May 19, 1908

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Some hon. MEMBERS

Hear, hear.

Topic:   SUPPLY-SASKATCHEWAN VALLEY
Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB

John Gillanders Turriff

Liberal

Mr. TURRIFF.

I do not see that there is very much in it. I never met Mr. Griffis as far as I know, I have met Mr. Gilmour once and Mr. Ho ward was a friend of mine. He had failed in business in Winnipeg, was absolutely down on the rocks and he was applying for a lease of coal lands for this particular section. When Gilmour first applied to purchase they could not be sold, as I said, except by public auction but a year or so after, on an ap->

plication by other parties to lease coal lands in other parts of the country, regular tions were made and it was a question, as I said, whether the applications that came in beforehand would be covered by these regulations or not, especially as Gilmour's application was an application to purchase and not to lease if my memory serves me aright. At all events both Gilmour and Howard had withdrawn their applications in favour of Griffis, and I had not the slightest doubt that they had formed a coalition or arrangement among themselves. I had no interest in it one way or another and never had. I do not know who owns the land now and do not know if it was ever worked, X know in fact, nothing about it. I was dealing with it absolutely in an official manner. As to the letters which the hon. member has read, I do not know how he got them, but I will tell you this that when I was in Winnipeg some time after that a gentleman came to me and said: Mr. Gilmour has two private letters of yours that are very compromising, and if you do not give him a grazing lease for which he is an applicant he will publish those letters. I said to this gentleman: You go to Mr. Gilmour and tell him to go plumb.

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. H. B. AMES (St. Antoine).

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for East Assini-boia (Mr. Turriff) did not have the courtesy to notify me that he intended in any way to deal with the question of the Saskatchewan Valley Land Company, and I do not propose to take up the time of the House with any observations on that particular subject; but I propose this afternoon to speak with reference to another matter which has, in one form or another, at various times occupied the attention of this House. Some weeks ago the hon. member for Qu'Appelle (Mr. Lake) made a motion asking for a general investigation into the policy of the present government in respect of the leasing of timber lands in the Canadian Northwest. That matter was Mr. TURRIFF.

discussed and the resolution proposed by the hon. member for Qu'Appelle (Mr. Lake) was voted down. Since that time, however, there have been laid on the table of the House a number of original documents, at that time refused. Since that time too, many returns which had been previously asked for by members on this side of the House have become accessible and a limited inquiry, very much hampered in many ways by the usual obstructionist methods, has been carried on in the Public Accounts Committee and from this and other sources we are now in possession of considerable new information which as yet has not been officially laid before the House and the country. I claim that this new information justifies us in reopening this question and in discussing it from a different point of view this afternon. A number of individual transactions have been examined to ascertain the method in which certain gentlemen, close to the administration, have acquired timber berths. This examination has necessarily been confined to a comparatively few transactions and yet the disclosures which have been made from these investigations are so significant that we cannot pass them over without reviewing them and submitting them to the further examination of the House. The documents and the evidence show that vast areas of timber land have been improvidently alienated and have fallen into the hands of speculators by whom they are held today. The documents and evidence show a series of remarkable coincidences, proving at least that there has been great looseness in the awarding of these timber berths and proving also that the method under which these concessions were granted has been such that it might easily have been taken advantage of by ill-disposed persons, in fact that it opened wide the door to fraud and imposition.

I propose to show this House a number of distances in which the success of the bidders has been so marked, so inexplicable, that it is difficult to find any other reason to account for that success other that there must have been collusion in connection with the granting of limits.

The documents that have been produced and the evidence that has been taken show beyond a doubt that immense areas of timber lands in the Northwest have been improvidently alienated and have fallen into the hands of speculators. Nor is that all. The transactions examined exhibit a series of remarkable coincidences, as yet wholly unaccounted for, disclose a looseness of method in awarding berths by so-called public competition that might easily have been taken advantage of by unscrupulous persons and present evidence of phenomenal success on the part of certain bidders in close relationship to the minister of the day, all of which, to say the least, demands some reasonable explanation.

