August 6, 1904

CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

What did the minister say the proposition is ?

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LIB

Clifford Sifton (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. SIFTON.

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LIB

Clifford Sifton (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. SIFTON.

There is authority given in this Order in Council to give Mr. Henderson a claim of 2.000 frontage and of the usual depth anywhere he can find ground not occupied by anybody else. The next Order in Council is dated 8th of September, 1903. Under section 42 of the regulations governing placer mining, no officer or person employed by the government of Canada in any capacity whatever, or no officer or member of the militia force is able to hold or record a mining claim. This was so broad in its terms that it included the members of the Dawson Volunteer Rifle Company, and this Order in Council was passed to remove the prohibition from them.

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CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAGGART.

That is all right.

Mr. SIFTON- The next Order in Council is dated 17th of November, 1903. Section 2 of the regulations provide that a free miner may renew a certificate within thirty days on paying an additional fee of $5. On the 2nd of October, 1902 a man named E.A. Dixon got a free miner's certificate and on the 14th of January following the ' Mining Recorder ' at Whitehorse issued a renewal certificate and antedated it the 2nd of October, 1902. The attention of the mining recorder was called to the fact that the date was greater than ninety days and in reply he stated be overlooked the fact and hoped it would not entail any loss to Mr. Dixon who owned considerable mining claims. This Order in Council was passed to protect Mr. Dixon from the error of the mining recorder. The Order in Council passed dated 26th November, 1903, reduces the fee for free miners' certificates from 810 to $7.50. The Order in Council dated the 28th of November, 1903, relates to the question of the royalty. Section 52 of the quartz mining regulations provides that the patent shall reserve to the Crown forever, whatever royalty may be imposed on the sales of the products of all mines ; such royalty not to exceed five per cent. My hon. friends will understand that there is one set of regulations relating to placer mines and another relating to quartz mines. The quartz mining regulation provided that after a certain period the owner of the mine could secure a patent for the land, the patent reserving the Crown's right to a royalty. At the time this provision was made in the regulations a royalty of 10 per cent on the output of placer mining claims in the Yukon Territory, less an annual exemption, was collected. The royalty on gold shipped from the Yukon Territory, however, was reduced to 2J per cent by Order in Council dated the 21st of May, 1902. So that under the Order in Council relating to quartz mining there was the power to reserve the royalty of 5 per cent, but the general royalty on placer mines was only 2i per cent. Miners in the territory represented that a royalty of 5 per cent might be collected on the

gold taken from quartz Mining locations, and a further royalty of 24 per cent might be collected on the same gold when it was shipped from the territory, and in order that a uniform rate might be charged on all gold taken from mining claims, the Order in Council of the 28th of November, 1903, provided that patent for a mining location in the Yukon Territory shall reserve to the Crown for ever the same royalty upon the products of the location as is provided or which may hereafter be provided in the case of placer mining claims, and in Manitoba and . the Northwest Territories the patent for the mining location shall reserve to the Crown for ever a royalty not exceeding 2J per cent. It will be seen that the purport of this Order in Council was simply to harmonize the provisions respecting royalty between placer mines and quartz mines, making them the same amount, 24 per cent.

The Order in Council dated 28th November. 1903, Privy Council, No. 1954. Certain persons obtained entry for placer mining claims situated on Lindow Creek, a tributary of Bear Creek, within the limits of the hydraulic mining location situated on the Klondike river in the Yukon Territory after the lease had been issued, but before it had been received at Dawson. The question arose as to whether or not these claims should be renewed, and until that question arose, free miners were not permitted to perform on the claims the amount of work required by the regulations to entitle them to renewal of entry. That is to say, there being a dispute as to their right to enter on' these claims, the placer miners could not go on the claims and do the work they were required to do. The Order in Council dated the 28th of November. 1903, authorized the Minister of the Interior to grant renewal of entry for the claims in question without requiring payment to be made in lieu of representation work for the portion of the year during which the claim holders were stopped in their operations owing to the conflict with the hydraulic mining leaseholder. That is to say, they were stopped from doing the work by reason of the fact that the matter was in litigation, otherwise, they would have done it. This work is practically waived. They were prevented from going on, and we therefore did not fine them or compel them to pay the commutation fee.

Order in Council dated the 7th of December, 1902. Privy Council, No. 1311. is precisely the same as the last one, except that the claims were situated in a different mining leasehold.

