March 17, 1909

CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAGGART.

The hon. member for Simcoe (Mr. Lennox) has two questions on

the Order Paper, one of them with reference to the original quantities that were estimated to be on the national Transcontinental Railway and the quantities as found by actual work upon the road. I would like to have that information before the discussion.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC LOAN.
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CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LENNOX.

My hon.Jiriend refers to the order of the House for the production of papers which has not yet been complied with. There is another motion on the Order Paper bearing on a somewhat similar question.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC LOAN.
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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM.

I will ask the commissioners to give me that matter with all possible speed. I will look up the motion on the list and see what it calls for.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC LOAN.
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WATERS OF LAKE SIMOOE.

CON

Samuel Simpson Sharpe

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SAMUEL SHARPE.

I would ask the Minister of Public Works when we may expect the return ordered by the House on the 8th of February respecting the measures taken by the government to lower the waters of Lake Simcoe and Lake Couclii-ching?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   WATERS OF LAKE SIMOOE.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

I thought that had to do with the Trent Valley canal and so was in the Railway Department, but I will make inquiries.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   WATERS OF LAKE SIMOOE.
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CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE SEIZURES.

CON

John Barr

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARR.

When will the return be brought down asked for on the 8th of February, concerning the seizures of the Department of Inland Revenue?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE SEIZURES.
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LIB

William Templeman (Minister of Mines; Minister of Inland Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. TEMPLEMAN.

I was not aware a return had been ordered, but I will give instructions to have it brought down.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE SEIZURES.
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LIB

William Paterson (Minister of Customs)

Liberal

Mr. PATERSON.

Does the hon. gentleman refer to the customs seizures?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE SEIZURES.
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CON

John Barr

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARR.

I also asked for customs.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE SEIZURES.
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LIB

William Paterson (Minister of Customs)

Liberal

Mr. PATERSON.

The return has been brought down with regard to both.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS AND INLAND REVENUE SEIZURES.
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PAY OF MILITIA AT HALIFAX.

CON

Adam Brown Crosby

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CROSBY.

I am credibly informed that the men of the permanent force in Halifax have not yet received the last pay due them. If that be the case when will they be paid?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PAY OF MILITIA AT HALIFAX.
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LIB

Frederick William Borden (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal

Sir FREDERICK BORDEN.

I am informed that the fund for paying the permanent force was exhausted on the 7th or 8th of this month, but fortunately there was plenty of money voted during the last session of parliament for the whole militia. A slight readjustment will be necessary and the supplementary estimates which were laid on the table of the House a few

days ago will provide for that readjustment. So" soon as these estimates pass which I hope will be in a short time-perhaps within a few hours if the House consents-the pay will be available. I have heard no complaint from any source, and I wish to take this opportunity of reassuring the junior member for Halifax and the permanent force that the pay will be forthcoming in due season.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PAY OF MILITIA AT HALIFAX.
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SUPPLY-RURAL FREE MAIL DELIVERY.


Mr. FIELDING moved that the House go into Committee of Supply.


CON

Joseph Elijah Armstrong

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. E. ARMSTRONG (East Lambton).

I wish to direct the attention of the House to some matters pertaining to the department of the Postmaster General. It has been my privilege to have had a seat in the House for the past six years and I must say I have appreciated the ability shown by the Postmaster General both as Solicitor General and in his present office. And while I appreciate the efforts he has been putting forth on behalf of the people in general, I cannot fail to appreciate also the ability or the agility he has shown in taking a right about face on the important question of furnishing better mail facilities to the rural districts. I need not remind the House of the statements made by the Postmaster General for some years past on the important measure introduced on a number of occasions with regard to the establishment of rural free mail delivery in Canada. As we are all aware the hon. gentleman has distinctly stated many a time that we could not expect to have such a system until we had a population 20,000,000, and that it wa3 a luxury that could only be thought of as ideal. Last session a resolution was moved urging upon the government the necessity of dealing with this matter in an energetic manner Every member on the government side of the House voted in direct opposition to that resolution, and it was generally understood that they would not take any other position on that important question. However, just on the eve of the general election the hon. Postmaster General, in a speech which he delivered at Niagara Falls, showed plainly the position he took in regard to it. He showed that it was his desire to make a political football of the question, by announcing to the people of the Dominion that he was going to give them free rural mail delivery. Not only did he humbusr the people by his announcement on that occasion, but a number of Liberal candidates, in their political campaigns, announced repeatedly in their constituencies the wonderful advantages which the people would receive from the boon granted to them by the present government. I have

