February 10, 1909

LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. BRODEUR.

(Translation.) Certainly. They are: Rene Dupont, Quebec; J. B. Carbonneau, Biddeford. Maine; C. A. Laurier, Marquette, Maine; Romuald Laurier, 114 rue Dudley, Foxburg, Mass.; Damase Gauthier, Laurentides, Que.; O. Tessier, Saginaw, Mich.; W. H. Beaudry, Mass.; Alex. Ayotte, Great Falls, Mont.; M. L'abbe L. P. Gravel, Gravelburg, Sask.; M. L'Abbe E. E. Gauthier, Pawtucket, R. I.; M. L'Abbe J. A. Ouellette, Montreal, Que.

It must be remembered that the address of some of these agents is in Canada, but that their field of action is in the United States.

The hon. member for Jacques Cartier says that we have no agents in the eastern states. If he will refer to the report of Mr. Damase Gauthier, he will be convinced of the contrary.

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CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

(Translation.) What is Gauthier's salary? It must be at least $400.

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LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. BRODEUR.

(Translation.) At least $1,200.

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CON
LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. BRODEUR.

(Translation.) My hon. friend has given many denials; he can afford to give one more. Let us see what is said in the report of the Rev. M. Blais for the year 1902-1903, page 145:

Besides the repatriation of a large number of our people, I have succeeded in moulding the opinion of the leading class to the advantages of the Canadian west, in interesting them in my work, which will make it easier

for me with a large number of persons who think seriously of coming hack to Canada.

In his report Rev. M. Vachon, says:

I have continued during the last year the work taken up in previous years, that is, of lecturing in the western states among the most prosperous French settlements in farming districts. The result, I am pleased to say has been satisfactory with regard to the quality and quantity of settlers. Those emigrants formerly from Canada form a very desirable class of settlers, as they are men who have acquired fortune and experience m farming in the United States. I may say that the interest in the northwest is increasing among the French people; this is evidenced by the numerous invitations sent to me from different parts of the country to lecture on Canada. One of these invitations came from as far as Butte City, Montana; I took advantage of this invitation tendered to me to go and lecture in several French settlements of Montana, and not without effect, as it is noticed that the large percentage of French set-lers from that direction is higher this yeaj' than previously.

Let us look, now, to the report of Mr. Ridout, for the year 1904-1905, page 87:

I must say that through, the eastern states that I have visited the majority of the French population is anxious to come back and see our new settlements in Canada. During my lectures I have called the attention of my audience to the advantages that can be found on the settlements in New Ontario, districts of Nipissing and Algoma, Northern Timiskaming and county of Pontiac, province of Quebec.

And the report of Mr. John Hoolahan :

It is a satisfaction to be able to state that the repatriation of French Canadians goes steadily on. While many of these return to tlieir old homes in Quebec and eastern Ontario, a large percentage now turn their steps to the Northwest.

Mr. O'Corbeil says:

I went to Nashua, Manchester and Concord, where the French Canadians are in large numbers and are asking for more information. As a result on that trip, the numerous letters that I receive and the numerous applications that are coming in for literature are good proofs that the repatriation of French Canadians is larger than ever, and is still increasing on account of these people being better informed as to the Canadian west.

Mr. Carbonneau in his report says:

The prospects for this bureau, which is chiefly concerned in the repatriation of the largest number of French Canadians, are most encouraging. Curing the financial year I have delivered certificates for 405 persons representing 134 families, whose intention are to settle in western Canada or in the province of Quebec, and whose aggregate capital is $48,000.

It can be seen by these reports that our agents have done much for the cause of re-

patriation, not only in the eastern states, but also in the west. It is a well known fact, that there are a great many Canadians in the western states, and the work done in these parts of the country helps also the repatriation in the east and directs the Canadians from the American west to the Canadian west

I will give some statistics to prove my contention. If the hon. member for Jacques Cartier will look at the report of 190304, he will see that 4,432 Canadians have returned to this country. In 1904-1905, 3,613 have returned.

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CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

(Translation.) What is your authority for that ?

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LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. BRODEUR.