Order in Council dated the 21st of December, 1903. Privy Council. No. 2011. The gold commissioner having reported in favour of granting compensation to certain persons who had sustained losses by reason of a

mistake made by an official, the lower half of placer mining claim No. 93 was granted by the gold commissioner to these people, and this Order in Council relieves them from the necessity of doing representation .work on the claim. At the time the claim was granted, it was not the intention that they should do representation work, and this Order in Council carries out the original intention which was not apparently clearly expressed in the first order.

The Order in Council dated 30th of January, 1904, Privy Council, No. 171, provides that the commissioner of the Yukon Territory may withdraw from mining entry, under the regulations in that behalf, any vacant ground required as a reservoir site or for any other purpose in connection with the storage of water, but only such ground as has been thoroughly prospected and lias been found to be worthless for placer mining purposes.

The Order in Council dated the 2nd of February, 1904, Privy Council, No. 192. rescinds the regulations relating to hydraulic mining leases. These regulations had been in force for some years, but having been found to be in some respects unsatisfactory, they have been rescinded pending general consideration of the subject.

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Motion agreed to.


STATION ACCOMMODATION AT STE.

PERPETUE.

CON

Georges Ball

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GEORGES BALL.

Mr. Speaker, before the Orders of the Day are called. I [DOT] desire to draw the attention of the government to the fact that a few months ago the people of St. Perpetue, in the county of Nieolet, addressed a petition to the government asking for a depot, or at least an accommodation car, to be placed at the station there, for the use of the public as a waiting-room. I saw the hon. minister a few days ago, and he informed me that the matter was in the hands of Mr- Pott-inger, the manager of the Intercolonial Railway, and that the application of the people [DOT]would very soon be granted. I was very much surprised yesterday, in passing the place, to observe that not even a passenger car has been provided for the accommodation of the people, but only a box car, which is hardly suitable even for a freight shed. I am sure that the hon. minister is not aware of this, or he would give orders to have it changed. St. Perpetue is a pretty important place, but it is not provided with either a telegraph or a telephone, and the people, not knowing whether the trains are on time or not, often have to wait, and there is no accommodation for them at all. I therefore hope that the hon. minister will see that accommodation is provided without delay.

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CANADIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS.

CON

Samuel Barker

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SAMUEL BARKER.

Before tlie Orders of the Day are called, I wish to call attention to some correspondence in the Montreal ' Star ' of yesterday. The correspondence relates to a despatch cabled by the Canadian Associated Press, which purported to give remarks made by Mr. Timothy Healy, M.P., in the imperial House of Commons, regarding what is called the Dundonald incident. The despatch referred to is as follows :

Mr. Healy said he believed that Lord Dun-donald had attacked the government of Canada because it was French Catholic. It was very useful to have French Catholics on the side of the British empire during the Boer war ; but1 now that the war was over, an officer of the imperial army made partisan statements outraging the feelings of the majority of the people of Canada. He would like to know why Lord Dundonald has been permitted to remain while his speech was rankling in the French hearts.

No one can doubt that that language is of a most inflammatory nature and calculated to create racial trouble in this country. No one can doubt that if the statements made here were concocted by the Associated Press, they .must have been designed with a purpose to cause racial trouble and injure one of the political parties in this country. The London ' Times ' gave its version of the same speech in these words :

The government has come forward and announced that they had recalled the officer whose conduct had been complained of ; but Lord Dundonald while he remained on Canadian soil was an imperial officer, and for six weeks the government allowed him to remain after he had outraged the feelings of the majority of the people.

You will observe that the reference there is to the people of Canada at large and there is not the slightest allusion or reference to any particular race, the French race or any other. Mr. Healy was communicated with by the correspondent of the Montreal ' Star.' and he wrote to the correspondent as follows :

I have received several abusive letters from Canada and a visit from the gentleman who sent on there my alleged speech in reference to my supposed utterances, and I am a little surprised at further inquiry by another journalist.

It appears therefore that the representative of the Associated Press has been in communication with Mr. Healy and of course has had the opportunity to correct this despatch if he desired to do so. He also had access to the official reports of the House of Commons and could have corrected his despatch by that means if be had chosen to do so. What does Mr. Healy go on to say ?

I simply did not use the words which were cabled at such needless expense to Canada.

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CON

Georges Ball

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BALL.

