June 7, 1905

CON

Alfred Thompson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMPSON.

He has the casting vote only, which is, of course, very rarely exercised. By that method of government you see that this the Dominion government always holds the power in the hollow of its baud', because it controls the five nominative members and the commissioner against the five elected members, so that should a division ever happen, as it did on oue memorable occasion, yvlien the five elected would be pitted against the five appointed, the decision would rest with the commissioner. You see, therefore, that that is not really a representative body. It is controlled from Ottawa, and the time has come when we may, without any fear, I believe, ask the Dominion government to give us greater power. The personnel of this council is composed of Mr. Sinclair, the Gold Commissioner, who is the head of our gold court and lias the standing somewhat of a lesser judge ; Major Wood, who is Commissioner of the Northwest Mounted Police, and is like the general of an army with Ills staff under him"; Mr. Girouard, who is registrar of titles ; Mr. Litligow, who is comptroller' of

finance, analogous to our Finance Minister ; and there is Judge Dugas, who is the senior judge of our territorial court, and whose position is analogous to that of the chief justice in a province. I know all these gentlemen personally very well, and I know them to be all estimable gentlemen. They are Canadians down to the ground and good citizens, and in the main have done goon work. But every one of these derives his sustenance directly from our federal government and, being human, must necessarily be biased at times and biased against the interests of the people. In saying that I am not uttering one word against these men personally, individually or officially, but I am simply pointing out that in the very nature of things they cannot be relied upon to advise always in the best interests of our people. What I ask is that we should give the people of the Yukon the right to elect the ten members of their council and let the commissioner preside as at present. In case the government should see lit to graut this reasonable request, I think they will not have) reason to regret their course. These people are not novices iu the art of self-government. Every man in that country went In there as an adept in that respect. Like myself and like you, Mr. Speaker, every man there has been accustomed from his boyhood to cast his vote for the representative he desired' in the legislative halls of his province, so) that you are not risking any experiment iu giving the people of the Yukon these rights. I have sat in that council, and I know that) the people there are quite well fitted to) select men to represent them in their little' local parliament, just as are the people in' the other provinces to elect their local* representatives.

They are the same race, they are of the same blood, they speak the same language, as the people of Quebec, Ontario, and the other provinces of Canada. I am not asking anything new, but simply that the same right that Canadians have Claimed, the right that our forefathers in Canada fought for. shall be conferred upon their sons who reside in the Yukon. You can see whatj the effect would be. Or, if the government will not grant full elective power, then the alternative would be-and it is only an alternative and can only be adhered to for a short time-to nominate men completely outside the ranks of those who derive their support in any way from the Dominion government. We want the whole number of them elected ; but if the government will not concede that, then we are prepared-I think I may say we are prepared-to accept for a time the nomination of men who are outside the government employ altogether.

At six o'clock, House took recess.

After Recess.

House resumed at eight o'clock.

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CON

CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READING.


Bill (No. 150) respecting the Interprovin-j cial and James Bay Railway Company.- Mr. Devlin.


SUPPLY-THE YUKON TERRITORY.


House resumed motion for Committee of Supply.


CON

Alfred Thompson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMPSON.

Mr. Speaker, when you left the chair at six o'clock I was discussing the Yukon council, our local legis-i lative body in the Yukon Territory, and showing how necessary it was that we, should have a body fully representative of the people to prepare our ordinances, which have the ett'ect of laws. During my argument I referred to Judge Britton's report on the Treadgold concessions. I was interested when reading that report to notice that Judge Britton had found in the Yukon so many new words that he was unacquainted with, that he made a little glossary of them at the end of his report. I mention this in passing to show the House how. difficult it is to convey to the minds of lion, gentlemen here things that may be urgently needed in the Yukon. The very terms we use there in discussing some of our commonplace events, are strange to, men like Judge Britton and lion, gentlemen in this House. It is not necessary for me to enumerate them. The question of a; fully elective council for the Yukon is not a new one there, nor is it one that any) particular party has a monopoly of. Every) platform that has been framed in the last four years has contained this plank. Again, I refer the House to the platform of the1 Hon. James Hamilton Ross, and with your permission I will read one of the planks : '