Within the comparatively short period of three and a half years, between 1902 and 1905, more than three thousand square miles of selected timber, that is to say, about one-half of the entire area under lease in the western provinces, fell into the hands, not of operators, but of speculators. One-half of this amount, comprising 25 percent of the timber of the three provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, was acquired by a group, which may be called the Burrows-Fraser combination, of which the brother-in-law of the then Minister of the Interior was the central figure, and acquired under circumstances so peculiar as to have excited general comment.

An analysis of the holdings of this group shows Mr. T. A. Burrows as having acquired 549 square miles, the Imperial Pulp Company, 417 square miles, the Big River Lumber Company 250 square miles, A. W. Fraser tafias John McBain) 250 square miles, A. W. Fraser, for himself, 120 square miles-in all, 1,586 square miles of selected timber, only 109 square miles of which are being operated, the remainder held presumably for speculatiou.

The extent of the holdings of this favoured group may be illustrated. Were these blocks, nearly 250 in number, selected out of an area many times their size, placed end to end they would form a continuous strip of thick timber one mile wide stretching from Montreal to Winnipeg, or, putting it another way, their combined area would completely cover two of our own counties such as Stanstead and Brome and make them one continuous forest.

Topic:   SUPPLY-SASKATCHEWAN VALLEY
Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB

Theodore Arthur Burrows

Liberal

Mr. BURROWS.

Does the hon. gentleman say that I own 1,600 square miles of timber limit?

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. AMES.

I say that you have been interested in 1,586 square miles of timber limits to my own knowledge, and I do not know how much more beside.

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB
CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. AMES.

To go on with our illustration, on the sworn returns

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB

Theodore Arthur Burrows

Liberal

Mr. BURROWS.

How does the hon. gentleman make out that I own 1,600 square miles of timber limits?

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. AMES.

I shall have nleasure in taking fully an hour to do this. For the year ending the 30th April, 1907, sworn returns furnished the Department of the Interior show that 80 berths in the three provinces, aggregating 1,125 miles, furnished all the sawn lumber marketed during that year. The ex-Minister of the Interior has told us that the supply was ample to cover the demand. Hence we are justified in concluding that 1,200 square miles of timber limits could easily fulfil the present requirements of the three western provinces. The holdings of the Burrows-Fraser group, therefore, are more than sufficient to supply the

entire demand of the western provinces for sawn spruce lumber.

In the acquisition of these limits, under the form of quasi competition then followed by this government, the members of the ' inner circle ' have been remarkably successful. Mr. T. A. Burrows, brother-in-law to the ex-Minister of the Interior, owned in 1901 three limits. Between June of 1902 and June of 1905, Mr. Burrows bid, directly or indirectly, nineteen times for timber berths. He succeeded eighteen times; he failed once. The time he failed to get his limit is one worth considering. It was in respect of berth No. 1050. Mr. Burrows put in an offer of $6,000 and Mr. Macdonald put in a bid of $13,125.

Since June, 1905, Mr. Burrows has but once tested his luck. When berth No. 12S1 was put up to competition he lost, but by a very narrow margin. His single tender of $5,000 was overstopped by a bidder who offered $5,195. Since June, 1805, Mr. Burrows does not appear to have ever tendered, at least not under any recognizable name. Naturally, we ask the reason why-whether it be because all the good timber is already annexed, or whether he does not find the present atmosphere as favourable to his operations as in years gone by.

Now, there is a company known as the Imperial Pulp Company, which has occupied, to a considerable extent, the attention of this House. It is one of those companies-there are many of them ; you will find them in every department-which keeps itself scrupulously hidden, but which has constant dealings for its own profit with the government. This Imperial Pulp Company, which has provoked curiosity and defied inquiry, entered the field as a bidder in December, 1902. It never applied for a limit. Search the records, and you will not find one case where the Imperial Pulp Company, in advance, indicated that they wanted timber; but, during these two years, under diverse names-sometimes the name of one party and sometimes the name of another-the Imperial Pulp Company put in bids nine times, and it never failed to secure the limit it was after every time it put in a bid. So it was the Imperial Pulp Company, this mysterious company, whose identity we could not discover, which had no office, no post office address, except the box in Winnipeg, which did its business through a lawyer and a banker here, signed its letters with a stamp and ' R.R.P.' and could not be found in any business directory on the North American continent, this company went on bidding successfully until it had acquired 417 square miles of limits worth to-day a million dollars, if not more. Now, I took the trouble to add up the offers the Imperial Pulp Company made when they were acquiring limits, and I find the total amount they offered on 9 limits for which they tendered was $54,975,

;and also that the combined bids of the next nearest highest bidders were $51,771.