here papers showing that several Liberal members of parliament told their constituencies that they were not only going to get their mails delivered at their doors if they returned this government to power, but the boxes would be furnished to them free, that all they would have to do would be to bore a post-hole and put up a post, and the box would be delivered to them.

Let me go a little further. On the 17th of September, 1908, the Post Office Department issued a pamphlet which was quite different from the one which was issued only a few weeks ago. In the first pamphlet you will not find any reference to the price of the mail boxes or any suggestion that the people will have to pay for them, while in the later pamphlet the Postmaster General distinctly states that the cost of these boxes, with the necessary fittings, will be $3 each, and they can only be obtained from the Post Office Department. I cannot understand why the minister found it necessary to issue these two different pamphlets, were it not that he felt that the position which he had taken in the first place was not likely to meet with the! general approval of the people.

However, let us look into this matter of the boxes for a few moments. The Postmaster General stated in reply to a number of questions I asked on the subject that he had purchased these boxes in the city of New York from the International Mail Equipment Company of New York. I would like the hon. gentleman to explain to this House who are the members of that company or tell us something about it; because I have here, from the latest report of the United States Post Office Department, a list of the firms which have supplied the boxes for the rural districts of the United States, not only during the last year, but during the past five years, and among the names of 300 firms I do not find any such name as the one mentioned by the hon. Postmaster General. How the hon. minister came to purchase 6,000 boxes from a firm which apparently has not been in the habit of manufacturing boxes for the rural districts of the United States I cannot quite understand. Further, in examining into the cost of the boxes used in the United States and comparing it with the price paid by the Postmaster General, I find a very great difference. For instance, out of over 300 boxes that are supplied to the Post Office Department of the United States there are two boxes that cost $2.75 each one at $3, one at $3.25, one at $3.50, and one at $4. The balance of the boxes cost only $2.50 or less. The average would not exceed $1.50. Yet the hon. Postmaster General goes to New York and purchases 6,000 boxes, costing in New York $3 each, and. according to his own statement, he pays the freight from New York to Ottawa Mr. ARMSTRONG.

and the customs duties on them, and delivers them to the different districts in Canada, and then they are not lock boxes. They are to be supplied with locks from the department at cost. So that the people of Canada will find, after the freight and customs duties are added to the amount paid for the boxes in the city of New York, and the amount they will have to pay for locks, that these boxes will cost them over $5 apiece. For 6,000 boxes that will amount to over $30,000. Let us compare that with the amount paid by the people of the United States for their boxes. The boxes are delivered to the farmers in the different 'districts, and the department at Washington pays for them only from 42 cents to $2.50 each. I hope the minister will be good enough to explain to us his position in that regard.

Then, I might ask why it is that in the proposition the hon. Postmaster General has made to this House, there is no provision for any reduction in the number of post offices; while the Post Office Department of the United States has been able to dispense with over 100,000 post offices as a result of the splendid system they have inaugurated in that country. I might ask the Postmaster General still further why it is that in the splendid system he has been granting to the people of the Dominion, he is not delivering registered letters and issuing money orders ? He is aware that in the United States registered letters are delivered and money orders issued to the people living along the main and side roads, if they live within one mile of their box. and they are also able to purchase post cards and stamped envelopes, and have many other advantages. I might go on to speak of the parcel post. When a parcel that is too large for the box or a money order or a registered letter comes to a man who is living on a mail route or stage route at the present time, it would be necessary for him to go to the distributing post office, perhaps five miles away, to receive his mail or else he would have to depend entirely on the carrier. Further than that the minister knows that the system which he has inaugurated in Canada, although it may be called a step in the direction of rural mail delivery, can have no other result than to create contention and strife in the rural districts of Canada. I cannot understand why a man who happens to live on a mail or stage route-and I am sure the department will have difficulty in defining just which are the existing mail and stage routes-should have his farm increased in value owing to the advantages conferred on him by that delivery, by having his daily papers, having market quotations and many other advantages denied to others whose farms do not happen to be on mail routes. I am sure that when the

