July 13, 1904

?

Mr. BELL asked :

1. What amount of duty, excise and customs,

was paid on tobacco in the years ending June 30th, 1903 and 1904. .

2. What part of these duties was due to the increased duty imposed by the tariff of 1897.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   SPEED OF MAIL STEAMSHIPS.
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LIB

Hon. L. P. BRODEUR (Minister of Inland Revenue) : (Minister of Inland Revenue)

Liberal

1. Excise duty, year ended June 30th, 1903, $4,883,552.59. The amount for 1904 cannot lie given, as returns from outlying divisions are not yet all received at department.

2. From excise $1,513,968.28, made up as follows : From foreign raw leaf tobacco, 81,249,569.17 ; from additional duty on cigarettes made from foreign raw leaf, 8264,309.11.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   SPEED OF MAIL STEAMSHIPS.
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DEATH OF MR. JOHN McINTOSH, M.P.

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Rt. Hon. Sir WILFRID LAURIER (Prime Minister).

The press has already informed the members of this House that it has been our misfortune to lose one of our colleagues, in the person of Mr. John McIntosh, member for the city of Sherbrooke. Mr. McIntosh has been carried away after a severe illness which had lasted for many years ; in fact, when Mr. McIntosh entered this House, some four years ago, he was already suffering from the illness which finally caused

his death, and at that time, as I am personally aware, it was only his strong attachment to his party and his long and well-deserved popularity in the city of Sherbrooke, which induced him-nay, rather compelled him-to accept the candidature and become a member of this House. Under such circumstances, it was not possible for Mr. McIntosh, as a member of this House, to give us the full measure of his abilities or to enable us to judge what sort of man he was. I do not believe that even to his friends on the other side of the House the real man was fully known. Perhaps in this sense I was more privileged than many of his political friends, because for a great many years it was my personal privilege to know him-I will not say intimately-but, at all events, sufficiently, I think, to he counted as among Mr. McIntosh's friends. It will be eighteen years next fall since I first met Mr McIntosh. I then met him during a contest in the eastern townships, which was bitterly fought-if that expression is not too strong-between the two parties in the province of Quebec. I had then the privilege of meeting Mr. McIntosh many and many a time, and then and there I formed the highest possible estimate of his character. At that time, I may say without exaggeration, he was a perfect type of manhood, physical manhood, and manhood in every sense of the word. Nor am I at all exaggerating when I say that I do not think I ever met a more honourable man. It is with all my heart that I associate myself with the mourning of his friends and of his family.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. JOHN McINTOSH, M.P.
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Mr. I@

I thank the Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Uaurier) very much for the very appropriate and kindly words which he has uttered in regard to Mr. McIntosh. The lamented death of that gentleman has caused many regrets, not only on this side of the House, but, I am sure, on the other side as well. Mr. McIntosh had filled many important public positions in this country, and it is true, as -the Prime Minister has said, that we have not seen him at his best in parliament, owing to the suffering which he continually endured from the fatal disease which eventually carried him off in the prime of life. His entry into this parliament was, I believe, induced by the most absolutely unselfish and patriotic motives. He came here against his will at a time when he felt that the interests of his country and of his party demanded that he should do so. Since his entry into parliament I have always found him a faithful colleague and a true and unselfish friend. I believe that the public life of Canada has not produced any better or higher type of public man than that which John McIntosh exemplified. He endured his illness with characteristic fortitude and with true Christian resignation. It is only a day or two since I received a letter from him, in which he spoke in the most calm and philosophical manner of the sufferings he Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

was enduring and of the prospect of a release. I am sure that we can extend to his family and to his friends the sincere condolence and sympathy of every member of this House without exception.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. JOHN McINTOSH, M.P.
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CON

Thomas Chase Casgrain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. C. CASGRAIN.