(Translation.) The official reports. The proportion in 1904, was 9'8 per cent.; in 1905, 8 3 per cent.; in 1906, 5,000, or 8:6 per cent.; in 1906-7, 2,502, or 7-3 per cent.; in 1907-08, 5,160, or 8-8 per cent. The total for the five years was 20,707 repatriated Canadians, or 9 per cent.

I will now give extracts from the report of the Colonization Society of Montreal.

In 1898, 68 Canadian were brought back from the United States, thanks to the efforts of that association. In 1899, we had 31. In 1900, 92; in 1901, 102; in 1902, 149in 1903 ,119; in 1904, 228; in 1905, 295; in 1906, 310; in 1907, 330. So, in the ten years, 1,715 Canadians left the United States and have settled in the new parts of this country, thanks to the good work of this association. These statistics are taken from the report of the secretary, dated March 3, 1908.

Have we not in these reports the proof that the government have done their duty towards the cause of the repatriation of the French Canadians living in the United States, and that my hon. friend was entirely mistaken when he said that we have done nothing for our fellow-countrymen. I think I have established that the Conservative government have done nothing, while the Liberal administration have appointed agents and subagents in the United States to bring back our fellow-countrymen to this country.

My hon. friend ought to know, that the time is no more when one could raise the racial and religious cry about immigration. His friends from the Pacific coast devote their time to denounce oriental immigration and his friends of the province of Quebec are chiefly concerned in creating racial prejudices against the government, with that same question of immigration.

M. PAQUET. (Translation.) What justification has the hon. minister to say that the friends of the hon. member for Jacques Cartier are endeavouring to create racial prejudices about immigration? Have I done so in discussing this question the way I have discussed it this afternoon?

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LIB
LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. BRODEUR.

(Translation.) I say that in the province of Quebec and in British Columbia, the racial cry is being raised about immigration. In British Columbia, they went as far as forging telegrams to create the impression that the head of the Conservative party was totally opposed to oriental immigration. Can my hon. friend deny that? What does he think of his friends who resort to such means?

On the other hand, in the province of Quebec, they are trying to stir the prejudices of the French population under the pretense that the federal governement are not doing their duty.

I think I have established, figures in hand, that the government and the Minister of the Interior, have done all in their power, not only for the repatriation of our fellow-countrymen, but also to attract to this country the greatest possible number of desirable immigrants.

M. NANTEL (Terrebonne). (Translation.) Mr. Speaker, I confess that I had no intention of taking part in this discussion. I can say further, that I had not the least suspicion that the academic speech of the hon. member for L'Islet (Mr. Pa-quet) would be followed by such an animated debate. I am inclined to think that politics are not always the best of things. The discussion started on lines acceptable to all and it seems to me that there should be only one way of thinking on this question. It is quite clear to my mind that the government must take the means of settling this immense country of ours.

They are in duty bound to direct immigration from the best sources, to lay the foundations of a great Canadian nation. Then, can they go at a better source, than in endeavouring to bring back to this country those who have left it? The government have done good work in that direction; they are entitled to our felicitations for it. I hope they will continue in the same strain.

The hon. Minister of Marine and Fisheries (Mr. Brodeur) said that within ten years, 1,700 Canadians had been brought back to this country. The result is not amazing.

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LIB

Louis-Philippe Brodeur (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. BRODEUR.

(Translation.) By the Colonization Society of Montreal, alone.

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CON

Wilfrid Bruno Nantel

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NANTEL.

(Translation.) But, may I ask how many strangers have been brought in this country, for the last few years that will never become assimilated and will be a lasting menace for the Canadian race, be it in the east or in the west? I do not care to mention any race in particular, but nobody can deny that the danger exists.

The hon. Minister of Marine and Fisheries said that the government have at-

tracted a large number of American citizens in western Canada. I know that, and I am inclined to think that, on principle, it is not a desirable immigration. I do not suppose that these immigrants will ever become strongly attached to Canada. They come here to operate the great natural resources of the country, to make money with the preconceived idea of re-tuming to their former homes. For those who do stay, they will always think more of the stars and stripes than of the Canadian flag. .