That the convention (that is the convention which nominated Mr. Ross) views with satisfaction the increase of the number of elective members of the Yukon council-

I should say in explanation of that that the Yukon council at first was composed only of two members elected ,by the peoi pie, and that the government two years) ago extended the number to five. He went on to say : ,

-and urgently recommend that the membership of the council be made wholly elective without delay ; and further, that all matters of a purely local character be committed to the council for deliberation and determination.

That is one of the planks in the platform! upon which Mr. Ross appealed successfully to the people of that territory for their, suffrages; and I have no doubt that, al-thought he is now in the upper chamber, he) is of the same opinion to-day. Now, Mr.l Speaker, in closing this particular phase of! the question, I only have to add that thd Yukon Territory to-day is the only terri-j tory organized in Canada that is without

a fully representative government. I do not include the Territories of Ungava and Mackenzie, as I do not think they have any organized governmtnt at this time.. The other Territories have been married off, so to speak, and there is only the Yukon Territory left. I hope that the government, after considering this matter will see fit to grant the Yukon Territory that measure of self-government which I have

advocated. .

A few days ago the right lion, the Prime Minister suggested that in the disposition of these Territories remaining after the erection of the two new provinces, they might profitably be allotted to the various provinces that now have representative and responsible government. A few days after that I took occasion to rise in my place in this House and, in the name of the people of the Yukon, entered a protest against its being disposed of in that manner. I did not go into the question extensively then, but with your permission I will do so briefly now. In view of the fact that we have produced so much wealth, that we are producing so much wealth, that we have a population there that is more or less permanent, we feel that we lia\e a future of which the past is only an earnest, and that we we are fit for responsible government. I think it would be an igno-; minious end of our territorial career to tag us on to the upper end of British Columbia. Neither do I think it would be well from the standpoint of British Columbia, as being the best province, in fact the only one, geographically speaking, to which we could be attached. ' British Columbia at this moment has ail the territory that she can manage, in fact, with all due deference to my hon. friend opposite from that province (Mr Galliher), she has a little more than she'can conveniently manage. The credit of the province of British Columbia is none too good, the government of British Columbia is none too safe, nor has it been as stable as it should be during the past decade And. Sir. that fact I have just mentioned. the instability of the government of British Columbia, has done more than anythin"- else to check cnnital coming into that province from abroad, as it would have done immediately after the breaking out of the Boer war. I know for a positive fact that the money markets of the world, at the breaking out of the Boer war. turned to the American continent for safe investment: I know that British (capitalists turned their eyes towards British Columbia; and T also know that, because of tlm labour troubles that existed in that province: then, these English capitalists did not invest their money there as they otherwise would have done. Now. Mr. Speaker, we in the Yukon have troubles enough of our own without desiring to graft upon them those of British Columbia.

I said that I had faith in the future of that country and when X say that X am simply reflecting the prophecy of Dr. Dawson m 1887 that he had not the faintest doubt that the Yukon Territory would still be part ot Canada's great reserve. I wish very briefly to point out to the House the evidence 1 have regarding the future of this territory which I have the honour to represent, and m doing so I shall quote first from the Statistical Year-Book of Canada for the year 1904, and show the House what this territory has done in the way of producing wealth as compared with the other provinces of Canada since 1802. I have here the Statistical YearBook of Canada prepared by our own Mr. Johnston whose name is sufficient as he is very well and creditably known. This book shows the quantities of gold produced by the different provinces. For instance Ontario has produced $2,124,429 in gold ; Saskatchewan has produced $293,946 ; Quebec lias produced $295,053 ; British Columbia, a province that has been mining-well, I have its production here since 1862 and I believe it was mining earlier than that-has produced in that time $90,271,226. Nova Scotia has also been producing gold since 1862 and the inhabitants of that province think they have produced a good deal of gold. I shall show you by comparison that they have produced very little. Their product is $16,728,319.

