May 18, 1904

'3315 COMMONS


some time ago and I made inquiry then. I tound that the mails were despatched by the Grand Trunk express which reaches Brockyille at the hour named, and if it is on time they are transferred to the Canadian Pacific at Brockyille and brought to Ottawa. If the mails fail to reach Ottawa the same day it is not because of their not being on the Grand Trunk train, but it is because of the train not making connection.


CON

Uriah Wilson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WILSON.

The Brockyille train coming to Ottawa leaves Brockyille before the mail train on the Grand Trunk reaches Brockyille.

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LIB
CON
CON

Uriah Wilson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WILSON.

I come here nearly every Monday, and I think I ought to know. The fast train passes the mail train at Kingston. We get that train to Brockyille and if we do not get there in time to make connection with the Canadian Pacific Railway, we have to go on to Coteau..

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LIB

William Mulock (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Sir WILLIAM MULOCK.

The mails for Ottawa that come from Toronto are transferred at Kingston junction to the fast Grand Trunk train due to arrive at Brockyille before the Canadian Pacific Railway is due to leave Brockville.

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CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR.

I think the hon. the Postmaster General is wrong except in regard to the Toronto mails. The mails gathered up at the different stations east of Toronto continue on the mail train until it arrives in Brockville. The fast train only makes three or four stops east of Toronto and passes the mail train at Kingston. If the mail train were permitted to run right through to Brockville it could get there in time to make connection. The train is held at Kingston to allow the fast train to pass, and the latter train does not take on any of tne way-station mail. I come down every Monday and I know that the passengers make connection, but the mails do not. If a mail bag from Toronto comes by the Grand Trunk Railway, it may be handed over, but there is no general mail delivery by the mail train at Brockville. I am sorry the hon. member for Kingston (Mr. Harty) is not here just now for I am quite sure he would endorse this complaint. We are paying large sums to the railways for carrying the mails, and we might as well be living in the country as in the capital, where we can only get our mails [DOT]every twenty-four hours.

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LIB

William Mulock (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

Sir WILLIAM MULOCK.

We offer the mails to every train that will carry them, and if this train does not stop after leaving Kingston until it gets to Brockville, I would like to know what can be done by us. The Grand Trunk Railway regulates its own time table ; it is running a fast express train between Toronto and Montreal which only stops at nine stations going west and four-Sir WILLIAM MULOCK.

teen stations going east, although there are fifty-five stations on that line. The mails from the west by the morning train are transferred at Kingston to the fast tram that is due to reach Brockville before the Canadian Pacific train leaves there. Inasmuch as the fast train does not stop between Kingston and Brockville, I suppose the mail cannot be put off at intermediate stations. There have been frequent interruptions in the mail service at Brockville, because the Grand Trunk has been several times late, and the Canadian Pacific Railway has felt it its duty to start on time in order to make its own connections. I inquired from the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, if they V: ould hold their train at Brockville, but they have replied that though they are anxious to oblige the public, they have to make their own connections at Smith's Falls and Ottawa.

I may say that I have received information which may or may not be correct, that passengers have frequently seen the Canadian Pacific Railway train steaming out of Brockville just as the Grand Trunk Railway train was arriving, and that in many instances passengers from the west have been subjected tp great annoyance because of this.

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CON

George Oscar Alcorn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. G. A. ALCORN.

The difficulty would appear to be, as the Postmaster General intimates, that the Canadian Pacific Railway train is not held sufficiently long at Brockville. This train sometimes stops fifteen or twentv minutes, or even a half an hour at Smith's Falls, but it will not postpone its time of starting from Brockville.

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CON

Robert Abercrombie Pringle

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. A. PRINGLE.

I call the attention of the Postmaster General to the fact that we have only one mail a day on the Ottawa and New York Railway between Ottawa and Cornwall. I can assure the hon. gentleman that this is a grpat inconvenience to the people of Cornwall and to the people living at the different stations along the line. I would suggest -to him that he should arrange that there should be a mail sent from Ottawa to Cornwall by the morning train as well as by the evening train, and that from Cornwall to Ottawa the two trains daily should be utilized for the carrying of the mail. If you mail a letter in Ottawa at six o'clock this evening, it will not reach Cornwall until about seven o'clock to-morrow night, and it is usually not delivered until the following morning. I have discussed this matter with the people of Russell, Finch, Chrysler, and other towns along the line, and they all agree that it would be a great convenience if the two daily trains on the Ottawa and New York Railway carried the mail. I ask the Postmaster General to give this matter his immediate consideration.