The same thing cannot be said of the French Canadians who have emigrated to the United States. They are favourably disposed towards us. They are people of the same blood. They will become patriotic citizens, always ready to stand by the

repeat that the government have done a good deal, but that they can do much more and I am bound to say that if politics were eliminated from the question, it would be an easy task to direct towards this country a large number of desirable immigrants from the republic to the south.

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LIB

Jacques Bureau (Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. JACQUES BUREAU (Solicitor General).

(Translation). Mr. Speaker, I do not intend to detain the House very long. I simply wish to make a few remarks on the speeches delivered by the hon. members for Jacques Cartier and Terrebonne. As to my hon. friend from L'Islet, it seemed to me as if I was listening to some of the speeches he had already delivered during the last elections, I do not think there is any condemnation of the government policy in the words he has uttered. He has recalled to mind the struggles of the French Canadians, the wrongs they had to suffer and from whom the latter came.

The discussion of this question has taken a new turn when the hon. member for Jacques Cartier rose on his feet. This question of repatriation is one which deserves serious consideration and which every one of us has at heart. My hon. friend from Jacques Cartier said a while ago that it is always timely to discuss that question, and he asked: who are those who look after it? In answer to him, I may quote the old saying that actions are more eloquent than words. If we have not raised this question it is because we were taking action. As the hon. Minister of Marine said, we have appointed immigration agents in New England to bring back the French Canadians from the United States, and thereby a new movement was determined.

We all agree upon one point:.we all want the French Canadians to come back in this country. The hon. member for L'Islet said he did not intend to criticise the government policy, but simply wished to state that the amount spent for French immigration literature is very small ^indeed. I hold in my hand a statement prepared from the

records of the Immigration Department which shows that last year there were minted and distributed, at a cost of $7,935. about 257,000 French pamphlets in order to encourage the French Canadians to come back to this country.

The only means suggested by the hon. member for L'Islet is to start a concerted action intended to cause such a prosperity as would bring back our compatriots. For him it seems useless to send agents in the United States in order to have the -country advertised by the means of lectures on our fertile soil and valuable lands.

I do not think this government can be charged with not having changed the conditions since 1396. Moreover, the Postmaster General has stated a while ago how matters were standing in spite of the contrary statements made by my hon. friend from Jacques Cartier who in order to support his theory is willing to see in the closed summer houses of those who go and spend the country-season on the shores of the Richelieu river a proof that French Canadians are moving to the United States.

My hon. friend has a sensible soul and a great heart, but whenever he is in need of arguments, his imagination is ouick at work. In 1900 or 1903, I took part in a bv-election in Argenteuil caused by Mr. Christie's death [DOT] there I met the former member for Beauharnois, Mr. Bergeron, and my hon. friend from Jacques Cartier. The latter was deploring in every respect the presence of Doukhobors in Canada; such was his hobby and he could not get rid of it. He was denouncing the government and it was a great sight indeed to see him raising his arms to heaven while calling attention to that dreadful thing. He came back to it today; that was unavoidable. As to -the remedy suggested by the hon. member for L'Islet, I do not think that it would better the situation in any respect.

Before I resume my seat I have just one word more to add. The hon. member for Terrebonne (Mr. Nantel) has just said that we must be very cautious in the selection of immigrants. He said amongst other things that certain immigrants he did not wish to designate were a danger for Canadians. Speaking of Americans from the west who come and settle in Canada, he gave us to understand that their coming was entirely dangerous for the future of the country.

Let me tell him that under the Conservative government, before 1896, I was, like many others, obliged to go and earn in a foreign land the living I could not earn in this country. I have lived in the west, I have known personally the western Americans, and I must say that there are no more loyal, honest, energetic, and intelligent men in the world than these Americans. I wish that the lands of Canada could be peopled with Americans coming from the -west. I assert positively that the man working in the Dakota plains or in the

Minnesota mines is not inferior in any respect to French Canadians or any other nationality. I am sorry the hon. member for Terrebonne has thought fit to offer such remarks.

Having made these few observations, Mr. Speaker, I resume my seat and congratulate my hon. friend from L'Islet for his admission that the government have done their duty.

Mr. 0. E. TALBOT (Bellechasse).-(Translation.)-I can only congratulate the hon. member for LTslet at least for the form of the speech delivered by him this afternoon.