I have given you the figures for these provinces and territories. What has the Yukon done in this time? Up, to last year-that is not including the present spring's clean up 'which I expect will be in the vicinity of $10,060,000 -up to the end of 1904, we have produced $118,000,000 in gold. How does that compare with the total output ? The total output of gold in Canada since 1862 lias been $-11,000,000 in round numbers. Over half the gold produced in the whole of Canada since 18 )2 has been produced by the Yukon and the greater portion of that has been produced since 1896. In nine short years aye. in eight short years, we have produced over half as much gold as the whole of the Dominion m-cluding what the province of British Columbia lias produced since 1862. Is that not a record that any province, let alone any territory, might be proud of ? To show the House the extent of the gravels that we have in that territory I shall quote a letter from Dr. Robert Bell, director of the Geological Survey, whom I asked to measure for me if possible the auriferous deposits according to the map prepared by, Mr. McConnell who mapped that country; His letter is dated May 30. 1905, and is as follows :

Dear Sir - i have had Mr. Seward, our geographer fin consultation with Mr. McConnell, who has returned from Europe), make as careful an estimate as possible of the acreage of the gold-bearing gravels of the Klondike. Mr. McConnell divides them into the river gravels and the white channel gravels. On the autho-

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ROBERT BELL.


The total length of the auriferous portions ot the creeks of the Klondike district is about llo miles, that is in the well-defined portions alone, to say nothing of the Kluane district, in the southern part where creeks known to carry gold extend over twenty-five miles. No man, .even if he had the eye ot a prophet, could foretell the future of that territory. In an earlier portion of my address I stated that in an inhospitable region in Russia, the Vologda district is to-day sustaining a population of over a million souls. t\ lien one realizes what tiiat means the imagination fails to grasp what the Yukon may be doing twenty-five or fiftv years from now. Mr. Joseph StcGillivrav, a hydraulic mining engineer of extensive'experience both in California and in tiie Yukon subnutted for the consideration of the Board ot Trade of Dawson, in 1004. a letter a portion of which I shall read. I am now trying to show the House that this countrv is'not a country of a day, that this gold is not going to peter out, so to speak, in a few months or years; I wish to impress on the House that m tiie Yukon we have a countrv that is not a country of to-day, but that with a little help at the present juncture it will be a country of a century and perhaps even more than that. Mr. McGillivray says The following is an estimate of the amount of gravel on these white channel benches alone which measure about 27 miles in length with an SVh, :'250 feet " Wi:lth 100 'feet " !hls ls a very conservative estimate of the depth, as these same benches on Bonanza Klondike and Hunker are much deeper than that, especially where they near the Klondike, l here a depth of 100 feet is attained. Taking this conservative average the estimate is * 27 miles 142,560 running feet. 1,250 feet wide' wl feet deep, 17,820,000,000 cubic feet The7f7= cu'bfc'yards0 CUWC b3' 27 W°Uld sive 660,000,000 waTsh .^amount oV grav^- ' in WWch f° grirvfd 777th? ,7me' not tLe amount of giatei, that I wish to impress on the House. waterlt(e„e„^Tlme^t,hat 5'000 miners' inches of I (equalling 7,o00 cubic feet tier minute) fafinnFQ°<S t0 w^ite channel by gravitation at a sufficient elevation to give a hvdraucienPcve oTwater 10°7et °r " ™ ' efflers° inch to everv '-Wal^ng should be one miners inch to every , cubic yards of gravel every Mr. THOMPSON " "4 hours. Each inch is equal to 11 cubic feet per minute. That is to say, 5,000 miners' inches or water washing 7 cubic yards to the inch ever} „4 hours would equal 35,000 cubic vards every 24 hours. tlle summer mining season here is short, days is a liberal estimate of the lime in wmich to carry on such work. Thus 35,000 yards per day for 130 days would equal 4,550,000 yards each sep.son. The time it would take to wash out these benches alone with 5,000 inches of water each season of 130 days, would therefore be 660.000,-)00 yards at 4,550,000 a year, 145 years and 70 1-7 days. That is the estimate of the time it would take to wash out gravel benches near Dawson with 5,000 inches of water, something that we have not now and will not have for some time to come. One more quotation trom Mr. McGillivray : I feel confident there is enough of pay gravel t0 ,asVfor tIle next hundred years at the rate it could be worked with the water system I have already described. When I say that the system could be put in for $3,000,000, I am stating an outside figure and one which would cover all the expense of installing the electric power plants. This might not be deemed advisable at the beginning of the enterprise ; the initial cost for simply