January 24, 1910


H. Knink H. Quesnel J. and H. Tremblay. O. Lafranee J. Noble S. R. Connell C. Lefebvre Jos. Walker A. Lefebvre J. Steep L. M. Deslongchamps F. Lajeunesse J. Lajeunesse M. Landry


CON

James Davis Taylor

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. D. TAYLOR.

15 00 75 00 225 00 15 00 52 50 75 00 7 50 50 00 22 50 70 00 15 00 4 00 4 00 15 00

Topic:   CEMENT MERGER.
Permalink
CON

Mr. S. SHARPE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has the government received any complaints concerning the cement merger and the reported illegal combination resulting therefrom to inflate the prices of cement to consumers ?

2. Is the government aware that this merger is said to be unlawfully increasing the prices to consumers?

3. If the government is not aware of the illegal operations of the cement combine, does it intend to institute inquiries in respect thereto ?

4. Has the government under consideration the advisability of instituting' prosecution against those responsible for this alleged combine?

Topic:   CEMENT MERGER.
Permalink
LIB

Hon. MACKENZIE KING: (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

1. One communication has been received in which it is alleged that the effect of the cement merger has been to enhance the price of cement and restrict competition.

2. The government has received no information to this effect.

3 and 4. No representations as to any illegal operations of the cement merger have been made to the government.

GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC CLASSIFICATIONS. ' [DOT]

Topic:   CEMENT MERGER.
Permalink
CON

Mr. LENNOX:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Have any written objections to classification upon the Transcontinental railway been made since July 28, 1908? _

2. Have any objections been made in reference to overbreak or other over-expenditure since October 2, 1908?

3. Will the minister bring down a copy of these objections?

Topic:   CEMENT MERGER.
Permalink
LIB

MOTIONS AGREED TO WITHOUT DISCUSSION.


For a return showing: (a) the names of the contractors for construction of the National Transcontinental railway and the number, mileage and location of the contract; (b) the estimated expenditure under each contract at the time the contract was let, based upon the engineer's estimate of quantities, at rates of the accepted tender (c) the estimated increase or decrease in expenditure * in each case occasioned by change in location, specification, construction, material, grade or other change subsequent to the letting of the contract; (d) the amount returned and claimed on progress estimates under each contract to date; the amount actually paid under each contract, and the estimated amount yet required to complete the work in each case; (e) the engineer's estimated quantity of solid rock, loose rock and common excavation in the section of line covered by each contract, the estimated cost under these headings, based upon the rates of the accepted tender, the actual expenditure under these headings to date, as shown by progress estimates, the amounts actually paid to date under these headings, and the estimated quantities of work yet to be. done, and the estimated sums yet to be paid under these headings in respect to each contract. Also, as to all contracts other than the twenty-one covered by the return brought down on the 26th of April, 1909, No. 46h; a copy of (a) engineer's itemized estimate of quantities as to each contract of each class of work and material, as set out in the schedules and itemized, and total estimated expenditure based upon rates of accepted tender, and (b) a copy of all tenders received; (c) itemized quantities of work and material under the various headings actually done or furnished to date, and itemized, and total expenditure therefor; itemized statement of estimated quantities of work yet to be done and material, &c., yet to be furnished and itemized, and total estimated cost of the same based on contract prices.-Mr. Lennox. For a copy of all instructions given during his term of office by the Honourable Speaker Blanchet to the then Sergeant-at-Arms or to other officials in connection with the appointment of sessional messengers.-Mr. Monk. For a return showing what interest or control the Canadian Northern Railway Company has in any of the following railway companies: the Ontario and Rainy River Railway Company, the Port Arthur, Duluth and Western Railway Company, the Manitoba and South Eastern Railway Company, the Minnesota and Manitoba Railway Company, the Minnesota and Ontario Bridge Company, the Saskatchewan North Western Railway Company, the Qu'Appelle, Long Lake and Saskatchewan Railway Company, the Alberta Midland Railway Company, the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway Company. 2. What subsidies either in land, money, or by way of guarantee of securities have been granted to any of the railway companies, mentioned on account of the main or branch lines or both, of the said companies, either by the Dominion government, or the provincial governments of Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, or any municipality through which their lines run. 3. What portion of these subsidies have been earned to date. 4. How many miles west of Edmonton a line of railway is constructed and in operation by the Canadian Northern Railway Company. 5. What work other than location survey work has been done west of this point up to date, how much and of what nature. 6. What portion, if any, will eventually form part of the proposed line to Vancouver. 7. When the location plan of the route of the Canadian Northern railway between Edmonton and Vancouver, by way of the Yellow Head Pass was approved by the Minister of Railways and the Board of Railway Commissioners. 8. What applications, if any, have been made since to change or in any way alter this location plan. 9. To what extent, if any, the government of Manitoba has exercised its right of control of freight rates under section 8 of schedule B of the Act 1 Edward VII., chapter 53. 10. What effect, if any, this section of said Act has had in reducing freight rates in the province of Manitoba.-Mr. Smith, (Nanaimo.) For a return showing: 1. How many derailments have taken place over the Intercolonial railway during the year 1909. 2. At. what points of the railway each of these derailments took place, and at what dates. 3. The report made in each case, and the cause or causes mentioned in such report.- Mr. Talbot.


