December 15, 1909

PRIVATE BILLS.

FIRST READINGS.


Bill (No. T8) respecting the Edmonton, Dunvegan and British Columbia Railway Company.-Mr. Douglas. Bill (No. 79) respecting the Hamilton, Waterloo and Guelph Railway Company.- Mr. Harris. Bill (No. 80) to incorporate l'Institut de Notre-Dame des Missions.-Mr. W. M. Martin.


CON

John Dowsley Reid

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. D. REID.

As I understand this 12th report, it is a report allowing the application of the company seeking incorporation as the St. Lawrence Power Company to be put through without the proper notice having been given. Am I right in understanding that?

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   FIRST READINGS.
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LIB

James Kirkpatrick Kerr (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

I am informed that the report of the examiner of petitions will go to the Committee on Standing Orders.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
Subtopic:   FIRST READINGS.
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REGULATION OF HORSE RACING.


Mr. WALLACE moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 81) to regulate horse racing.


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Explain.

Topic:   REGULATION OF HORSE RACING.
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CON

Thomas George Wallace

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WALLACE.

This is a Bill dealing with horse racing in Canada. The object of this Bill is to limit the length of race meetings in Canada, which will stop gambling at least to a certain extent. We do not desire at all to interfere with the legitimate sport of horse racing, and this Bill does not interfere with it, but there are many race tracks at which race meetings are held for forty, fifty or sixty days. These tracks are not being operated for the sport of it at all but for the gambling end of it. We want therefore to limit horse racing to thirty days in the year divided between fifteen consecutive days in the spring and fifteen days in the fall there being a proviso that between spring and fall meetings there must be an interval of at least forty days.

Topic:   REGULATION OF HORSE RACING.
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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


QUESTIONS.

APPOINTMENT OF MR. WILLIAM CULLITM.

CON

Mr. BARNARD:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has William Cullum been appointed inspector of boilers under section 572 of the Canada Shipping Act? If so, what was the date of his appointment?

2. Did the said William Cullum before his appointment receive a certificate from the Board of Steamboat Inspection, as required by section 573 of said Act?

3. If so, what was the date of such certificate, and by whom was it signed?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF MR. WILLIAM CULLITM.
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LIB

Hon. L. P. BRODEUR: (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

1. Yes, June 1, 1908.

2 and 3. Yes, as the result of an examination held by the Board of Steamboat Inspection at Victoria, British Columbia, in March, 1898. The Chairman of the board, Mr. E. Adams, issued his certificate on May 12, 1908, that Mr. Cullum was qualified under the Act. ,

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF MR. WILLIAM CULLITM.
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TONNAGE TAX ON CANADIAN VESSELS.

CON

John Allister Currie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. A. CURRIE:

'

1. Have any representations or complaints been made to the government relative to the imposition of a tonnage tax upon Canadian ships operating on the Great Lakes entering United States ports?

2. What is the amount of this tax, by what law imposed, and how collected?

3. Was there any reciprocal arrangements as to freedom from any tax of this kind in force until this year? If so, when was this arrangement made, the nature of it, and by whom ?

1. Does this tax abrogate the arrangement made also as to the reciprocal free use of the canals?

5. Is it the intention of the government to impose a similar tonnage tax upon United States ships trading on the Great Lakes to Canadian ports?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TONNAGE TAX ON CANADIAN VESSELS.
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LIB

Mr. BRODEUR: (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

1. No.

2. Turn cents per registered ton, not to exceed in the aggregate ten cents per ton in any one year. This tax is imposed by section 36 of the new United States tariff and is collected by the collector of customs at the port of entry.

3. Yes, under the authority of an order in council of the 21st of November, 1884, application was made to the United States government for the abolition of all tonnage tax on vessels entering a port in the United States from any port in the province of Ontario. On the 31st January, 1885, president Arthur issued a proclamation exempting vessels arriving at a port in the United States from any port in the province of Ontario, from the tonnage tax of three cents per ton, not to exceed fifteen cents in any one year.

In consideration of the privileges enjoyed by the Ontario vessels in ports of the United States, the collection of Harbour Masters' fees from United States vessels arriving at ports in the said province was waiv ed by the Dominion government.

4. No.

5. The collection of the fees-imposed under section 862, of the Canada Shipping Act, which has been waived since 1885, was resumed on 1st December, 1909.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TONNAGE TAX ON CANADIAN VESSELS.
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PERMANENT FORCE-ENTERTAINING ALLOWANCES.

CON

Mr. WORTHINGTON:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Are there any regulations governing entertaining allowances for the officers of the permanent force? If so, in what manner are

such allowances made, and to what officers?

2. Has the officer commanding Quebec district been entitled to or in receipt of such allowance? If not, why not?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PERMANENT FORCE-ENTERTAINING ALLOWANCES.
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LIB

Sir FREDERICK BORDEN : (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal

1. No regulations on the subject. Enter taining allowance is granted to the following officers and messes :

The officer commanding maritime provinces command, Halifax. ,

Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery mess, Quebec.

Royal Canadian Mounted Rifles mess, Winnipeg.

The allowances at Halifax and Quebec have been granted in consequence of the necessity arising for entertainment of Brit ish and foreign men of war, and in view of the fact that, prior to the garrison at Halifax being transferred from the imperial government to Canada, the officers commanding received similar allowances.

At Winnipeg, owing to the very few officers in the mess, it is impossible for them to maintain their position in a proper manner without some assistance.

2. The officer commanding Quebec command at Montreal is not in receipt of an entertaining allowance, and it is not considered necessary at that station.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PERMANENT FORCE-ENTERTAINING ALLOWANCES.
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December 15, 1909