bringing on the water to work ^grounds might possibly come under $2,- He was discussing the water svstem then He proceeds : h,lf„'.his government water supply system should be put m l see no reason why our annual output ol gold should not be increased to $50,000,000 annually, and kept at that amount for many 7,7s' an<J-what sueh a building up of this disilneatl t0 the rest of the Yukon and 77 wealth and prosperity of the whole Dom-mion, I need not point out. I will not weary the House with any further reference to the extent of the gravels we have there. I just want to show the House now why Canada should help us in developing this vast territorv. We are all your own people and we are doing our best m the Yukon to build up Canada and to perpetuate the Canadian interests. We of us who are Canadians have upheld Canadian civilization, encouraged Canadian ideas and vof, 7 £anadian trade- Let me inform you, Sir. Speaker, that we are not all Canadians m the Y'ukon Territory. A very large portion of our population conies front other countries ouiside our own. Canada has no better customer in the world per head today than the Yukon. I will show you how, ns I said before, we produce absolutely nothing but the gold. We have no manu-lactures ; we have no agricultural products. M e have to import everything and the people there live well. Every mail, woman and cWid who comes over the White Pass into the Yukon has to be clothed and fed and every man woman and child should he clothed and fed by our own Canadian manufacturers and producers. Is there any coun- try in the world that Canada clothes and feeds ? To-day our people are scouring the world for new markets, establishing consular agencies, of which I quite approve and I only hope there may be more of them when right here at our own doors, within our own Dominion, we have a market, which, if encouraged will prove of greater benefit to Canada than any market in Brazil, the Indies or in the old country. To show you that I am not saying anything that is not an absolute fact I will read an extract from a statement prepared for me by Mr. Bain, of the Customs Department here, and by this extract I hope to show the House what the Yukon has bought from Canada within the last few years. I hold in my hand a 'statement of Canadian and foreign goods entering northern British Columbia and Yukon Territory, via the White Pass and Yukon route, during the fiscal year 1903-4.' I will not weary the House by reading over the different months, but I will give the total which will convey to the minds of hon. members what I wish to convey and that is that in 1903-4 the Yukon Territory bought from Canada $4,034,385 worth of goods. Remember this is not a bartering trade, but it is a trade for which we pay absolutely every dollar in cash and every dollar in gold at that. With other countries you have a bartering trade. It is not so with us ; you send your goods there and get tiie money. Is that not a market worth cultivating ? Here you have a territory right within our own Dominion-which will buy from you over $4,000,000 worth of goods per year and it does not cost yon a cent to establish a consular agency there. The people within the bounds of that Territory are only too glad to come here, to Montreal, to Toronto or to the great manufacturing and farming centres of Canada and buy their food and clothing. Every pair of shoes, every suit of clothes, every shirt, every hat, every overcoat, absolutely everything that we use to clothe our bodies and to feed them has to be imported into the Yuk-on. Nor does it stop there. Absolutely everything we use to work our mines we have to. import from the outside. In the early years of that Territory Canada did not get as much of the trade as she gets to-day, but due to the fact that the Customs Department have there a competent and efficient officer in the person of Mr. Busby, Canada and the Canadian manufacturers have, within the last turn or three years, received a very much greater percentage of that trade than they did in former years. In 1898 the Canadian people only received 7 per cent of the Yukon trade. Now, in the Yukon we buy SO cents in every dollars worth that we import into that country from Canada-eighty .per cent now as against seven per cent then, due very largely to the fact that we have there men -who are alive to the trade of Canada .and to .the fostering of that trade. We have to-day in Dawson 24 bonded customs warehouses and 5 inland revenue warehouses. Just one quotation more to show you what we have bought from Canada. There are no returns available previous to 1898 although we were .doing business there for two years before that time, but since 1S98 we have bought $13,976,000 worth and we have paid to the Canadian government in duties $3,412,980. These figures are from the Customs Department, they are absolutely correct and they speak for themselves. That is all I have to say upon the trade of Canada and the Yukon ex-cept to impress upon the House and the country that right here in our own Dominion we have a market that can be and should be supplied by our own people. Now I have finished.


CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

Before my hon. friend sits down may I ask him if that $13,000,000 represents entirely imported goods ?

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CON

Alfred Thompson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMPSON.

This is a ' statement showing the value of exports from and goods entered for consumption in the Yukon Territory during the undermentioned fiscal years.' Does that answer my friend's question ? [DOT]

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CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

Y'es, that would he imported goods.

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CON

Alfred Thompson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMPSON.

Altogether, except that some of them may have been imported from the provinces of Canada. As to that, however, I am not quite sure. Since 189S we have bought very nearly $14,000,000 worth of goods. I say, that I have finished. If I have succeeded in laying before this House and this country the wants of the people of the Yukon I am content. 1 have come over

4.000 miles to Ottawa to lay before the Canadian parliament the cause of the miners in the Yukon. To me that country has a fascination that is felt by nearly every one who has lived there. But, it has more. It has a future in which I have every hope, and it is populated by a people in whom I have every confidence. They have braved everything in following the fic-kle wand of fortune. The work they have done in developing that country in the past eight years is simply marvellous ; but it is only an earnest of what they will do if they get some assistance from this government. On behalf of our Yukon population, I appeal to you, not as a party man appealing to party prejudices, but as a Canadian appealing to Canadians for help at the present juncture for the great Yukon.

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CON

Joseph Gédéon Horace Bergeron

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BERGERON.

Mr. Speaker, before my hon. friend sits down I want to ask him one or two questions. During his remarks this afternoon he said thaU$28.000,-OuO worth of gold had been taken out of the Yukon. I want to ask him how much the Yukon has paid to Canada since 1S96 as royalty upon that gold, and how much the Yukon has cost the country altogether 1

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CON

Alfred Thompson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMPSON.

I regret that I cannot answer the question of my hon. friend regarding the amount of royalty and export tax which we have paid ; but, speaking without the book and from memory, I would say that up to the end of June a year ago we very nearly paid our way, except for the two charges mentioned-$750,-

000 for the Yukon field force and $400,000 for the Mackenzie & Mann settlement. We bought nearly $14,000,000 of goods and paid nearly $3,500,000 in duty.

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LIB

Robert George Macpherson

Liberal

Mr. R. G. MACPHERSON (Vancouver City).

Mr. Speaker, I have enjoyed very much the speech of the hon. member for the Yukon here to-day. It has been a source of a good deal of enlightenment to all of us. Many of the things he has said I heartily coincide with, because I know a good deal about the Yukon country ; for, though