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB
CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. AMES.

It is a difference of only G per cent. I have the official figures here.

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB
CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. AMES.

Mr. Burrows and the companies with which he is connected have been so remarkably successful, their success has differed so greatly from that of their competitors that it has excited a good deal of comment outside this House and has occasioned I may say to the right hon. Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier), a good deal of distrust of the Department of the Interior throughout the Canadian Northwest. We undertook a partial investigation, an investigation very limited-it could not be otherwise under the reference-and so we find ourselves with but little of the information we would like to have about the transactions with which this company is connected. In the Public Accounts Committee, however, the original documents were all produced, and we examined several witnesses. We examined Mr. Campbell and Mr. Finnie. When we asked Mr. Finnie- who did the banking for Mr. Burrows and supplied the cheques for him with most of the tenders

when we asked Mr. Finnie in one specific case the order of entry of the cheques and whether they had been accepted upon a certain day the committee stopped us and we could proceed no further. So, we reached the point where it was necessary for us to review the evidence and report to this House ; and that is what I propose to do this afternoon.

Now, in all this inquiry, Mr. T. A. Burrows was the central figure, and his remarkable success is one of the features of the investigation. As I have said, on September 1, 1901, Mr. Burrows had limits 571a and 814, an aggregate area of 44 square miles. Between that date and June, 1905, he had added to his holdings about 500 square miles. He tendered in various names, but always with the same success. Twenty times during these four years he tendered, in nineteen cases with success and only once in that time did he fail. Compare the experience of the next largest speculative holders, Messrs. H. and K. MacDonald. They are shrewd firm of timber operators. There were two brothers. Kenneth was the practical man who went to the West and explored the timber limits and learned just what to offer. Hector was the Ottawa man; he stayed here and handled the business. They tendered thirty times during the period when Mr. Burrows was so successful, fourteen times they succeeded and sixteen times they failed. Add up their bids, and you find that they paid three and a half times as much for their limits as was

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. AMES.

offered by the next highest bidders. Contrast their bids in these thirty times, and you will see that they vary greatly. Trace the bids of Mr. Burrows and the Imperial Pulp Company and see by what narrow margins they always win.

Now, L propose to lay before this House a number of specific instances which have come out in connection with the Public Accounts Committee and have come to our knowledge by the study of the original documents that have been presented from time to time. This will enable us to ascertain something of the unique methods by which such success has been acquired by the brother-in-law of the late Minister of the Interior. The first limit is berth 1046. This lies on the Pembina river, 40 miles northeast of Edmonton. It is a selection berth and very valuable, or will be when the railway reaches Athabaska Landing. The bids were opened on May 7, 1903. They were four in number. The lowest was that of Crafts and Lee, of Edmonton, $815 ; next, James A. Powell, Edmonton, $1,510 ; then D. R. Fraser and Company, $3,015 ; and finally T. A. Burrows of Winnipeg, $3,500. If you examine the four original bids you will find that the tenders of Crafts and Lee, James A. Powell and D. R. Fraser and Company are all on the regular printed forms of the department. They were all filled out in perfectly proper manner, and in each case there was one accepted cheque and one only. There is other evidence that these three bids were perfectly regular. But when you examine the original Burrows tender, what do you find ? He encloses two cheques on the Bank of Ottawa here, one for $3,000 and one for $500. These figures are somewhat significant when we consider the other tenders. Here was the next highest, that of D. R. Fraser and Company, $3,015. If only the Burrows $3,000 cheque had gone in, or he would have lost the limit, but the second cheque carried him over and he won the berth. Now, I ask you, Mr. Speaker, if there is not something strange and suggestive in these facts.

