August 2, 1904

LIB

Henry Robert Emmerson (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. EMMERSON.

One very good reason is that it is necessary to protect the territory of the Intercolonial from invasion by a rival corporation, and to siacure to the Intercolonial an entrance into the heart of the province of New Brunswick. If that

Canada Eastern road were in possession of the Canadian Pacific Railway, for instance, it would enable the Canadian Pacific to go into the territory which has been peculiarly the territory of the Intercolonial and to compete with it for its best paying traffic. That is the main reason why I advocate the purchase of the road.

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

What would be the net profit to the Intercolonial of the traffic capable of being diverted ?

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink
LIB

Henry Robert Emmerson (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. EMMERSON.

I have not an estimate ; but it would affect the traffic of the whole Intercolonial-the traffic reaching into Quebec and Montreal and the province of Ontario-and would take from the control of the Intercolonial that which it has to-day. There would be a direct loss, and in addition to that a far greater indirect loss.

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

It is of no value to the committee to say that it affects the whole traffic of the Intercolonial, because we all know that it cannot do anything of the kind. Mr. Tiffin's report, which covers the entire interchange of traffic between the Intercolonial and this road, gives $57,000 of freight in one direction and $27,000 in another direction; and if we assume that the whole of that traffic will be diverted, which we should not assume for one moment, it would be a loss of $84,000, on which I do not know what the net profit would be. It is useless to say that it affects the entire traffic of the Intercolonial Railway, which amounts to a great many millions of dollars. I understand the minister to say that this road was not taken over in pursuance of any general policy. If it is on the particular merits of the enterprise, I think I can point out other roads in New Brunswick which would be as desirable, which would afford quite as remunerative a traffic, and which would possess all the strategic elements this road possesses. I thought possibly the minister might announce to us that the government had decided upon a policy with regard to all roads similarly situated in the maritime provinces. I do not know any reason why there should be a distinction between this road and a great many others that might be referred to. It i seems to me that it should not be under-I taken except in pursuance of some general policy. The Intercolonial Railway is joined by a great many roads in my own province, for example, the Midland, the Dominion Atlantic, the road running through Inverness county, and there may be others that do not occur to me at this moment. In New Brunswick there are also a great number of small branch lines which join the Intercolonial, and some of which would I believe be more efficiently operated by the government than they are by the companies which own them at present ; and possibly they might possess some strategic value which the minister thinks is pos-

sessed by this road. It would have been more satisfactory to me to have known from the minister whether or not there is a general policy of that kind, because, otherwise, I do not quite appreciate the reasons which have induced the government to enter into this enterprise. I am sure the minister himself would have been the first to concede that there are many other roads in the maritime provinces which would come within, every possible reason which he has suggested to the committee as justification for the government taking over this road. Have there been applications to the government from companies owning other lines in the maritime provinces to take them over ?

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink
LIB

Henry Robert Emmerson (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. EMMERSON.

There were petitions circulated with respect to the line running from St. Stephen to St. John via St. George. That is the only line as to which there was any application that I can recall.

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink
CON

John Waterhouse Daniel

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DANIEL.

Is that the line said to be owned by Russell Sage ?

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink
LIB

Henry Robert Emmerson (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. EMMERSON.

It is the line known as the Shore Line road.

Resolutions reported, read the first and second time and agreed to.

Mr. EMMERSON moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 163)) authorizing the government of Canada to purchase the Canada Eastern Railway and to take possession of the Fredericton and St. Mary's Railway bridge.

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink

Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time. Mr. FIELDING moved the ajournment of the House.


CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

What business tomorrow ?

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink
LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

I understand it is the intention to move that the House go into Committee of Supply early to-morrow so as to give my hon. friend from Pictou opportunity to move an amendment. But in advance we might agree to put the Militia Bill through its final stage.

Topic:   PURCHASE OF THE CANADA EASTERN RAILWAY.
Permalink

Motion agreed to, and House adjourned at 12.35 a.m., Wednesday.



Wednesday, August 3, 1904.


August 2, 1904