1 have never been there, the province of British Columbia is contiguous to it. But the hon. member said one or two things which, as a representative of British Columbia, I can hardly let pass. If the hon. gentleman knew the people of British Columbia better than he does, he would not consider it a bad province to tie to. I am not prepared to say whether it would be a good thing for the Yukon Territory to be joined to the province of British Columbia ; but the Yukon country produces gold alone, while British Columbia is the next largest gold producer of the Dominion, and has solved to a great extent many of the problems presented to any new gold-producing country. The hon. member has made a comparison between the Yukon Territory and the other parts of Canada in regard to the production of gold. Figures can almost prove anything. We have not complete returns of all the gold that has been produced in British Columbia from the first finding of gold in the Fraser river in 1858 ; because British Columbia did not then belong to the Dom-i inion of Canada, but was a crown colony, and there was not a very accurate record kept of the gold production, so that statisticians can only guess what was taken out. But if we are to believe many of the men who worked in the Cariboo and Cassiar districts in the early days, millions of dollars which were never kept track of were taken to the United States. I fancy that the same thing would apply to the Yukon. There is no doubt that the province of British Columbia has been a very large gold producer. In the comparison which my hon. friend made, he said that the province of British Columbia produced some $90,000,-OoO of gold while the Yukon produced in its short history $120,000,000. But I would like to call your attention to the fact that the province of British Columbia is the great mining region of the Dominion of Canada. Last year, that is, in the year 1903-4. that province produced gold-and it was almost all placer gold-to the value of $5,373,000, silver to the value of $1,521,472,

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CON

Joseph Gédéon Horace Bergeron

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BERGERON.

copper to the value of $4,547,000, lead to the value of $639,000, iron to the value of $6,870, coal to the value of $3,504,000 and coke to the value of $327,000, making in all a mineral production of $16,970,000. In the same year the whole of the rest of Canada produced in gold, silver, copper, lead, iron, nickel, coal and coke, $22,000,000. and the Yukon Territory produced $12,200,000. In the year 1902-3 the province of British Columbia produced $17,000,000 odd, the rest of Canada, $20,000,000 odd, and the Yukon $14,000,000 odd. I have not at hand the figures for last year, but I recollect reading in the report of the Minister of Mines that the province of British Columbia produced, nearly $20,000,000, of which $6,000,000 was placer gold. I just mention these facts to show that the province of British Columbia, which my hon. friend has not a very good word for, has added pretty largely to the mineral wealth of this grand Dominion of ours. I am not here to say anything derogatory of the Yukon country. It is a grand country, producing a great deal of gold, and has been the means of opening up great riches to many men in the Dominion of Canada-not to as many as we would like ; because Canadians were not the first to go to that country ; the Canadian is not a miner. Outside of British Columbia and the Yukon Territory, there is very little gold mining in the Dominion. The more gold the Yukon Territory produces, the more riches there is for Canada; and the greater the mineral production of the province of British Columbia, the greater is the mineral wealth of Canada.

I agree with my hon. friend, that for many years the Yukon will produce a great deal of gold, and the same may be said of British Columbia ; and I am of his opinion that it would be infinitely better for the Yukon country-I do not know whether it would be good for the province of British Columbia or not, but I think it would-to be joined to British Columbia and become part and parcel of that province. Out in the Yukon you have a fairly large population as compared with Britisn Columbia, and in the latter province we have also a fairly large population, but spread over a considerable extent of territory, and consequently not as compact as the populations in the other provinces. We have also the same resources as the Yukon, the same class of people, we require the same laws ; and if these two were joined together they would be a greater factor in the Dominion than if separate, and no doubt the production of mineral wealth would be greater. The very trouble which the hon. gentleman lias pointed out as impeding the progress of the Yukon, namely, the timidity of capitalists to imvest their money there on account of its unsettled laws and mining regulations, would be wiped out entirely, because in British Columbia wre have, if not the best mining laws in the world, very