(Translation.) Mr. Speaker, as an old colleague of Mr. Mc-Iutosh in the Quebec government, I may be permitted to add my humble testimony to the eloquent tributes which have just been pronounced by my rigid hon. friend, the Prime Minister, and the hon. leader of the opposition, upon the passing of the hon. member for Sherbrooke, one of the most esteemed members of this House. His death, although not quite unexpected, still came as a shock, not only to his friends on this side of the House, but, I am sure, to the members on the other side as well.

Mr. McIntosh was first returned to the legislature of the province of Quebec in 1886. In 1890 he came back before his constituents, and owing to his popularity, victory did not desert him, although the Conservative party were then struggling under very trying circumstances. As a matter of fact. Mr. Mercier had so endeared [DOT]himself to the hearts of the people that it was no easy task for his opponents to secure a fav-vourable verdict. But as Mr. McIntosh had won the confidence and the esteem not only of the people of Sherbrooke, but of every class of the community in the eastern townships, he succeeded in overcoming those difficulties. In 1892, Mr. de Boucherville [DOT]having been entrusted with the responsibility of forming a cabinet, Mr. McIntosh was invited to enter the administration ; and later on, ^hen the Taillon government succeeded that of Mr. de Boucherville, our late lamented colleague was again asked to become a member of the administration. In the various positions w'hicli he has filled, whether as a member of the Quebec legislature or as a member of the government of that province, it may truly be said that [DOT]his never-tiring industry and his ideal devotion to the common weal never faltered. He w-as also chosen as a representative of our province at the great Chicago fair, and there also he discharged his duties in such a manner as to elicit universal praise. The many regrets caused by the lamented death of Mr. McIntosh are not circumscribed to the eastern townships, but I am warranted In saying that they are shared by the whole province of Quebec.

1 join heartily in the kind words uttered by my right hon. friend, the Prime Minister and by the hon. leader of the opposition, and I voice the feelings of sorrow caused on both sides of Che House by the death of so highly esteemed a colleague.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. JOHN McINTOSH, M.P.
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CON

Rufus Henry Pope

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RUFUS H. POPE.

May I be permitted to add a word to what has been so eloquently said by the leader of the govern-

ment, and by the leader of the opposition, on this sad occasion. The late Mr. McIntosh entered public life as the representative of the county which I now have the honour to represent in this House. I knew him personally for many years, and I can say that he wa's an honest and noble-hearted man, who possessed to a remarkable degree the confidence of all nationalities and of all political parties Jn the eastern townships. Beloved by those who knew him most intimately and respected by all in that section of the country, his public and private life will long be remembered as worthy of emulation by those who follow him.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. JOHN McINTOSH, M.P.
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POST OFFICE MATTERS.

CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GEO. TAYLOR.

I wish to draw the attention of the Postmaster General to a letter I received this morning from the Frankville post office, in the county of Leeds, and a portion of which letter is as follows

You told me not to stamp letters addressed to you in Ottawa. I must say that our postmaster refused to seud them without stamps and offered to bet me any amount that there was no law to bear me out in any such thing. Please give me the plain facts.

I imagine this is a newly-appointed postmaster, and I would like to know from the Postmaster General whether postmasters are instructed not to receive unstamped communications addressed to members of parliament in Ottawa ? I understand the law to be, that all communications addressed to members while the House is in session are carried through the mails free of postage. This postmaster has absolutely refused to obey the law, and I wish to know from the Postmaster General what justification he has.

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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LIB

William Mulock (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Sir WILLLIAM MULOCK.

I do not know whether my hon. friend (Air. Taylor) questions me for the purpose of determining who should win this bet, or whet ter it is to know if that postmaster is discharging his duty.

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR.

There was no bet; the postmaster offered to bet, but my constituent very properly would not bet with him.

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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LIB

William Mulock (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Sir WILLIAM AIULOCK.

There was no one to take the postmaster up. Aly hon. friend (Mr. Taylor) has correctly stated the law on the subject,-is that the envelope in your hand ?

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR.

Yes ; addressed to ' Geo. Taylor, ALP.. Ottawa ' ; and he had to put a two-cent stamp on it.

