November 26, 1909

OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE DEBATES.


Mr. GERVAIS presented the first report of the Select Standing Committee on Debates as follows: Your committee recommend that, commencing with this session, the printing of both the English and French Revised Editions of the Debates for distribution to the public and the press be discontinued and that [DOT] the King's Printer be authorized to have printed during the course of the session for the use. of senators and members of the House 600 copies of the current sheets of the English Revised Edition and 100 copies of the French Revised Edition. Mr. GERVAIS moved the adoption of the report. Mr.'SPROULE. We have not had an opportunity of examining that report yet.


IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN.

I would like to suggest to the hon. gentleman who proposes the motion, that I think he ought to make provision for the distribution daily of the unrevised edition of the 1 Hansard ' to the press and especially to the daily press.

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CON
IND
?

Mr GERVAIS.

Yes, that is provided for in the regulations. As a matter of fact this report is merely to save a few dollars to the exchequer of Canada by discontinuing the useless distribution of a few thousand copies of the revised edition. The unrevised edition is distributed daily to the press and to the general public. I think that the press and especially my hon. friend (Mr. W. F. Maclean) will be satisfied. During last session every one was satisfied with this arrangement. This motion is

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really to confirm that practice and to comply with the request made by the King's Printer.

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CON

George Taylor

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GEO. TAYLOR.

We have been in the habit of issuing to the weekly and daily press a revised copy of the ' Hansard.' We decided there was no use in sending that out, that we would send the unrevised edition instead, and this is merely to authorize the King's Printer not to send out both the revised and the unrevised to the press generally. We merely discontinue the printing of a number of extra copies of the revised edition which we have been sending to the press.

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Motion agreed to.


FIRST READINGS.


Bill (No. 42), respecting the Edmonton and Slave Lake Railway Company-Mr. Cash. Bill (No. 43), respecting the Hudson Bay Insurance Company-Mr. Knowles. Bill (No. 44), respecting the Montreal Central Terminal Company-Mr. Ethier. Bill (No. 45), respecting the Phoenix Assurance Company, Limited-Mr. Macdonald. Bill (No. 46), to incorporate the Pine Pass Railway Company-Mr. W. H. White.


INSPECTION OF VESSELS.


Mr. LEWIS moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 47) to provide for inspection of vessels not now inspected.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS

Explain.

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CON

Edward Norman Lewis

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LEWIS.

Mr. Speaker, the object of the Bill which I now ask permission to introduce is two-fold. In the first place, clauses 1, 2, 3 and 4 refer to barges and vessels not now inspected. I know for a fact, Sir, that what I am about to say with reference to this matter is absolutely correct as far as the great lakes are concerned, and I am informed that the same conditions .exist in the maritime provinces. The custom is for old wooden boats and vessels, out of which the engines and masts have been taken, to be towed by other boats. While the government of Canada does not allow well found boats to leave a harbour unless they are properly equipped, no such provision for the safety of the crew is enforced in reference to these barges. One section of this Bill provides that they shall be inspected. Another section refers to steam yachts under five tons, clause 6 refers to fishing boats. These boats under a certain tonnage are not obliged to carry either a life boat, life raft or other apparatus for the saving of human life. In 120 Ontario reports, Sturgeon vs. The Port Bur-Mr. GBR VAIS.

well Fishing Company, page 154, it is clearly laid down in the judgment that had the boat in question, which is of the class referred to in this Bill, been equipped with life-saving apparatus, the lives of one or two men lost on that occasion would have been saved.

The last section refers to steamships towing vessels of steel which have not motive power. As is well known, these steel vessels cannot approach close to one another and the consequence is that when a line breaks, as frequently happens, the men on the tow are almost invariably lost. I desire by this amendment to provide that all steamships towing other boats shall have on board a rocket gun by which a heaving line can be sent 300 or 400 feet and a vessel with motive power can thus pick up her derelict tow. The United States steel trust which owns the largest number of vessels on the continent obliges all its vessels to carry rocket guns.

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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


INSPECTION AND SALES ACT AMENDMENT.

?

Mr. J. A.@

CURRIE (North Simcoe) moved for leave to introduce a Bill to amend the Inspection and Sales Act. He said: I find that under the British North America Act, this parliament has exclusive jurisdiction in matters relating to weights and measures. This parliament in its wisdom has seen fit to pass legislation fixing standards for weights and other measures. Parliament has also passed an Inspection and Sales Act which deals with the standard weight of certain articles, such as a bushel of grain, a barrel of flour, a barrel of salt, a load of hay and a bag of potatoes in Quebec. Parliament has also fixed the weight of a dozen of eggs at one and a half pounds. I find, however, that the most important article of food entering into every-day consumption, that is the loaf of bread, has not been standardized by this parliament and the various municipalities and provinces have from time to time been struggling with this question, some of them endeavouring to fix the weight at one figure and others at another. Thus there is confusion and the law is not carried out. In consequence the public, especially the poorer classes, have suffered. I think that we should follow the wise legislation of the mother country and the other colonies in this respect and fix the weight of a loaf of bread as clearly as we have the right to do under the British North America Act.

This Bill is intended as an amendment and to become part 11 of the Inspection and Sales Act. The first clause defines the terms ' baker ' ' inspector ' and ' officers.'

The second clause provides that all bread sold by bakers shall be in loaves of one two and four pounds. That fixes a standard for the whole of Canada. Provision is made in the Bill for the carrying out of its provisions. It provides that inspectors under the Inspection and Sales Act, inspectors appointed under the Inland Revenue Act or other inspectors appointed by this government for special purposes, shall be considered inspectors under this part of this Bill. It also provides that the officials appointed under provincial statute or under municipal by-law, whose duty it would be to see to the enforcement of this Act, shall have jurisdiction in certain cases. Penalties are fixed for having bread under weight and also against a baker if he or the man who delivers his bread does not supply himself with proper scales and appliances to weigh the bread he is selling. I trust that the Minister of Inland Revenue, under whose care I presume this Bill will come, will expedite its passage through the House. I ask the indulgence of the House in reference to it because I think it is a measure in the interests of the public. It is an absolute necessity that we should have a standard weight for a loaf of bread and that standard should be so fixe'd that there will be some legal redress in case of a baker breaking the law.

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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Hon. SYDNEY FISHER (Minister of Agriculture).

There is a question as to whether a Bill of this kind should not be introduced by resolution. It seems to me to affect and regulate trade, which, under the general rule of the House, is a subject matter that must be introduced by resolution. If we are going to regulate the weight of a loaf of bread that regulates the trade in bread as much as any possible treatment of that trade can. It is well understood that Bills of that kind must be introduced by resolution.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

If that be the fact, the minister must be a great offender, because he has introduced such measures without resolution.

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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

I think my hon. friend will find that I have invariably introduced such Bills by resolution.

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November 26, 1909