farmers thoroughly understand this question they will urge upon the Postmaster General the necessity of enlarging this scheme and giving this service to the thickly settled portions of the Dominion of Canada. The minister knows that the United States system is carried on under certain definite regulations, and while he may contend and try to becloud the issue by saying that our country is sparsely settled, that we cannot possibly grant to the people of Canada rural free mail delivery, yet he knows that in the United States the sparsely settled districts are not being served by rural free mail delivery, and the United States government have no intention of serving these rural districts until they become sufficiently populated to come under the existing regulations. The United States regulations provide that the standard route must be 24 miles long, that there must be 100 families on it, and that 84 of these must be willing to pay for a box and put it up before any route can be established; and if the route should be shorter than 24 miles the rural mail carrier's wages are proportionately reduced, although even if the route is shorter than the standard it must contain a proportionate number of families. Hence I claim that it is nonsense for members of the government to contend that the Americans have free delivery in the sparsely settled districts.

I would ask the minister what he intends to do with his present surplus. He may say that he is going to leave it as part of the Consolidated Revenue Fund, but I would ask him if he thinks it is wise to make the Post Office Department a taxing department, that the postal service should be utilized to gather taxes from the people of Canada so that that money may be put into the different departments and, to a large extent, squandered as in the past few years it has been squandered. Does the minister propose to establish an all-red route, an all-red cable, and extend, as he seems to be willing to extend, the carrying of mails into foreign countries at a nominal charge? There is no talk of these propositions not paying, nothing is said with reference to the subsidies and steamship subventions which amounted to over $1,250,000 last year, for the carriage of mails into foreign countries. We hear nothing of these services not paying, and it is our duty to see that the men living in the rurai districts, the men who pay two-thirds ot the taxes that enable the government to carry on the public service, receive better facilities for the delivery of mail so that they may enjoy some of the advantages which are granted to the cities in Canada.

I know that the Postmaster General will say that we have been improving the postal service, that we have been increasing the number of postoffices in the scattered districts of Canada and to some extent in the thickly settled portions. That may all be true, but the minister knows full well that

if we examine into this question more thoroughly he will find in Ontario some 40,000 square miles of thickly settled country in the rural districts of Ontario in which he could satisfactorily establish rural free mail delivery. He might also find in Quebec some 30,000 square miles of similar territory and then he might go to the maritime provinces or to the western provinces. When the minister thinks this is not a live question in the western provinces, he is sadly mistaken, because he must remember that large numbers of people are coming into those provinces from the United States who have been accustomed to these advantages in the United States and who feel the need of like advantages in Canada. It is only fair and reasonable that the people of the rural districts, who contribute so much of the money which permits the free delivery in cities, should enjoy similar advantages to those enjoyed by residents of cities. We cannot but appreciate that the men living in the rural districts are justified in urging on the government the ne cessity of the extension of this system.

Let us glance at the progress that they are making in the United States. Some 900 counties are to-day entirely covered by rural free mail delivery, and where necessary the postoffices have been dispensed with, saving a large amount of money. The star-route system which the minister claims to be established in Canada is not employed in the United States except in the most sparsely settled portions which enjoy free delivery. According to the statement of the minister, 44 routes have already been established in Canada and the actual cost to the department has been only $663 per annum. $663 per annum is the estimate given by the Postmaster General for the establishment of 44 routes, which amounts to an average of ouly $15.06 per route. Does the minister think that this is an extravagant proposition? Does he think it would involve a -tremendous drain on the revenue of his department if he did likewise in the thickly settled districts of this country? I am satisfied that when he investigates this question, and I hope he will, he will see that we are not asking anything out of reason in regard to the establishment of this system in Canada.

