November 24, 1909

RESTAURANT OF THE HOUSE.

LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Hon. WM. PUGSLEY (Minister of Public Works).

It becomes necessary to appoint a committee of the House of Commons to act in conjunction with the committee of the Senate in connection with the restaurant. As the present committee of the House has given such satisfaction during the past year, I would move that they be reappointed. I therefore move:

Topic:   RESTAURANT OF THE HOUSE.
Permalink

19C9


That the members of the House of Commons on the permanent Joint Committee on the restaurant be His Honour the Speaker, and Messrs. Monk, Harris, Macdonald and Stanfield. Motion agreed to.


MESSAGE FROM HIS EXCELLENCYSUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES.

?

Right Hon. S@

FIELDING (Minister of Finance) delivered a message from His Excellency the Governor General.

Mr. SPEAKER read the message as follows :

Grey:

The Governor General transmits to the House of Commons Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year ending on the 31st March, 1910, and, in accordance with the provisions of ' The British North America Act, 1867', the Governor General recommends these estimates to the House of Commons.

Government House,

Ottawa, Nov. 24, 1909.

Mr. FIELDING moved that His Excellency's message together with the estimates be referred to the Committee of Supply.

Topic:   MESSAGE FROM HIS EXCELLENCYSUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES.
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


NATIONAL TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILWAY-RESIGNATION OF MR. LUMS-DEN.

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

Mr. Speaker, might I suggest to my hon. friend the Minister of Railways and Canals (Mr. Graham) that the papers brought down yesterday in connection with the resignation of Mr. Lums-den ought to be printed without delay. Perhaps he would be good enough to make a motion to that effect. Before he makes the motion I would like to ask whether this return includes all the papers. The motion that passed the House referred to any communications from Mr. Lumsden to the Prime Minister. I did not observe them in the papers. I do not know that there was any such communication but if there was one it should be brought down.

Topic:   NATIONAL TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILWAY-RESIGNATION OF MR. LUMS-DEN.
Permalink
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Perhaps there is. If there is such a communication I will bring it down to-morrow.

Topic:   NATIONAL TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILWAY-RESIGNATION OF MR. LUMS-DEN.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

This might perhaps be proceeded with in the meantime if the Prime Minister has no objection. I would move:

That Rule 72 relating to the printing of public documents be suspended in the case of the papers relating to the resignation of Mr. H. D. Lumsden, as Chief Engineer of the Transcontinental railway, and that all such papers be ordered to be printed forthwith..

Topic:   NATIONAL TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILWAY-RESIGNATION OF MR. LUMS-DEN.
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE-DELAY OF RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE.

IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN.

Mr Speaker, at this stage of the proceedings I am going to bring up as a question of privilege, the condition of the railways of this country in connection with the storm of yesterday, and I propose to show why myself and other members have not been able to get here because of the inefficiency of these roads. People who left Toronto the night before last only got here last night while others who left last night are only here now, with the result, that they missed their engagements yesterday and most of them to-day. It seems to me that the railway service in the province of Ontario, which has been organized for years, is altogether inadequate to the requirements of the country, especially between Toronto and Ottawa. The Grand Trunk Railway Company have promised to give us a line from Ottawa to Kingston connecting with their main system at that point, but it has not been built. The Canadian Pacific Railway Company have promised to double track their system between Ottawa and Toronto, and this has not been done, although it has been Dromised for years. In consequence, whenever there is the slightest storm, the road breaks down, the public are not accommodated, and people are not able to keep their engagements. There is another thing which I notice and I believe it is the cause of the inferior railway service in this country, and it is that the railway men, the general managers, whenever they wish to travel, are so distrustful of their own system and so distrustful of the accommodation that the public have that they always go in private cars, with especially well equipped larders. This morning there were two railway magnates with special cars with well equipped larders and they were well looked after. The Chairman of the Railway Commission was there, and he was looked after while the general public was lacking accommodation. When the Minister of Railways travels he has so little confidence in the railways and the treatment that they give the general public that he has his private car. This is an abuse of the railway system of this country. The railway and political magnates travel in these specially equipped cars and we failed to make time last night-we were four hours coming from Smith's Falls-because the engine was overtaxed by these magnates' cars.

If these magnates want to travel on these special cars, and if they cannot give ordinary accommodation to the public, let them hook up to the freight trains. If, instead of that they were compelled to travel as the ordinary Canadian travels there would be a great improvement in the railway service of this country. I will venture to make the statement after a personal in-

vestigation that the equipment of our Canadian railways is always at the minimum. The moment there is a strain the service falls down, trains are delayed, and the ordinary public cannot keep their engagements. It is time the Minister of Railways took up this question in order to see that the city of Toronto and the city of Ottawa have better railway service than they have now and that an improvement takes place throughout the province.of Ontario as well as in the older provinces of the Dominion. He will find that we cannot get here in time to attend to our duties because the energy of the railway managements is devoted rather to the acquisition of new lines in the west-

Sir WILFRID LAURIER Order.

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE-DELAY OF RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE.
Permalink
LIB

James Kirkpatrick Kerr (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

The hon. gentleman is right in discussing the matter as a question of privilege in so far as inconvenience and delay have been caused to himself in getting here, but not in undertaking to discuss the railway system generally. It must be confined to the question of privilege which is a question personal to the hon. gentleman.

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE-DELAY OF RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE.
Permalink
IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN.

I quite admit what you say, Mr. Speaker, and I must accept your decision in the matter. But, I still say that if I were speaking to the question of privilege I would contend that the reason I am not able to get here in time is that the railway managers are not attending to their business and are not giving the accommodation they ought to. I hope that the Minister of Railways will find a way of stopping these magnates from delaying trains and that he will see that the railways are better equipped.

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE-DELAY OF RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE.
Permalink
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

As one who was also on the same train as my hon. friend (Mr. W. F. Maclean) I may say that it occurred to me in looking along the line that the delay was occasioned almost wholly by the breaking down of the telegraph and telephone lines, which I thought could be avoided if these were either put under or upon the ground, because the increased weight from the ice broke them down and the train was obliged to feel its way from station to station to avoid danger. .

Topic:   QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE-DELAY OF RAILWAY PASSENGER SERVICE.
Permalink

FIRST READINGS.


Bill (No. 27), respecting the British North American Mining Company.-Mr. Geoffrion Bill (No. 28), respecting the Campbellford, Lake Ontario and Western Railway Company-Mr. Fowke. Bill (No. 29), respecting the Columbia and Western Railway Company.-Mr. Goodeve. Bill (No. 30), respecting the Eastern Townships Railway Company-Mr. Laver-gne.


IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN.

Bill (No. 31), respecting the Kamloops and Yellow Head Pass Railway Company. -Mr. Burrell.

Bill (No. 32), respecting the Nicola, Kamloops and Similkameen Coal and Railway Company.-Mr. Burrell.

Bill (No. 33), respecting the Northern

Mortgage Company of Canada.-Mr. A. Haggart.

Bill (No. 34), respecting the Ottawa, Northern and Western Railway Company. -Mr. McGiverin. .

Bill (No. 35), respecting the South Ontario Pacific Railway Company.-Mr. Nesbitt.

Bill (No. 36), respecting the Union Life Assurance Company.-Mr. McGiverin.

Bill (No. 37), respecting the Walkerton and Lucknow Railway Company.-Mr. Donnelly. i

Bill (No. 38), respecting the West Ontario Pacific Railway Company.-Mr. Nesbitt.

Topic:   FIRST READINGS.
Permalink

November 24, 1909