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CON

Edward Cochrane

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. COCHRANE.

I cannot see how the Postmaster General -can excuse the Grand Trunk Railway for the poor accommodation they are giving us east of Toronto. I have no feeling against the Grand Trunk or any other railway, but I suppose the

country pays for carrying the mails, and if so we should have a service adequate to our requirements. I can tell the Postmaster General, that for a great number of years the mail train from Toronto made connections at Brockville, and it can do so still if it starts from Toronto a few minutes earlier. There is great inconvenience caused to the people in my section of the country, at Brighton, Colborne and Grafton and other places because of the present arrangement. The very fact that the mail train remains over at Kingston to allow the express train to pass, accounts for the tardy delivery of the mail in Ottawa. If I understood the Postmaster General properly, he said that he could not control the carrying of the mails. Well, that is a sad plight for a Postmaster General to be in. If through him the country pays the railways for carrying the mails, surely he can insist that the country gets a proper mail service.

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CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR.

I see the hon. member for Kingston (Mr. Harty) now in his seat, and I think he will corroborate what I state. 'I think the hon. Postmaster General is in error in saying that the fast train carries the mail. He has led us to believe that the fast train does not stop at Gananoque. It does stop there, but it takes on no mail. The mail train gets to Kingston a good many minutes before the fast train ; but it is held there for thirty minutes for dinner, whereas if it went on it could reach Brockville and deliver the mail to the Canadian Pacific Railway train ten or twelve minutes before its time of leaving. If the statement of the hon. Postmaster General were correct, that the mail was transferred to the fast train at Kingston, the people west of Kingston could have their mail carried to Ottawa ; but there is no mail clerk on the fast train and no transfer. If the hon. Postmaster General is paying the Grand Trunk for carrying that mail, he should insist that instead of staying at Kingston it should go on to Brockville, where it would arrive in plenty of time to deliver the mail.

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William Pate Mulock

Sir WILLIAM MULOOK.

I will read a statement from the controller of the railway mail service :

Mails from Toronto and the west, and also mails received by the postal car clerks between Toronto and Kingston are transferred at Kingston Junction from the postal car train which leaves Toronto at 8 a.m. to the fast train which leaves Toronto at 9 a.m., to connect at Brockville with the Canadian Pacific Railway train leaving Brockville at 2.45 p.m.

Such connection has been missed seven times during the past month, which is no doubt due to the inclement weather, and the high water at different places along the Grand Trunk Railway between Toronto and Brockville.

The fast Grand Trunk Railway trains, operated between Montreal and Toronto, only stop at nine stations going west, and fourteen 1054

stations going east, and there are fifty-five stations between Montreal and Toronto.

The controller might add that there is seemingly no inclination on the part of either of the railway companies above mentioned to make connections at Brockville in cases when the trains of either railways are a few minutes late, and connections should be made, by trains of either railway systems awaiting five or ten minutes at Brockville.

I think it depends on the goodwill of the railways. If they were desirous of making connection at Brockville, they could make it in most eases.

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INQUIRY FOR RETURN.

CON

Edward Frederick Clarke

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. F. CLARKE.

I wish to ask the Prime Minister if any progress has been made in bringing down a return moved for a couple of months ago, respecting the correspondence in connection with the sale of the Garrison Common in Toronto.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

The Minister of Militia told me that it was understood between him and my hon. friend (Mr. Clarke), that the correspondence wTould not be brought down until it was completed. It is complete now, and will be brought down immediately.

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GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY.


House in Committee on Bill (No. 72) to amend the National Transcontinental Railway Act.-Sir Wilfrid Laurier.


CON

Charles Eusèbe Casgrain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CASGRAIN.

May I ask my hon. and learned friend the Minister of Justice if he has come to any decision as to the amendment which I proposed to the committee last night.

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May 18, 1904