Again, take limit 1047, probably the most valuable limit of its size in the whole Canadian Northwest, traversed from end to end by the Canadian Northern Railway, lying right along the railroad and on both sides of it, a selection area of 50 square miles out of seven townships on the north slope of the Porcupine Hills. Last summer, an adjacent limit, 964, which contains only 32 square miles, selected from a smaller area, was sold by Shaw brothers to the Ruby Lake Lumber Company for $100,000 in cash. I have the documents to prove that fact. If this latter limit was worth $100,000, then limit 1047 was worth double the amount. Limit 1047 was applied for by Mr. Burrows, or rather by the Burrows interest-Mr. Burrows' stenographer in this case-and bids were opened on May 7, 1903. In this case there were five ten-

ders : Pritchard and Stone, $2,000 ; J. S.

Hough, for client, $1,050 ; Mutchenbaoker brothers, $5,510 ; H. and K. McDonald et al of Ottawa, $13,524, and T. A. Burrows, $15,000. And, when we came to examine the originals, we found-what we never could have learned from any copies-we learned, from the marginal notes, that Mr. Burrows' bid of $15,000 was made up of three cheques, $6,000, $5,000 and $4,000.

Until the McDonald bid arrived, Mr. Burrow's $6,000 cheque was quite enough to capture the limit. But after the McDonald tender came in for $13,524, it required the combined three cheques of $6,000, $5,000 and $4,000 to clear the barrier and capture the limit. Now, I ask : Is that coincidence or is it design ? When we came to study before the Public Accounts Committee the history of 1046 and 1047, we found that bids for both berths were opened on the same day, the 7th of May, 1903, and we learned that upon that day Mr. Burrows had out at least five cheques for $6,000, $5,000, $4,000, $3,000 and $500. Now we examined Mr. Finnie, and we said to Mr. Finnie, these cheques were on your bank, did you accept these cheques on that day, and if you did, in what order did you accept them ? Now I leave it to you, Mr. Speaker, and to the right hon. the leader of the government, if that was not a fair question to ask. Here was Mr. Bristol's question :

Q. On March 7, 1903, there appears from the record to have been five cheques of T. A. Burrows, one for $3,000 and one for $500 put in in respect of timber berth No. 1046, forming part of the tender, and in the other case of three cheques for $6,000, $5,000 and $4,000 re-specively, put in in respect of timber berth No. 1047, and the record also shows that they are on the bank of Ottawa with whom you say Mr. Burrows had an account. I want you to tell me whether those cheques were charged up to Mr. Burrows' account on that day?

Mr. Macdonald objected to the question, and asked for the ruling of the chairman. The chairman ruled against the question, and on appeal being taken, it was voted down by the usual partisan majority. That is why the inquiry came to a close. That was a crucial question. We had to know the order in which those cheques were accepted in order to ascertain whether they were really there before 12 o'clock on the day when the tenders came in.

Now take up berth 1099, another berth of value.

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB

Theodore Arthur Burrows

Liberal

Mr. BURROWS.

Will the hon. gentleman allow me to ask him a question ? Is it not a fact that in the committee I said that if you would put me in the box I would tell you where the cheques were, and you would not do so, you would not give me an opportunity of telling you anything about the cheques ?

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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CON

Herbert Brown Ames

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. AMES.

The hon. member was too busy drumming up Liberal members out in

the corridors. He was quite at liberty to be called by his friends, if they had desired.

Now berth 1099 consisted of forty-four square miles on Brule lake, west of Edmonton, and close to the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific. Bids were opened on the 11th November, 1903. There were three offers, J. W. Blain, of Strathcona, $3,300 ; Kidd and Thompson, of Ottawa, $5,116, and T. A. Burrows, $6,500. Mr. Blain's and Thompson's tenders were on the regular printed form of the department, and there was one accepted cheque in each and no more. They were both perfectly regular tenders. The higher of them came in just before 12 o'clock. When we came to examine Mr. Burrows' original tender we found it was on plain paper, but in a departmental envelope, with crest and probably written in the department. We found it contained two cheques, one for $3,500 and the other for $3,000. There again you have the same coincidence. It is strange that Mr. Burrows' second cheque for $3,500 was just $200 above Mr. Blain's tender, and when at the last moment a tender comes from Kidd and Thompson, for $5,110, a second cheque of $3,000 makes it possible for Mr. Burrows to still capture the limit. Now again I ask : Is that coincidence or is it design ?