Now, let us look a little further. The minister tells us that the system in the United States is a very expensive system. I would like to refer to a previous debate in this House in which the minister tried to becloud the issue and to lead the people of Canada to believe that this system was so expensive that we could not possibly think of undertaking it in the Dominion at this session of parliament. I am

satisfied that when he examines the reports of the United States he will no longer compare the Dominion of Canada, with its six millions of people, with the United States with its eighty-five millions, and he will not hold up before our people the expenditure of $35,000,000 in the United States for the purpose of frightening us and telling us that it would bankrupt Canada if we were to expend any such amount of money. Does the hon. gentleman not realize the fact that 18,000,000 of people in the United States are being served by (rural free . mail delivery, and tihat the $35,000,000 that are being spent on the system amounts to only $2 for each family that is being served? But that does not take into account the income received by the Post Office Department for the sale of stamps to people in those rural districts, and the amount of money that is spent on stamps in outside districts for sending mail matter to those people who are living in the delivery districts. Let the minister appreciate this fact that last year when there were 40,000 routes in operation supplying 18,000,000 of people the system covered 1,000,000 miles of road; the carriers covered an aggregate of 200,000,000 miles and 2,000,000,000 pieces of mail were handled by the rural free mail delivery carriers on those 40,000 routes. Does the minister not realize that in handling this enormous amount of mail matter. there is an enormous revenue coming into the department from the stamps that are sold, both to the people who send the mail and the people who reside in those rural districts? Now, the amount of revenue that comes into the Post Office Department from those 2,000,000,000 pieces of mail matter only represents a cost to the people of $2 per head. It is evident when you take into consideration the enormous revenue that is gathered under this system that the people of the United States do not look upon rural districts as being producers of deficits, but the reverse. Only a year or two ago the Postmaster General of the United States stated that instead of the rural free mail delivery system being a deficit producer, it is a revenue producer. I would remind the hon. gentleman that the President of the United States distinctly urged upon Congress the necessity of extending this system, and giving a better service and a more expensive service even than they have at the present time.

But the minister will say they had a deficit of $16,000,000 last year. That is true. The increase in the post office revenue for the last number of years has exceeded over 9 per cent, while last year the increase did not exceed 4'24 per cent. But if he will take into consideration the fact that over $9,000,000 were paid in increased wages to employees in the Post Office De-Mr. ARMSTRONG.

partment and that there was a falling ofi in the revenue owing to the financial depression in that country, he cannot but conclude that, had it been a normal year and under normal circumstances, there would have been a surplus instead of a deficit. Now, let us look at the matter in another light. In 1896 when the United States government undertook the establishment of rural free mail delivery the deficit in the Post Office Department was over $11,000,000, at a time when they had only expended on the system $14,000. Last year when they were expending $35,000,000, the deficit only amounted to a little over $6,000,000, nearly one-half of what it was when they were expending only $14,000 on the system. I wish to quote from the annual report of the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General made in 1903:

The average number of routes in 50 states and territories was 315. The average number of houses on each route was 137. The average population on each route was 585; the average number of boxes, 70; the average number of patrons, 381; and the average cost cf each route, $597.80.

Those people who oppose the introduction of the system into Canada should take into consideration these figures, which go to show that the United States has not established rural free mail delivery at all in the sparsely settled districts, nor do we on this side of the House urge on the minister to establish rural free mail delivery in any districts but those where the system can be carried on successfully, and that are thickly populated. Now I wish to call the attention of the minister to the fact that it is necessary for him to make a further investigation into this subject. He has been able to go part way, by granting rural free mail delivery to a portion of the country. But there is no doubt in my mind that, before many years pass, he will be compelled by public opinion and by the position the people are taking in many districts to grant this advantage to the thickly-settled portions of Canada generally. The increase in the value of the farms in the United States has been very great where rural free mail delivery has been established. Take a farm worth $5,000; if it increases only five per cent-and prominent men in the United States say that the increase in farm values has been a great deal more than five per cent-there is an increase of $250. If the minister were called upon to spend an average of that amount in delivering mail to the people on these farms it would mean that the farmers could afford to pay $5 a year for fifty years for this great boon. But it is not necessary for them to pay any such amount. I have here the statements published by Mr. Hamilton, of the Toronto ' News,' who gathered a great mass of facts in regard to the establishment of rural mail