This question of immigration is one that is discussed throughout the country, and is particularly important for us, from the province of Quebec, who have a large number of our campatriots in the United States contributing to the increase of our neighbours' welfare.

Like the hon. Solicitor General, I have, together with six brothers of mine, been compelled by the Conservative policy to go and earn in a foreign country the living we could not find in our native land. Those who had to gain their living that way know how hard it is, when the mind is suffering from the absence of a home left behind. The constant thought of those who live in the United States, a great many at least, is to come back in their native country.

I can only congratulate my hon. friend from L'Islet for the form of his speech; but I regret the turn the statements made by the hon. member for Jacques Cartier bave given to this debate. Did we not hear enough about the Doukhobors during the last federal elections? From north to south, the echoes of the mountains in the province of Quebec are still resounding with the speeches made by the Conservative candidate. The hon. member for L'Islet himself took delight in representing these Doukhobors as fanatical and insane people looking after Christ through the plains of the west.

Every one of us can remember the famous tour made by the hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Borden). In Valleyfield, the hon. gentleman uttered certain words the, hon. member for Jacques Cartier calls in question. He asked for the proof of such words. I am going to quote for his information the speech the hon. member for Cape Breton (Mr. Johnston) delivered in this House on the 15th January, 1908, and wherein may be found the remarks made by the hon. leader of the opposition. The words in question are found in pages 1340 and 1341 of ' Hansard ':

Speaking at Valleyfield, in the province of Quebec, the leader of the opposition criticised certain peoples that were coming into the great northwest. On the 2nd of September last, as reported, not in any Grit paper, but by his own organ-sometimes-the Montreal 'Gazette,' he said:

' Between the east and the west there is a vast stretch of territory that could be peo-Mr. BUREAU.

pled, and there was danger of the two seotions of the country becoming antagonistic to each other. Under these circumstances he thought it most unwise to crowd into the west as the government was doing a class of undesirable immigrants, Galicians, Bohemians, Eoukho-bors, &c., who did not understand our customs and did not readily assimilate either with the French or English elements of Canada.'

And Mr. Johnston added:

I heard him, I think the next night in Montreal, after I had read this report of his speech and I listened attentively to see whether or not he would correct the report of his speech in the 'Gazette' of that day; but he did not, on the contrary he went on to address himself to the people in Montreal in very nearly the same way.

Winding up his great journey through the western country, how did the leader of the opposition express himself, he who had reviled the Galicians, Doukhobors and Bohemians ? Let us see what Mr. Johnston says:

The next day Mr. Borden made a statement in the Winnipeg ' Telegram ' as follows-and I want the House to pay particular attention to his words:

' While I am in the west

He had left the west and had still hope that what he said in the west would not be lead in the east.

' While I am in the west I wish to say that in respect to the question of immigration, the report which is attributed to me as referring to certain nationalities as undesirable is quite inaccurate.'

The interview was reported by the Winnipeg ' Telegram,' of the 8th of September last, and it is exactly in the words I have placed before the House. It is worth while calling the attention of the country once more to these words.

It will thus be seen that the leader of the opposition expressed himself one way while in the east and another way when in the west. The member for Jacques Cartier (Mr. Monk) stated that there were still in the province of Quebec unoccupied houses. I belong to a county which has been for years and years depopulated by emigration. The flower of its youth have departed to the United States, as farming was no longer remunerative for poor husbandmen burdened with numerous children. All that these good people could say to their boys was: How can you expect me to lend you a hand in acquirement of a farm in the new districts, when myself on the old family homestead, I am unable to provide the requisite education and the necessary clothing.' What inducement was there to bring back to Canada those whom the policy in force at the time had caused to depart ? To-day farming is in such a prosperous condition, that the head of a family will not suffer his boy to depart, and provides him with land at a cost of four or five thousand dollars. The shefiff at Quebec informed me

not very long ago that for three months previous there had not been a single compulsory sale in his district. I have been a farmer myself, and had the sorrow of seeing my property sold by the sheriff. What was the cause of it ? At the time there was no sale for the products of the farm. In one of the newly settled parishes of my county, a farmer was telling me a short time ago that formerly he was in debt four or five hundred dollars, while at the time of his speaking he had five or six hundred dollars in the bank. There is one other circumstance which the member for Jacques Cartier, did not mention: That while there may still be some houses unoccupied, it is not on account of their owners having gone to the United States, but because they have taken up their abode in large cities such as Montreal or Quebec. I make this statement without fear of being contradicted, as for every Canadian going to the United States, there are five coming back.