Take another berth, 1192, fifty square miles on the Pembina river, near the Grand Trunk Pacific. Bids were opened on December 7, 1904. There were three tenders, Hector and Kenneth McDonald for $5,551, John Walter, for $5,065, and T. A. Burrows for $5,500. There again there were two cheques of Mr. Burrows, one for $3,000 and one for $2,500, and the two cheques together were just a little above the John Walter tender. Once again: Is that coincidence or is it

design ? If there were only one or two cases like these, we might say it was coincidence, but when we find case after case where the tender differs from the regular method, and where the results are always the same, and success always comes to the same individual, I leave it to you, Mr. Speaker, to say whether these circumstances do not call for some explanation.

Now something was said in this House some time ago about timber berth 1108. I will not refer to that at great length. Timber berth 1108 consisted of sixty square miles on Moose lake, north of Lake Winnipegosis. It was transferred to the Imperial Pulp Company. When the originals came down in connection with that timber berth, what did we find ? We found that Mr. A. W. Fraser, of Ottawa, had written with his own hand an offer of $1,000, that Mr. James Currie, of Cumberland, bidding for another party, had put in an offer of $6,420, and that Mr. Fraser had written a second offer, signing W. H. Nolan's name to it, not

his own, and that second offer, was for $7,000. We asked Mr. Fraser, and he admitted that he had written both his own tender for $1,000 and Nolan's tender for $7,000 ; but he said that he wrote the $7,000 tender in Mr. Nolan's name on instructions from Mr. Burrows, that he put it in envelope which he gave to Mr. Burrows, and that Mr. Burrows must have added the $7,000 cheque. That was Mr. Fraser's testimony. At all events I may say that Mr. Currie firmly believes that he was euchred out of that berth. He believes that the other tender was either bogus or that it came in too late ; and I would certainly say that the circumstances are such as to lend strength to such a belief. Now I will digress for a moment and deal with Mr. Fraser, because Mr. Fraser carried on several transactions, I do not know for whom ; but inasmuch as he often acted for the Burrows syndicate, in all probability he is connected with these deals. There is a large and strong company known as the Red Deer Lumber Company. It is financed by American capital, and it controls a considerable area on the Red Deer river, and sells great quantities of cut lumber. The Red Deer Lumber Company, in the early days, found it apparently necessary to procure their limits through middlemen. Latterly they have been acting directly apparently with much better satisfaction. Among their earlier acquisitions was timber berth 988. That was put up on the 16th of December, 1901. There were two bidders, A. C. Fraser, of Brandon, for $3,500, and A. W. Fraser, of Ottawa, for $3,769. A. C. Fraser's bid arrived by mail the day before the tenders were opened. The other offer arrived on the morning of the last day. When the bids were opened it was found that A. W. Fraser's bid was accompanied by a letter which says : ' I inclose an accepted cheque.' Yet there were two cheques in it. Mr. Fraser acquired the limit, and sold it to the Red Deer Lumber Company for a very valuable consideration. It would be of interest to this House to know who were the parties with whom he divided. Again, there was berth No. 1051 which went in the same way ; bids were opened on the 6th March, 1903. They were as follows :

Henry Christopherson, Yorkton.. .. $2,800 Mutchenbacker Brothers, Rosseau.. 3,510

John Hanbury, Brandon 1,650

J. S. Hough, Winnipeg 6,509

John McBain, Ottawa 7,000

Now we find on examining them that Mutchenbacker's tender, Hanbury's tender and Hough's tender were all on the printed form of the department and were put in the regular way, but we find, when we come to the original John McBain tender, that it was written in A. W. Fraser's own handwriting. Thus Fraser has a second alias. He was first writing out tenders in the name Ur. AMES.

of W. H. Nolan and now he is using the name of John McBain. In the McBain offer we find no amount stated, but there were three cheques which the marginal notes show came from Mr. Fraser, one for $3,000, another for $2,000 and a third for $2,000. It will be seen that the $3,000 and combined $2,000 would have been enough to have captured the limit against the first three competitors, but when J. F. Hough's bid arrived it was necessary to put in an additional cheque for $2,000 so as to make up the $7,000. This limit was also sold to the Red Deer Lumber Company for a good figure.