BRIDGES OF THE BEAUHARNOIS CANAL.

CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. F. D. MONK (Jacques Cartier) moved:

For a copy of all correspondence between Celestin Present, of Melocbeville, province of Quebec, either personally or through his attorney, and the Department of Railways and Canals, concerning certain bridges on the Beauharnois canal.

He said: On this motion I merely wish to remark now that the Beauharnois canal, having passed into the hands of a company headed by Messrs. McIntyre and Robert, it is claimed that they are not fulfilling the obligations that they assumed at the time to keep the canal in proper order for navigation and to maintain bridges. A number of complaints have been made that bridges are condemned and not repaired, and that in other respects the canal is not kept in the same order or in the state of repair in which it was kept when in the hands of the government. That is the reason I move for these papers. I will discuss the matter more fully when we are considering the estimates.

Topic:   BRIDGES OF THE BEAUHARNOIS CANAL.
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM.

It has perhaps escaped the attention of my hon. friend (Mr. Monk) that in the reply given by me to a question the other day, a categorical answer was given to statements similar to those he has now made. Of course, there is no objection to the motion. But when the papers come down I think it will be found that the contract is being carried out. Certainly the department will see to it that it is carried out.

Topic:   BRIDGES OF THE BEAUHARNOIS CANAL.
Permalink
CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

I was not in the House at the time referred to, but I assume that the minister stated that the purchasers or lessees of the canal were bound to fulfil the same obligations as the government. I presume that was the answer given.

Topic:   BRIDGES OF THE BEAUHARNOIS CANAL.
Permalink
LIB
CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

The reason I am asking for the correspondence is to bring to the notice of the House cases of individual hardship at Melocheville and elsewhere, in order that the government may more strenuously insist on the carrying out by the company of its said obligations.

Topic:   BRIDGES OF THE BEAUHARNOIS CANAL.
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


PROPOSAL TO SELL INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY.

LIB

Judson Burpee Black

Liberal

Mr. J. B. BLACK (Hants).

Mr. Speaker, in moving the resolution on the subject of the Intercolonial which stands in my name, I desire, with the approval of my seconder the hon. member for Annapolis (Mr. Pickup) and with the consent of the House, to add a sentence to the resolution. With this addition, the resolution will read as follows:

That in the opinion of this House it would be in the best interests of the maritime provinces and for the general good of Canada Mr. MONK.

that the Intercolonial railway be operated and controlled by one of the companies oper-. ating the Canadian Transcontinental lines, or by such other corporation as may offer the best facilities for the development of the country tributary to the Intercolonial.

I add these words because some of my friends have insinuated that I was moving the resolution in the interest of the Canadian Pacific railway and some others have suggested that I was doing it in the interest of the Canadian Northern. I add these words so that we may give everybody that wants to lease the Intercolonial railway an opportunity to lease it. I am perfectly disinterested in this matter. Fortunately or unfortunately I am not acquainted with a single official of the Canadian Northern or with a single official of the Canadian Pacific railway. I represent a county through which the Intercolonial railway runs. My object in moving this resolution is simply to promote the interests of the maritime provinces, wrhose interests lie very near to my heart, for I was born in one of those provinces and have lived for forty-seven years in another. Before going further I may say that I am very sorry that I had arranged to introduce this resolution today. Had I known that the House was to adjourn at six o'clock, I would have left the resolution over. But as I had asked other hon. gentlemen who preceded me on the Order Paper to allow me an opportunity, I shall go on with it. As the time afforded for discussion is short, I shall make my remarks as brief as possible. There are gentlemen in this House who will speak against this resolution, I am sure, who, in their hearts, are in favour of it.