The member for L'lslet knows by what means he has succeeded in winning at the polls. He has been unceasing in his encomiums of the government; especially has he made the welkin ring with the five votes cast by him for the government, and above all the vote in favour of the French treaty. He has been untiring in his vindication of his spirit of independence. In the speech which he has just delivered to-day, and which is perfect as to form, I detect the same practice of resorting to insinuation.

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CON

Eugène Paquet

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PAQUET.

-(Translation.)-Is the hon.

member in a position to point out to a single error appearing in my speech?

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LIB

Onésiphore Ernest Talbot

Liberal

Mr. TALBOT.

-(Translation.)-There is no error for me to point out; I congratulate the hon. member on having paid his respects to the government.

I have a word to say in answer to the member for Terrebonne, in reference to the exodus from the United States to the Canadian west. These settlers are among all others particularly intelligent and energetic. If the member for Terrebonne will look into the statistics, he will find that in the interval of two years, about 200,000 have entered Canada, bringing with them capital to the amount of more than $100,000,000 in cash, stock and personal property. They are very desirable immigrants who will continue accumulating wealth and will contribute to our country's prosperity.

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LIB

Emmanuel Berchmans Devlin

Liberal

Mr. E. B. DEVLIN (Wright).

-(Translation.)-I have listened with a great deal of attention and pleasure to the speeches delivered this afternoon. It must have been highly gratifying to you, Mr. Speaker, to hear those speeches in the beautiful tongue of your ancestors, the tongue of Molifre, and I feel that it would be unbecoming on my part to break the harmonious flow of this debate by using another tongue than

the French for the few remarks I wish to make. Many things of practical interest have been said this afternoon, but I expected something more from the mouths of the hon. members for L'Islet and Jacques Cartier. It seems there is not a single Conservative member in this House apart from these two gentlemen who is in favour of a scheme for the repatriation of French Canadians.

During the general election, particularly in the province of Quebec, a great deal has been said about immigration and especially the Doukhobors. I must admit that I am not in favour of bringing here from the continent of Europe immigrants of the class we have had coming to this country, who are of nomadic habits, and, under the pretense of religion, put us to shame. But, on the other hand, it should be acknowledged that when a government is doing every thing in its power to bring about the settlement of those immense territories of Alberta and Saskatchewan, it is not always an easy matter to select only desirable settlers among the thousands and thousands of immigrants who present themselves. I heartily endorse the opinion expressed by the hon. member for L'Islet and by the hon. member for Jacques Cartier in reference to this matter of repatriation.

.1 am in favour of forwarding the repatriation of French Canadians settled in the United States in preference to bringing here immigrants from the continent of Europe. I think we should spend large amounts towards developing transportation facilities in order to enable Canadians to take up lands in the Northwest. It should be admitted that there are great difficulties to be overcome by the government especially when they have to deal with such an important question as that of immigration. Many are the hindrances in the way; every one should have his due, and credit be given to the government whenever the occasion requires.

Only a few weeks ago I had the pleasure of visiting the government offices in Paris. I had a very interesting interview with their agents, particularly with the commissioner, Mr. Fabre, and Messrs. Wiallard and Geof-frion. I got an insight into the work they are carrying on to induce French immigration. I also had an interview with Mr. de Coeli, the Canadian agent in Belgium, in connection with Belgian immigration, and I was favourably impressed with the interest he shows in his work.

The member for L'Islet referred to the establishment of agricultural colleges. He stated that the Dominion government should help in the establishment of such colleges. I hope the member for L'Islet will cross over the interprovincial bridge and visit the property owned in former times by the Conservative ex-representative of

the county, the late Alonzo Wright. He will find there one of the finest colleges in the province of Quebec, essentially agricultural, established by the fathers of the Holy Ghost, for the purpose of imparting a knowedge of farming to our French-speaking young men.

