May 30, 1904

PRIVATE BILLS-EXTENSION OF TIME

LIB

William Manley German

Liberal

Mr. WM. M. GERMAN moved :

That the petition of John Murphy and others, presented this day, praying that the necessary leave be granted to lay before the House the petition of Edward R. Cahoone for the passing of an Act extending and confirming the extension of time to construct, &c., under certain letters patent, notwithstanding the expiration of the time for presenting petitions for private Bills be read and received, and referred tp the Select Standing Committee on Standing Orders. .

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

I think there should be some explanation of the delay.

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LIB

William Manley German

Liberal

Mr. GERMAN.

The delay has arisen, as I understand it on instructions, from the fact that the solicitor who had been engaged to look after the matter misunderstood our General Patent Act He was under the impression that under the statute, which he thought rather ambiguous, it was not necessary to make application to the officers ot the department to extend the time for manufacturing beyond the two years' limit provided for by the law, and the two years' time had passed before he was made aware of the fact that the law made such an application necessary. Not having made the application to the department, he is advised to get the parliament of Canada to pass aD Act extending the time. Whether that is to be granted or not is another matter. But there has been a bona fide mistake on the part of the solicitor who had the matter in charge.

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Motion agreed to.


COTE ST. PAUL BRIDGE.

CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. F. D. MONK.

Before the Orders of the Day are proceeded with, I am obliged to call the attention of. the government once more to the state of affairs that exists in Cote St. Paul in regard to the bridge over the Lachine canal. The superstructure is not being proceeded with, or, at any rate, is not being proceeded with with the expedition which, it seems to me, the government should have the right to exact from the contractor, and the public are suffering very great inconvenience indeed from the delay in the execution of the work. I understand that the contractors have many buildings under way in the city of Montreal, but it must be evident that it will cause greater inconvenience to the public to have this bridge neglected than to have delay in the construction of buildings. There is not in the contract, as I am informed, any clause providing a penalty in case the required works are not finished within a specified

time ; and, probably, tbe contractors, who have this clause In most contracts, are availing themselves of the absence of it in the contract for this bridge. Under these circumstances, and in view of the number of letters of protest that I am receiving every day from people in the locality, I would suggest to the government the advisability of serving the contractors with a protest. If they were served with a formal protest, it would undoubtedly have the effect of hurrying up the work somewhat.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER (Prime Minister).

I know that the matter has been brought to the attention of the department. But I will call the attention of the minister to the suggestion of my hon. friend (Mr. Monk).

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SPEECHES OF LORD STRATHCONA

LIB

Joseph Henri Napoléon Bourassa

Liberal

Mr. HENRI BOURASSA.

Before the Orders of the Day are called, I wish to call the attention of the government to some speeches that have been made by our High Commissioner in London, Lord Strathcona. A few weeks ago attention was called in the Senate to a speech by Mr. Preston, Commissioner of Immigration, in which he had expressed some opinions which were not thought to be in conformity with the imperialist gospel. To the question asked in the Senate, the Secretary of State replied- very properly, I think-that the government were in no way responsible for the utterances of Mr. Preston, and did not wish to be understood as siding with one party or another in England. Lord Strathcona. speaking on the 14th of May, expressed himself very strongly-as he has done on previous occasions-in favour of the policy of discrimination on the part of England as between the colonies and foreign countries. On previous occasions the noble lord advocated the idea of creating an imperial council. Of course, I have the greatest respect for Lord Strathcona and for his personal opinions on British or imperial politics, but it seems to me rather improper that the official representative of Canada should be understood as taking an active part in British politics and as siding with one or other of the political parties in England. I think it is also undesirable that it should be understood that such utterances are endorsed by the Canadian government, or are meant to express the opinion of the Canadian cabinet. I suppose that when the Canadian cabinet has an opinion to express it must express it in Canada and under its responsibility to the parliament of Canada. It seems to me that some declaration might be made as to Lord Strath cona's speeches similar to that which has been 4nade in the upper House with regard to the speeches of Mr. Preston.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

My colleague the Secretary of State speaking in the other

House expressed the view that the government is not responsible for any acts or words spoken by any of its officers if they do not act in their official capacity. Lord Strathcona, we are all glad to know, occupies, in addition to his position as High Commissioner for Canada, a very high position in the social and political world of Great Britain. He has expressed his views on many occasions on different subjects, but I am bound to say, in justice to him, that I am not aware that he has ever on such occasions presumed^ to speak on behalf of the Canadian government. He simply expressed his views and of course he has a right to his own opfnions, but in so doing he does not in any way bind the government of which he is an official.

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INQUIRY FOR RETURNS.

?

Mr. A. A.@

LEiFURGEY. I beg to call at tention to the fact that on April 25, I received an order for copies of documents and reports in connection with the Murray Harbour Railway and Hillsborough bridge, and also an order for details of the actual cost of construction of the Murray Harbour Railway. Up to the present time I have had no return. I may say that before putting this motion on the order paper I had placed questions on the paper, but the minister requested that an order should be asked for and said he would give fuller explanations.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Will my hon. friend give me the subject and the

date ?

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CON

Alfred Alexander Lefurgey

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LEFURGEY.

The Murray Harbour Railway and the Hillsborough bridge. The 25th of April.

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CON

Haughton Lennox

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAUGHTON LENNOX.

I wish in the absence of the member for Leeds (Mr. Taylor) to inquire as to a return in reference to cheese curing at Brockville and Woodstock. I do not see the Minister of Agriculture in the House at the moment, but he promised that these papers would be brought down on Friday.

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AMENDMENTS TO RAILWAY ACT.

IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. WT. F. MACLEAN.

Before the Orders of the Day are called, I would like to ask the First Minister when the government are likely to introduce an Act amending the General Railway Act. The hon. member for Lincoln (Mr. Lancaster) and myself have public Bills in that directiou and we would like to get on with them. But we would like to proceed with them perhaps under the auspices of a government measure, and if the government intend to bring down such a measure and will bring it down at an early date we could probably have a discussion on all these points under the one order. My object is to obtain from the leader of the House, or from the Minister of Justice a

declaration as to whether such a measure is likely to be brought down by the government and when we may expect it.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

The Minister of Justice I think is ready to introduce the Bill of which he gave notice the other day in committee of the House. It may come up this week.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN.

Would it be agreeable to the government then to discuss all these amendments to the general law under one order ?

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May 30, 1904