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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Sir WILLIAM ML LOCK@

Well, if my hon. friend (Air. Taylor) makes a requisition we will have the two cents refunded along with that small item for express charges referred to last year. I will see that the postmaster in question, if a new man,

be instructed in his duties so that my hon. friend will not suffer any more.

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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CON

Thomas Chase Casgrain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Air. T. CHASE CASGRAIN.

I received a post office order from .loilette, P.Q.. yesterday and I notice that it is printed entirely in the English language. I have always seen these forms in both English and French, and of course in a county like Jo-liette as well as in other parts of Quebec it is a very serious inconvenience to the people who wish to send post office orders and who may not understand the English language. Has there been aiiy change made, and if so, why are these forms not printed in the French language ?

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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LIB

William Mulock (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Sir WILLI AAI AIULOCK.

This is the first I have heard of such a matter, and I think there can be no such change. It may be that there has been a mistake on the part of the postmaster in handing out an English form to a French-speaking citizen.

I presume that in some of the offices where the patrons speak both languages it is necessary to supply the postmaster with forms printed in each language, and through inadvertence the postmaster likely issued the wrong form. Aly hon. friend (Air. Casgrain) may rest assured that the department has in no way authorized a departure from the proper procedure which would insure that an English form should be given to an English patron of the post office, and a French form to a French patron. I will attend to the matter.

Topic:   POST OFFICE MATTERS.
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SCHOOL OF AIUSKETRY.

L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Air. SAAI. HUGHES.

I have received a communication to the effect that the young men who have come here to learn musketry are being taxed for the maintenance of clubs, for the maintenance of an extra mess, and for extra furnishings generally. I am also informed that privates are called upon to act as servants to officers, and that these young men who are brought from the farms to learn musketry are subjected to prison discipline. They cannot leave the camp grounds unless they get a pass and they must be in at a certain hour in the evening or they are disciplined. I am told that a number of officers and men were informed that they need not bring extra clothing or bedding, but that they had to purchase them here at considerable expense. I do not know whether or not the officer in charge of the musketry school is responsible for this. This officer goes on to say that he thinks the country pays the Cartwright family dearly enough without having the men who come to take the musketry course taxed by this extra expense. I do not think the people of this country want the young gentlemen, privates or officers who come here, to be subject to prison rule. I do not believe that a young man who comes here and chances to be a

private, should give up one hour of his time to act as servant to any officer, nor do I think that the country should pay these men to act as officers' servants. 1 direct the attention of the minister to these grievances which I believe are founded on fact, and which should be stopped at once. I do not ask him to give any answer to-day, as I have not had time to give him notice that I would bring it up.

Topic:   SCHOOL OF AIUSKETRY.
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LIB

Frederick William Borden (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal

Sir FREDERICK BORDEN.

This school of musketry has been in operation for a couple of years, awl this is the first time I have heard any complaint. I was not aware that the system in force this year differed from that of previous years. I am sorry that my: hon. friend (Mr. Sam. Hughes) saw fit to make the reference he did to the Cartwright family. I scarcely see what that has to do with it. and I am sure that my hon. friend himself would be the last man to say or to insinuate that any charges that may be imposed on officers attending the school could go into the pocket of as honourable a gentleman as Col. Robert Cartwright is known to be. I am sorry that he made that gratuitous slip. I am very glad, however, that he has called my attention to the fact, and I will make inquiry and be prepared to make a statement on the subject.

Topic:   SCHOOL OF AIUSKETRY.
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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. SAM. HUGHES.

My remarks did not directly' or indirectly lead to the inference that one dollar or one farthing of this money went into the pocket of Col. Cartwright, and the minister must have known that. But if the Cartwright family have to be provided for at the public expense, it will have to be done without taxing the officers on the ranges. The minister must not run away with the notion that we are going to bow down to the Cartwright family or any other family in this country.

Topic:   SCHOOL OF AIUSKETRY.
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July 13, 1904