I do not wish to take up the time of the House, although this question is one of interest, not only to the people of Quebec, but to the whole of Canada. Knowing that the government are doing all they possibly can in the way of repatriation, I have ventured to open my mouth with the sole object of encouraging to the best of my powers the government in the national and patriotic work they are carrying on, now that we have at the helm the greatest and most distinguished of the French Canadians. I am anxious to show to our French Canadian friends that the Irish are in sympathy with them and that the Liberal party is anxious to promote at all times their welfare.

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Mr. C.@

ROY (Montmagny.)-(Translation.)-Mr. Speaker, being a new member I hope I may be permitted to say a few words on the question of repatriation, a matter which has been brought to the attention of the House by the representative of the county adjoining my own constituency. I refer to the member for L'Islet. It is the first time I have the honour to address the House, and I must acknowledge my surprise at finding that, in reference to a question concerning which there seems to be no room for difference, hon. members are nevertheless at variance. I did not expect to find politics mixed up in a question of such national importance.

I should congratulate my neighbour the member for L'Islet, who has confined himself to dealing with the question of repatriation. But what side of the House is responsible for introducing politics into this debate? I must say that it is that side of the House where I occupy a seat, where I have been relegated as a result of the last election; but it should not be inferred from that that I shall be often in harmony with the majority of those who sit on this side of the House. The member for L'Islet has not shown any prejudice, but I am unable to pay the same compliment to the member for Jacques Cartier, who I believe has confused the question of immigration with that of repatriation.

The object the member for L'Islet had in mind was to draw the attention of the House to that national work, the repatriation of our brethern living in the United States. The member for Jacques Cartier, in answer to the Postmaster General, stated that the Conservative government, prior to 1896. had done something towards bringing about repatriation. He wished to give credit to his party to having sent $110,000 towards Mr. DEVLIN.

promoting immigration. For the sake of fairness he should have credited the Liberal government with having increased the amount expended on repatriation as well as on immigration.

Reference has been made to abandoned houses in Rouville county. My constituency adjoins that of L'Islet; I am just as familiar with the county of Bellechasse as with that of Montmagny, and I may say right here that for the last ten or twelve years there has not been any abandoned houses whose owners had been constrained to leave the country and settle in the United States. True, as stated by the member for Bellechasse, there are still to be seen aban-dond houses, but they are more a matter of congratulation to the government, since the owners of these houses have emigrated to our cities where, owing to the policy pursued by the government, they are enabled to make a living instead of settling in the United States. _

The member for Quebec west (Mr. Price), owner of a large saw-mill in the county of Montmagny, will be able to support me when I say that if the population of the town of Montmagny has considerably increased, it is owing to the fact that the inhabitants of Saint Thomas have left their homes to take advantage of the rise in salaries paid to mill hands.

The hon. member from Terrebonne said that it was better to have the Canadians coming back to this country than to receive foreigners. It would be better to have our poor fellow countrymen back from the United States, if they so desire, because the opportunity of doing so was given to them as agents were appointed in the United States. If there were no agents as there are, thanks to the policy of the government who undertook to make Canada known at the various exhibitions, not by sending there bands of Indians nor by any other similar doings capable of stirring curiosity but by displaying exhibits of such a character as to draw the attention upon Canada, they would still attain their end by the important display of our products.

The hon. member from Jacques Cartier found fault with the government because they intended to exercise their patronage^ in the appointment of their immigration agents; then he asserted that the wages paid to the agents in the United States were too low. If those wages are too low, as the hon. member from Jacques _ Cartier says, what becomes of his pretension that the government wanted to have a little patronage to exercise ? That is an inconsistency which I am unable to understand and which shows that the hon. member is not in earnest.

I shall say no more. As a French Canadian, first, and as a Canadian without any other qualification, I sincerely wish that

our brethren from the United States come back in larger numbers than heretofore.

In concluding, I shall say that the government cannot be blamed, that they fulfilled their duty by appointing agents and that every year the number of our fellow-countrymen who have come back has increased.

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LIB

Joseph Arthur Calixte Éthier

Liberal

Mr. J. A. ETHIER (Two Mountains).

