February 5, 1909

LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

(Translation.) Yes, Mr. O'Halloran, who is deputy minister of the Department of Agriculture, is a lawyer, and he was very prominent at the bar at Montreal.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Wilfrid Bruno Nantel

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NANTEL.

Then, it is a lawyer who fills the charge of deputy minister of Agriculture?

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

Yes, he is a lawyer.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Samuel Simpson Sharpe

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. S. SHARPE.

I have no complaint to make of the officials in the patent office who are very courteous and very obliging, hut it seems to me that they sometimes get the cart before the horse. When an application for a patent goes in, instead of first deciding on the patent ability of the invention they deal with certain informalities in thfe papers. I think the first question to be decided is whether the invention is patentable, and if there is any little informality in the papers they can then be returned. The present system causes great delay and expense and finally the invention may be decided not to be patentable at all.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

I am not very expert in the process of law, but I believe it would lead to very grave irregularities and possi-

bly injury to the applicants for patents if the suggestion of the hon. gentleman were carried out. If a patent were to be issued and there were irregularities in the papers there would certainly be a lawsuit to annul the patent. After having been in the hands of the examiners for a month or six weeks it would be very much more difficult to correct informalities than to have them corrected at once. To make a patent valid, it is absolutely necessary that all the conditions provided by the law shall be followed with exactitude. It would involve the department in a great deal of repetition of work and it would endanger the future of the patent if the suggestion of the hon. gentleman were carried out. The present practice obtains in all patent departments of all countries as well as in Canada, and it is the result of the experience of 40 odd years in issuing patents.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Samuel Simpson Sharpe

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. S. SHARPE.

The informality could be corrected before the patent issue and then there could be no question of the validity of the patent afterwards.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES.

There are advertisements appearing in the farmers' magazines under very peculiar circumstances concerning the distribution of thoroughbred horses. Some time ago a gentleman in Victoria county had a memorandum sent to him asking him to apply for one of these animals when it would be furnished free, and all fees would go into his own pocket. I wrote to the department to ascertain the facts and I received a very satisfactory reply, but I would like to know if the minister has any further information to communicate with reference to this.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

It is a matter which the department officially knows nothing about. These advertisements are not issued by the department nor with any recommendation or guarantee from the department. I understand that some of my officers know these people, and they have said, entirely unofficially, that they believe them to be perfectly honest and honourable people. More than that I cannot say. My hon. friend will quite understand that it would be impossible for the department to aid private enterprise in this way, and this is entirely and absolutely a private enterprise which the department has nothing to do in any shape or form. I have nothing further to say than I have already said with regard to the people concerned in it. Personally I know nothing.

Department of Labour-Salaries, $27,100; contingencies, $1,450.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. R. LEMIEUX (Minister of Labour).

There is an increase of $5,450 in the total amount asked for. First, there is an increase of $1,000 to the deputy head, and an increase of $100 for the secretary of the Mr. FISHER

department. By the way, I may say that since the election of Mr. Mackenzie King as a member of this House, Mr. Acland, the secretary of the department, has been promoted as deputy minister, and a new secretary will be appointed in a few days. There have been some new appointments which, together with the statutory increases, make up the balance of the increase. The Department of Labour has become more important since the operation of the new Compulsory Investigations Act, and more work is thrown upon it.

Printing and Stationery, including printing of 'Labour Gazette,' allowances to correspondents, administration of Conciliation and Labour Act, travelling expenses, &c., and $500 to be paid W. J. Glover as accountant, $30,700.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

This is the same vote as we took last year. The printing of the Labour Gazette, we expect, will absorb $14,200; allowance for correspondents, $5,000; accountant, $500; stationery, $1,800; travelling expenses, $4,000; printing for the department, $2,500; miscellaneous, $2,600. The Labour Gazette is printed by the Printing Bureau, and the estimate is based on a possible issue of 14,000 conies per month. The Labour Gazette is sent to all the institutions in the country, to every member of the House, to our ordinary subscribers* and is sold to the various labour unions. As regards allowances for correspondents, for which we ask $5,100, we have forty correspondents whom we pay $100 per year. We have one legal correspondence who is charged with the duty of making legal reports. We have secured for this service a very eminent lawyer, recommended by the Minister of Justice, whose name I forget at the moment. He receives $300 a year to report specially on labour cases that come before the several courts. We have correspondents in the principal centres of the Dominion. This year we may go a little further. We have been asked by some important centres, especially in the west, to appoint correspondents for those places; but as we had fixed a certain number for the various cities and towns which were entitled to have correspondents, we were debarred from appointing new ones. But when the reorganization of the department takes place, I feel sure that the new minister will extend his favour to some other cities and towns.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES.

In regard to these correspondents, does the service they perform depend entirely upon their own discretion, or are they called upon to contribute certain articles?

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

If the hon. gentleman will look at the last issue of the Labour Gazette, he will see what the work of the correspondents is. They have to report on the special conditions of the labour market of the several centres where they are locat-

ed. They have to inform the Minister of Labour of the scale of wages paid, and the changes that take place, and also report on the accidents that occur. Their work is framed by the department. Especially do they perform the work of statists, that is to say, they gather what we call labour statistics.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES.

Does the department define the answers which the correspondents are to give?

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

Yes.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES.

I notice, for example, that the correspondent at Amherst, N.S., is A. D. Ross. May I ask how it came about that Mr. Ross was appointed?

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

I could not single him out of the 48 and answer the hon. gentleman. The labour correspondents, as a rule, are appointed at the suggestion of the labour unions of the district where they reside. We generally take the best equipped man for that work.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES.

This correspondent would not have been appointed at the instance of the labour union of our county because he is the editor of the Liberal paper in Amherst and has absolutely no knowledge of the labor question beyond what any ordinary individual might have. My remarks in respect to this correspondent are not made in any spirit of factious opposition, but I desire to find out if the department is endeavoring to get the men who are best adapted to make a report upon labour conditions. I would say with all deference that it would occur to me that there are many other men in that district who are much more competent to deal with labour conditions than the gentleman whose name I see here, although that gentleman is a very admirable man within his own particular sphere-that of newspaper work.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

In some districts I have been taken to task by my hon. friends because I have appointed some Tory editors.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES.

I have no objection to this gentleman's politics. I merely mention the fact that his .sphere is newspaper work.. There is no reason why he should give a report upon labour conditions in any better manner than any other individual. In fact he has no special knowledge of the labour conditions, and it would occur to me that if the correspondents throughout the Dominion are chosen from the same field as this man, the usefulness of the Labour Gazette must be very materially impaired.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX.

I shall not make a plea for the Labour Gazette; it speaks for itself. In the last two or three years it has been considerably improved. This is evidenced by the requests that I receive from every part of the country for the free gift of the

Labour Gazette. Of course, subscribers have to pay for it. Generally speaking our correspondents are very fair.

Topic:   SUPPLY-CANADIAN RAILWAYS.
Subtopic:   THE INTERNATIONAL WATERWAYS TREATY.
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February 5, 1909