I did say what the ' Times ' printed, and a little more, which would even further have modified the sense.

The ' Star ' correspondent goes on to add :

The authorized and official account of the parliamentary debates agrees exactly with the London * Times ' report.

It is therefore clear that the expressions as to the French and French Catholics were concocted.

Without occupying the time of the House longer, I desire to say that I cannot imagine a more wicked attempt to misrepresent the utterances of a public man on a subject occupying the attention of Canada than this cable despatch referring to the French element in this country. If any language could be used more calculated to cause racial strife, I do not know where to find it; and I can come to no other conclusion than that the gentlemen connected with this Canadian Associated Press, subsidized as it is by the people of Canada to the extent of 815,000 a year, paid through the Finance Minister, are deliberately misrepresenting for party purposes news which should be sent without reference to party or any other consideration than the strict truth. We know that the reason for giving this $15,000 a year subsidy was that we were being furnished by cable with news doctored and coloured in the interests of our neighbours across the line, and we resented that and were willing to pay $15,000 a year to get the truth. But we seem to be worse served than before. This Associated Press appears to have become a mere party tool to be used for party purposes, and I think I am not improperly taking up the time of tlie House in calling attention to that fact. I am quite sure that if this despatch bad _ been a reflection on the government of the day or the political party represented by this government, it would not have been necessary for anybody in this House to call attention to it. The hon. the Finance Minister would have intervened and told the people connected with the Canadian Associated Press that if they did not conduct themselves in a proper manner their subsidy would be stopped.

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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. W. S. FIELDING (Minister of Finance).

1 bad not the good fortune to hear the flrst portion of the hon. member's remarks, but I understand their general tenor was to question the fairness and impartiality of the Associated Press despatches! Well, the government have absolutely nothing to do with this business beyond the fact that we have made a grant to a Canadian newspaper organization to assist it in what was supposed to be a very worthy purpose. We make grants to various societies and organizations in Canada over which we have no control or management; and if they should cease serving a good purpose, we should cease making the grants. No member of the gov-

eminent has the slightest part in connection with these despatches or the slightest control over them. We are precisely, in that respect, in the same position as my hon. friend. I know that sometimes complaints are made that the material sent over is not of the most substantial character. As an old journalist, I can make some allowance for that. I know that when it is a man's duty to send a daily despatch, he cannot always find news of surpassing importance ; and in his anxiety to send news, he may be tempted to send what in the minds of some readers may seem light, frivolous and unimportant. I have heard some criticisms on news sent over which to many of us might seem uninteresting. But all classes make up the world, and there are many newspaper* readers who may receive with more interest flimsy matters than the more substantial matters which would interest us as members of parliament. -

As regards the question of impartiality, all I know is that the principal oflicer who prepares these despatches is a gentleman who is known to be a Conservative, and whatever interest he may take in politics in Canada would naturally be on the Conservative side. He is a brother of the proprietor of a Conservative newspaper in Canada, Mr. J. Ross Robertson, of th'e Toronto ' Telegram,' a former member of this House on the Conservative side. I met Mr. Robertson in England some years ago and found him a gentleman of good standing in the newspaper profession. I have no reason to doubt that he is doing his duty faithfully and impartially. Sometimes things appear in these despatches of which hon. gentlemen on the other side will disapprove, and sometimes things appear which we on this side think give too much prominence to views antagonistic to those of the Liberal party. If he seems to lean to one side or other, he is simply presenting the view that comes to him, trying to convey the views expressed by some public man or some newspaper. In the condensation of a speech or newspaper article there is always a danger of producing a result which one party or the other will think is biased. Therefore, I would not assume that the gentlemen engaged in this work have any other desire than to do that which is best, for the service in which they are engaged. Making allowance for some of the news which may not please everybody, I am inclined to think that the service has been a good one for Canada. It has been a good one in this respect at least, that we certainly receive more information than formerly of what is going on in Canadian circles in England, and of the indications of interest taken by the British press and the British public men in Canadian affairs. If an English public man makes a speech or writes a letter touching Canadian affairs it is sent out to us. Sometimes, we are apt to

think that these things are hardly worth sending out. But certainly we get more information concerning Canadian affairs in England than we formerly did. In this way I think the service is a useful one. However, we are no more concerned in the matter than hon. gentlemen opposite are.