- (Translation.)-Mr. Speaker, the hon.

member from L'Islet has seen fit to put upon the orders of the day a notice of motion for the production of papers which virtually summarize the different questions he has asked during the last parliament. Whether he has voluntarily or unvoluntarily forgotten the answers given by the Minister of the Interior, I do not know, although I am bound to congratulate him upon the tone of the speech he has delivered to-day. Had he omitted the insinuations which we have detected in his remarks, they would have been brought forward by the hon. member from Jacques Cartier. As the Postmaster General says, those innuendoes having been repeated by the hon. member from Jacques Cartier, the remarks of the hon. gentleman from L'Islet have lost a good deal of importance. -

The hon. gentleman from Jacques Cartier has contradicted to a certain extent the statements of the hon. member from L'Islet. It is not my intention to go over every detail, but I cannot help recalling to these two gentlemen what happened in 1907. Here is what I find on page 6930 of the ' Hansard ' of that year :

Generally speaking, the exodus towards the United States has perceptibly decreased, if it has not entirely come to an end, since ten years in New England. There is still here and there an exodus towards the United States, but as I have said, the number of our people going to the United States is considerably less.

Now, the hon. member for Jacques Cartier was contending a moment ago that the exodus of our fellow-countrymen towards the United States was still going on. I assert that those words of the hon. o-entleman from L'Islet which I have just quoted are inconsistent with the statements made to-day by the hon. member from Jacques Cartier.' We have it from the member for L'Islet that the exodus towards the United States has come to an end ten years ago, still the member from Jacques Cartier holds otherwise.

I understand that the hon. member from L'Islet in moving for a copy of all correspondence, returns, and documents between the Denartment of the Interior and the immigration agents in the United States, and between the Department of the Interior and the colonization societies since the first of January, 1908, seeks information which has already been given to him. In any case, it is a matter of colonization and repatriation relating to Canada and the United

States, and to the province of Quebec especially, not to Doukhobors and Galicians to whom the member from Jacques Cartier has referred to his speech.

As the hon. gentleman from Bellechasse says, the member from L'Islet during the last elections gloried in having sometimes voted with the government, and in the statements he had made in the House; he held that as a token of his independence. But now he finds fault with the policy of the administration as his friend from Terrebonne has also done. My opponent at the last election was flying the same colours, repeatedly saying and asserting on every busting that the government was sacrificing the French Canadian for the sake of the Doukhobors and the Galicians who, in his opinion, were nothing but low debauched people that ought to be driven away from this country. Such was the attitude of those gentlemen and such is the way in which the member from L'Islet behaved to further his own interests.

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CON

Eugène Paquet

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PAQUET.

-(Translation.)-Mr. Speaker, has the hon. gentleman the right to say that I have acted in this House so as to further my own interests?

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LIB

Joseph Arthur Calixte Éthier

Liberal

Mr. ETHIER.

-(Translation.)-I made a mistake; I meant his political interests.

The immigration policy of those gentlemen has always been double-faced. They had a policy for the province of Quebec and another policy for the west. Thus, the hon. leader of the opposition had a different policy on immigration during his electoral tour on the eve of the last general elections, a policy reprehensible in Valleyfield and quite acceptable in Winnineg. as far as foreign immigration goes. It was the same thing as in 1896, when Sir Charles Tupner had a double platform on the school question, one for Quebec and the other for Manitoba. I shall now come back to the question. Here is what I find at nage 710 of the Hansard of 1908:

Mr. PA-QUET asked:

1. What amount of money has been paid by the federal government, since January 1, 1900, to the Colonization and Repatriation Society of Montreal ?

2. What amount of money has been paid by the federal government, since January 1, 1900, to the Colonization and Repatriation Society of Lake St. John and of Quebec?

3. What amount of money has been paid by

the federal government, since January 1, 1900, to the Lake St. John Railway Company for the encouragement of repatriation? *

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LIB

Hon. FRANK OLIVER (Minister of the Interior) : (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

1. $25,300.

2. $22,000.

3. $34,000. *

Giving a total sum of $81,300.

Therefore the hon. member from L'Islet has already had from the Minister of the Interior that information he asks for to-day.

These being the facts, they dare say that the government has done nothin" for the repatriation of our fellow-countrymen in the United States.

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February 10, 1909