Look now at berth No. 1239. Berth No. 1239 acquired by the Red Deer Lumber Company shortly afterwards, without the intervention of the middleman, Mr. A. W. Fraser. It was acquired direct and the company paid for it $25,150 ; in other words, they paid the government instead of paying A. W. Fraser.

Now, I propose to discuss for a few minutes what is known as the Prince Albert deal. This story discloses a betrayal of trust for the benefit of the same parties which is 'without parallel in the history of the Department of the Interior. It is the story of the Big River Lumber Company and its twin aggregation the McBain-Munson combination. We will extricate the limits as we go on. On the 17th of January, 1903, Urquhart, Richard and Pattison, real estate agents of St. Paul and Winnipeg, writing, as they said, 'on behalf of a syndicate of Urquhart, Richards and Pattison. real estate American financial men,' asked that 50 blocks of timber, each ten miles in extent, at the head waters of the Churchill river to the northwest of Prince Albert, should be put up at one time to competition. The southeast corner of the area of selection came within 25 miles of Prince Albert and these people asked that they might have an opportunity of selecting this timber throughout an area 100 miles long by 70 miles wide. It was an unprecedented demand. There is no such demand as that in the history of the whole department; 500 square miles to be selected out of an area of 7,020 square miles. Both the area of selection and the other features in connection with it were most unusual. It is almost impossible to understand at first sight how the department should have been persuaded to put such a proposition up. Think of the magnitude of it ! This means a strip of continuous woodland four miles wide all the way from Montreal to Ottawa. It meant a monopoly of the timber resources of Prince Albert for practically all time. There was a large number of people at Prince Albert dependent on the timber trade. It meant a monopoly which would shut them out to the last man and yet this enormous transaction, the largest on record, is characterized by practically the shortest

delay of almost any of these transactions. The delays allowed are in inverse ratio to the magnitude of the proposition. Of advertisements there was one in the Manitoba ' Free Press ' and one in the Prince Albert * Advocate.' The time allowed from the time that the advertisement left Ottawa till the bids got back to Ottawa, was from the 28th January to the 7th March, thirty-eight days from Ottawa to Ottawa. That meant four weeks for the people of Prince Albert to ascertain where that timber lay and to decide what they would pay for 500 square miles of timber spread out over 7,000 square miles. Protests galore came pouring into the department. The ex-Minister of the Interior told us the other day that only one protest had ever come to his notice, but let him look through the file in the department and lie will find that there were protests in this instance from the mayor, from the board of trade and from everybody in Prince Albert who had any interest in the country. That made no difference. To all the protests the Commissioner of Dominion Lands made this curt reply :

As these berths were put up and advertised in the ordinary manner it was not thought advisable to make any change.

The tenders were opened on the 7th March, 1903 ; there was no competition. Not one of the Prince Albert people who had been objecting made any attempt to bid, and when the department and its friends learned that there was only one outside bidder, namely, Mutchenbaeker Bros., they realized tiiat they had the whole situation in their own hands and so they bid $5,000 for the first choice and they put in another bid of $1,000 for the second choice. A. W. Fraser, at one time president of the Ottawa Liberal Club, using the name of William Crown, of Prince Albert, but acting under the instructions of T. A .Burrows, put in a bid in the name of the Big River Lumber Company for the first choice at $5,000. and again, this time using John McBain's name, he put in a tender for the second choice, and we find that in the envelopes there were unidentifiable manager's cheques on the bank of Ottawa which were given in exchange for cheques of Mr. Burrows. So that Mr. Burrows in this way acquired berths Nos. 1048 and 1049, comprising 500 square miles with the right of selection out of 7,000 square miles for the sum of $6,000, or $12 per square mile, or two cents per acre.

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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LIB

Theodore Arthur Burrows

Liberal

Mr. BURROWS.

Does the hon. gentleman say that I acquired berth No. 1049 ?

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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CON
LIB

Theodore Arthur Burrows

Liberal

Mr. BURROWS.

I say you are telling an absolute falsehood and you know it.

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Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS

Order.

Topic:   SUPPLY-SASKATCHEWAN VALLEY
Subtopic:   J. G. TURRIFF.
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May 19, 1908