consideration of questions of clemency in capital cases, I made the remark that, in capital cases, His Majesty's instructions to the Governor General are not to act except upon the advice of his Privy Council, but, in other cases, he does not take that advice". It has been pointed out to me that the inference which might be drawn from my language-and which, I am sorry to say, was drawn by the hon. member for East Grey (Mr. Sproule)-was that, in cases other than capital cases, His Excellency acted upon his own responsibility. That, of course, is not the case. I was discussing capital cases only, and intending only to point out that, in capital cases, the re- * sponsibility for the action of His Excellency was upon the whole government; in cases other than capital cases, the responsibility is not upon the whole government, but no more is it upon His Excellency individually ; in such cases, His Excellency acts upon the advice of some minister, not necessarily the Minister of Justice, but ordinarily in practice always the Minister of Justice, upon whom the responsibility rests.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-ACTION OF THE CROWN IN CAPITAL AND IN OTHER CASES.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

I am glad the minister (Mr. Aylesworth) makes the explanation,

because it seems, to me it was different from the general impression and understanding, certainly different from the understanding I had, and I think it worth while to have a definite statement of it.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-ACTION OF THE CROWN IN CAPITAL AND IN OTHER CASES.
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POST OFFICE AT CAMBORNE.

CON

Arthur Samuel Goodeve

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GOODEVE.

Referring to an answer given by the First Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) on behalf of the Postmaster General (Mr. Lemieux) with regard to the post office at Camborne, B.C., I see that a petition has been sent in to the government asking that the post office at Camborne should 'be removed from the hotel. The Prime Minister, speaking on behalf of the Postmaster General, said that if the post office was in the hotel, the matter would be taken into consideration. I have a diagram of the hotel, showing the post office situated in the office of the hotel, between the bar-room and the card-room, which is very strongly objected to by the citizens. I will hand this over to the Postmaster General, and I trust he will take steps to have this remedied.

Topic:   POST OFFICE AT CAMBORNE.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

I will take it up with the Deputy Postmaster General at once.

Topic:   POST OFFICE AT CAMBORNE.
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THE WATERWAYS TREATY.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

I desire to ask the Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) if he has anything to announce respecting the present position of the Waterways treaty, and, if not, whether he expects to be able to make an announcement at an early day?

Topic:   THE WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

As I told the hon. member (Mr. R. L. Borden) the other day, we have some subsidiary negotiations as to the interpretation of an article of the contemplated treaty. As soon as these come to an end, we shall make an announcement to the House.

Topic:   THE WATERWAYS TREATY.
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January 31, 1910