Topic:   PROPOSAL TO SELL INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY.
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS

Order.

Topic:   PROPOSAL TO SELL INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY.
Permalink
LIB

Judson Burpee Black

Liberal

Mr. BLACK.

I think I am perfectly in order. I think that on this question some of the maritime members are in the same situation as certain representatives of Newfoundland on the question of confederation. Certain interested parties have drilled it into the minds of the people of Newfoundland that confederation with Canada would ruin that colony, and no politician would feel safe in advocating such a union. This question I now bring before the House is a very delicate question for a member who, in advocating it, has to stand in the face of the opposition of his constituents. I, fortunately, from certain circumstances, am in a position-I will not say of indifference -but I am perfectly prepared to advocate the leasing of this road to some company that will make a better use of it than the present commission or any of the managers of the past have been able to do. I regret exceedingly that some of the maritime newspapers, as soon as this order was put on the order paper, went off at half-cock and criticised it and commented on it adversely

without waiting to know the merits of the case. I will quote the evidence from a paper in the maritime provinces, which said:

The leasing of this road would be a confession that the Liberal party is unequal to the task of satisfactorily administering a great public property in the interests of the tax-payers.

So far as the Intercolonial is concerned, I think the sooner the Liberal party makes that confession the better. I Think that, like every other honest confession, it would be good for the soul of the party. There has been no government since confederation that has administered the Intercolonial railway satisfactorily, and there never will be a government that will manage that road in the interest of the country, because it is impossible under the circumstances by which the country is bound. It is impossible that the government can compete with other railways, or that they can adopt modern railway business methods. Now here is another sentence in the same paper:

There are certain Nova Scotia interests which favour the alienation of the Intercolonial.

I suppose that was intended to hit somebody, I do not know who, but it does not hit me at all. But I quite agree with the editorial, that it is in the interest of Nova Scotia to favour the alienation of the Intercolonial, as we will see by and by. Another paper, this time from Moncton, attacked my resolution a litte more vigorously than the paper to which I have referred. It shouts ' Hands off the peoples' railway.' Sir, I have remarked for a great many years that when you couple the name of the people with a corporation or an individual, there is something about the corporation or the individual that wont measure four square all round. I do not care whether you shout the peoples' railway, or the peoples' Jimmy, or the peoples' William, there is always something at the bottom that is not just four square. The people of Moncton, in shouting ' Hands off the peoples' railway,' are very much like those people mentioned in ancient history, who shouted without reason * Great is Diana of the Ephesians,' because they thought their calling was in danger. I think we can safely assure the people of Moncton, that if the Intercolonial is handed over to a private company, their craft will not be in danger, their city will be even more prosperous than it is now. I would like to get at the bottom of this cry about ' The peoples' railway.' What people is it? Who owns the railway? Does Nova Scotia own it any more than British Columbia? Does it belong any more to the people of New Brunswick than it does to

the people of Ontario? Who gets the benefit of it? How much benefit are the people getting from this peoples' railway beyond what they are able to pay for? If any of the people want to travel on the peoples' railway, I think they have to pay about as much as they do on any other railway. If any of the people want to send freight from Montreal to St. John they pay just exactly as much money to the peoples' railway as they pay to the Canadian Pacific railway.

If any person from Halifax, say an invalid who wants to go to Montreal to take the waters, purchases a ticket, he will find that he pays exactly the same price for it over the peoples' railway that he does over the Canadian Pacific railway.

Topic:   PROPOSAL TO SELL INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY.
Permalink
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

Is the hon. gentleman not aware of the fact that there was a return brought down to this House some years ago showing the cost of carrying wheat over that road per mile and over the Canadian Pacific railway and other roads in this country, and it was shown that it cost about one-fourth as much to carry it over the Intercolonial per mile as it did over the other roads?

Topic:   PROPOSAL TO SELL INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY.
Permalink

January 24, 1910