delivery in the county of Lincoln. I need not tell the minister that many counties in the eastern provinces of the Dominion have what are called militia maps These maps show exactly the number of homes on the different roads. By the aid of such maps, you could lay out routes for free mail delivery that would cover the county completely. The minister, of course, is aware of this fact. I wish I had time to place on record the splendid material which has been gathered concerning the county of Lincoln by Mr. Hamilton. But I may say that he has shown that sixteen routes would cover the county, and that the cost to the people of that county would not exceed fifty cents per head over the cost of the present system. Lincoln is not thickly populated, for if the minister will investigate the figures, he will find that there are only thirty-four families to the mile. After studying these facts, as I have done, I cannot come to any other conclusion than that we have in the Dominion of Canada at least 1,700,000 living in the rural districts who could be successfully served by a rural free mail delivery system. If we take the minister's system of delivery-in the county of Lincoln, even if it were thoroughly carried out there would be only 600 people who would be reached, while 2,500 people, who have as good a right to mail deliveries as the others, would be compelled to do without it. I only call these matters to the attention of the minister, that he may investigate the matter more fully. If he will do so, I am satisfied that he can only come to one conclusion, the conclusion that I reached many years ago-that it is time for us not only to investigate this matter but to make the system part of the Post Office Department for the benefit of our people generally.

There is another matter of which I wish to speak. I would urge upon the Postmaster General (Mr. Lemieux) the necessity of investigating the mail matter that is coming into this country under the British preference. I wish I could bring the minister to see the necessity of appointing a board whose duties would be to cause to be examined practically every bit of literature coming into this Dominion. There is no doubt in my mind that masses of literature are coming into this country whose only tendency is to degrade and demoralize the people. The Postmaster General can go to the bookstores of this very city and find stacked up there the cheap novels coming from Great Britain, and also the cheap Weekly periodicals, whose influence upon the people is so injurious. The Minister of Customs (Mr. Paterson) said, a few days ago, that the amount of material coming through his department in the shape of books and novels was $350,000 worth, and that the cheap periodicals and papers came in free. While the Postmaster General may try to saddle the Minister of Customs with some responsibility in this regard, I cannot but feel that we should have a board of censors. For, though you put your best and ablest men to teach in your colleges, to nreach in your pulpits, to lead in your sabbath schools, yet you may depend upon it that, if you allow the literature that is now coming into this country to continue to come in. much of the good that our best institutions would bring to the people will be neutralized.

Another suggestion I would make to the Postmaster General is this: We need inspectors in the Post Office Department. The Postmaster General may say that he already has inspectors in the different districts of the Dominion. That is true. But their duties are so heavy that they are not able to go into the rural districts and examine the post offices. What we need is a body of inspectors whose powers are as wide as the Post Office Department can possibly grant, and whose duties will be to go into the different post offices, examine the systems in use, look into the finances, consider the different postal routes and in every way seek to improve the carrying and distribution of the mail.

But that which I wish particularly to impress upon the minister is what I have said in regard to the establishment of rural free mail delivery. I sincerely trust the Postmaster General will receive these remarks in the spirit in which they are made, and will investigate this system which is in vogue in the United States. For. I am satisfied, that had the hon. gentleman investigated the systems now in operation in Great Britain, New Zealand, Germany, France, and other countries, he would have found that the best system in vogue for our purposes is that of the United States. The people of that country have had the advantage of the system for the last eleven or twelve years, and it is time that we began to investigate it, to say the least. Surely we will be able to improve upon the position they have been taking because we will be able to benefit by the mistakes made in the past. I would urge on the minister the necessity of investigating this question without further delay.

Topic:   SUPPLY-RURAL FREE MAIL DELIVERY.
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CON

Charles Jonas Thornton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. C. J. THORNTON (Durham).