good mining laws. We have been mining there fifty years and have solved many of the problems that are still awaiting solution in the Yukon. By the union of the Y'ukon with our province many of the difficulties there would disappear. With regard to the suggestion of my hon. friend, that British Columbia has not been very prosperous the last few years owing to the unsettled condition of its labour market, I might reply that in my opinion we have not had a very disastrous time in our province. True, we went through some trouble a few years ago, but it was not the unsettled condition of the labour market, nor was it strikes or other labour disturbances which were the main causes. What gave that province the worst black eye it ever had, as far as mining is concerned, was not the unsettled condition of the labour market, nor the paying of too high wages-because you cannot pay miners too high wages in my opinion-tout the greed of speculators in eastern Canada, who bought up pi'ospects and mines and capitalized them for extravagant amounts, and then sold tiiese stocks to the general public, although they knew very well it was impossible to pay dividends on the capital floated. That has been the curse of our province, but that has gone by the board to a great extent, and the people out there are once more getting on their feet. Last year we produced nearly three million dollars more than we did the year before. That increased production was due to the fact that stable people were taking hold of our mines and working them for the minerals they contained, and were not depending for their profit on the sale of stocks and the gullibility of the public. We in British Columbia have the warmest feelings for the Yukon. Possibly 'per capita' more money went out from British Columbia to develop the Yukon than from any other part of this continent. We all have faith in that country, the majority of our people know what mining is, they have done their share towards the building up of the Yukon Territory, and the more that Territory' prospers the better for our province, and the coast cities in particular. For those reasons, 1 should be glad to see the Y'ukon Territory and the province of British Columbia joined together as one province.

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LIB

William Alfred Galliher

Liberal

Mr. W. A. GALLIHER (Kootenay).

Representing, as I do, a mining district, I can appreciate to the full what my hon. friend from the Yukon has stated to this House. There are but one or two points in his discourse on which I propose to touch at present. His reference to mining machinery deserves the consideration of this House. My hon. friend said that, not only for placer mining, but quartz mining also, the machinery made by Canadian manufacturers was not equal to the American implements. No doubt that is true, but it is easily explained. Mining in Canada, both quartz and placer, is practiaclly in its infancy, whereas in the United States mining has

been going on for a much longer time and on a much larger scale. In the United States the manufacturers, for many years past, have been making mining machinery and have had a large market for it in their own country and abroad. Consequently, they have familiarized themselves with a particular class of machinery suitable to the reduction of certain classes and grades of ore. For years they have been engaged in solving these problems and devising machinery to meet the requirement. In Canada, on the other hand, the manufacture of certain classes of mining machinery has only recently begun. True, for certain purposes, the Rand Drill Company make machinery equally as good as any made in the United States. *

But there are other processes for the reduction of ores, and other machines for, carrying out those processes manufactured, in the United States that are much better suited for the purpose than are our Cana-( dian-manufactured machines. I do not} say that in disparagement of our Canadian! manufacturers. They are doing very weli indeed for the experience they have had and the time during which they have been manufacturing this class of machinery. But the law providing for the free adrnis-' sion of mining machinery not manufactured) in Canada should be much more liberally! interpreted than it has been hitherto. At| the very least this should be the case until; time and experience have enabled the Can-) adian manufacturer to produce an articlei as good and as well suited for the purpose as that produced by the American manu-) facturer. There are certain supplies used in mining to which the same principle! would apply. For instance-though it may seem a simple thing-candles should he admitted free. In working in shaft or tuni nel the miner must use a candle. Now, we| have no mining candles manufactured in) Canada. Therefore, that is an article that should be on the free list. There are other articles that are in the same category ; and I think that when the commission sits-as I understand it will in the near future-to consider all tariff questions, I will be pres pared to furnish them with a list of those) articles that are not manufactured in Cans ada and that, though small in themselves when combined, represent a considerable) share of the cost of mining in any part ofl Canada. There is no reason why these ar-i tides should not be on the free list, be-i cause their free entry would not involve competition with any Canadian manufac-! turer. By the free admission of machinery) and supplies needed by miners and not manufactured in Canada you can help the) mining industry greatly. I believe that,) for a time, there was an exemption in the) case of mining dredges imported into the| Yukon. That exemption was for a year,) and, at the end of that period, it was ex-| tended for another year.

*071

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE YUKON TERRITORY.
Subtopic:   ROBERT BELL.
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CON

June 7, 1905