I would remind them that this service is directed by an organization of newspaper men in Canada, not of one side alone but of both sides, who look at the service from the point of view of journalism, the collection and dissemination of news. As I say, both parties are represented in the association. Both parties were represented in the deputation who came to the government and asked co-operation and assistance in establishing this service. If the-service is open to criticism, I think we should criticise it and endeavour to have it made better. But I would not accept hastily the conclusion that the gentlemen who prepare the news are partisans, least of all that they are partisans against hon. gentlemen opposite, or are trying to assist our side.

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Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. SAM. HUGHES.

I have watched with interest to see what explanation the hon. minister (Mr. Fielding) would give of the exposure of absolute misstatements with regard to the speech of Mr. Healy. And he offers no explanation at all.

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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

I did not hear that part.

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Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. SAM. HUGHES.

Mr. Healy himself repudiates it. Now, I have been giving a little attention to the manner in which this information-so-called information-is collected in the old land and how these reports from time to time are prepared. The reports have shown so much bias that even people in the rural districts of Canada are led to remark that the English correspondents are all loaded up the wrong way. I find that, while what the Finance Minister says is true, and these two gentlemen who send out the news to this country are supposed to be employed by an association-I do not know who compose that association -yet the manner in which they gather their news is, to say the least, equivocal. Now, as to Mr. Robertson being a Conservative, it is true that he is the brother of Mr. John Ross Robertson who has been an independent with Conservative leanings and who occupied a seat on this side of the House and criticised the government very severely. But any one who reads the columns of the Toronto 'Telegram' wi.'l see that if there is an independent journal in Canada its name is the Toronto ' Telegram.' It criticises both sides fearlessly. But the brother of Mr. John Ross Robertson was always a Liberal and is a Liberal to-day. Mr. Robertson's other brother in Toronto is one of the prominent Liberals of that city. Thus, so far as politics are concerned the

burden of evidence is that these press representatives would be inclined to favour the Liberals. The minister says that these gentlemen send to Canada what English public men who make speeches or write letters say concerning Canada. Let me point out that they do more. Through the agencies of the Minister of Agriculture and the Minister of the Interior, statements are communicated by the officers of the government to the English country press favourable to the government. This puffery bureau that was in existence here is now, I believe, in existence in England, *Scotland, Wales and Ireland. And these correspondents, possibly without design, possibly without collusion with the officers of the government, pick up their little notes, editorial articles and other items of various kinds that appear in' the English country press, which, of course are laudatory of the gentlemen occupying the Treasury benches in Canada, and cable them out at the expense of the people of Canada to our press here. That is the explanation that is furnished me and it is the best explanation, I believe, that can be offered. But that explanation is not satisfactory in any sense of the term to hon. gentlemen on this side of the House. Now this will help to explain the use of the word ' foreigner ' at Henley which has been so much discussed. On that subject I have these data : The expression ' foreigner ' was used by a Canadian in the service of the Canadian government speaking to this gentleman who cabled it out to Canada. It was used by this officer of the Canadian government and by no other man. And, on the strength of that expression the cable comes out to this country giving the impression that the expression ' the foreigner wins ' greeted the victory of Scholes all along the line. The expression was used by a paid servant of the Department of the Interior to this gentleman who was the paid representative of the Canadian Associated Press, and the impression was given to the people of this country that the crowds on the banks of the river Thames received the great victory of Scholes with the cry ' the foreigner wins.'

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LIB

Alexander Johnston

Liberal

Mr. ALEX. JOHNSTON.

Would my hon. friend (Mr. Sam. Hughes) give the House an explanation

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Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. SAM. HUGHES.

The hon. gentleman's hon. friend is standing here and speaking on his responsibility as a member of this House, and he is not called -upon, in answer to every back-bench member on the other side, to give names in support of his statement.

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LIB

Alexander Johnston

Liberal

Mr. ALEX. JOHNSTON.

Perhaps my hon. friend will permit me to ask him a question ?

Mr. iSAM. HUGHES. If the hon. gentleman (Mr. Alex. Johnston) asks it as a privi-Mr. SAM. HUGHES.

lege, I will allow it, but if he demands it as a right, I will not allow it.

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LIB

Alexander Johnston

Liberal

Mr. ALEX. JOHNSTON.

I do not demand it as a right; I ask the hon. gentleman's permission to ask him a question.

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August 6, 1904