As a young member, representing a rural constituency, I would like to say a word or two on this question of rural free mail delivery. I feel particularly interested in it because I represent a county which is almost entirely agricultural. I have been impressed with the conviction that there should be something done in the way of giving our agriculturalists better mail facilities. I w'as therefore glad when the government proposed to institute such a system, and I have been pleased with the

spirit which the* hon. Postmaster General has shown towards those members who have seen fit to interview him in connection with postal matters. I must say, without any desire to flatter, that I think the Postmaster General is anxious to serve the people and the rural constituencies in the best manner possible. But in looking over the matter, I must say that it does not appear to me that a comprehensive plan of rural free mail delivery has been inaugurated by the minister such as we should have had. Looking at the conditions in my own county, it appears to me that the plan devised by the minister is one which benefits an already favoured class. Take my own county as an example, and what applies to my county will apply to nearly all the rural constituencies in Canada. In my county there are about 140 miles of mail routes, and the people on those routes are the most favoured so far as mail facilities are concerned. They have nearly all of them, and have had for years, a system of rural mail delivery of their own. They pay the mail carrier a yearly sum of from $1 to $2 each, in| return for which he drops their mail in boxes placed at their gates. In my county the residents along the mail route) pay the carrier $1.50 per year for that service. But outside of those mail routes, the great majority of the people have no mail facilities of that kind. Taking my county again, I find that there are about 1,500 miles of travelled roads along which farmers reside, but there are only 140 miles that would be served with free mail delivery, according to the plan laid down in this little pamphlet. These are particularly favoured, while the people on the other 1,350 miles enjoy no such mail facilities. I would like to see the minister bring down a broad, comprehensive plan of rural free mail delivery which would serve the great majority of the agricultural class. I do not say that he could serve all the people, but I do believe that a plan could have been devised which would have given free rural mail delivery to a much larger portion of the agricultural class.

But there is another matter of more importance, and that is that there are large communities of wealthy, tax-paying people who are without any postal facilities whatever. What I mean by that is that they live long distances from the post office. There are communities in which there are large thickly settled districts of comparatively wealthy people, who contribute largely, directly and indirectly, to the revenues of the country, and who have not anything like efficient postal service. In my opinion it should be the first duty of the Postmaster General to see that these communities are served before any system of rural free mail delivery is instituted.

There is another question of importance to my mind, and that is the inadequate Mr. THORNTON.

compensation paid our rural postmasters. I know that there was a re-adjustment of the scale of remuneration paid to postmasters a few years ago and that the postmasters get more now than they did previously. But I want to point out that while the revenues from many of our country post offices have not increased, the work has increased three-fold. I need but mention but one office in my own county, which is a fair sample of many of them. The work in connection with that office has been increased three-fold inside of twenty-five years, while the revenue has not increased. Twenty-five years ago we had only one daily paper and to-day we have twenty-five. Twenty-five years ago there were twenty-five weekly papers taken at that post office and there are a hundred and twenty to-day. And then we have to-day catalogues and circulars by the hundreds and thousands delivered at that office. Twenty-five years ago we had none of these. I know, as a matter of fact, that it takes in that office one person, seven to eight hours a day delivering postal matter, and for this he is paid some $35 a year or about 11 cents a day, and there has always to be some person in attendance. That is one of the things which should engage the attention of the Department of the Postmaster General.

There is another matter of importance, and that is the re-arranging of the postal route. In my own county there is a mail delivery at a certain point on the Canadian Pacific Railway and the mail from that point, which is a distributing office leaves that office at 11 a.m. by horse and buggy, and delivers mail at a certain office on the rcute at 4 o'clock, p.m. Now, at that very point there is a mail train passing within a stone's throw of that office at 11.40 in the forenoon and there could be a mail delievered at that office at that hour, instead of waiting until a horse travels 11 or 12 miles to reach the office at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. We are away behind the times when we allow such a state of things to exist. Unfortunately this is not an isolated case for there are very many others all over the country. Now, first of all I would like to see a good comprehensive system of free mail delivery, but before that I would like to see postal facilities given to many communities who have no adequate postal facilities to-day and who need them badly. In the second place I would like to see better remuneration paid the country postmasters, and in the third place I would urge a re-arrangement of the postal routes so as to give the people the very best facilities for the delivery of mail matter. I hope the Postmaster General will give these matters his best attention.

Topic:   SUPPLY-RURAL FREE MAIL DELIVERY.
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March 17, 1909