April 29, 1904

FIRST READINGS.


Bill (No. 87) for the relief of James E. Taylor.-Mr. Grant. Bill (No. 90) to incorporate the Bessemer and Barry's Bay Railway Company.-Mr. Northrup. Bill (No. 91) respecting the Toronto and Hamilton Railway Company.-Mr. Calvert. Bill (No. 92) respecting certain patents of 'illiam A. Damen."-Mr. Campbell. Bill (No. 93) respecting a certain patent of A. Small.-Mr. Logan. Bill (No. 94) respecting the Temagami Railway Company.-Mr. Logan for Mr. Mc-Cool.


LACK OF SEED GRAIN.


Mr. WALTER iSCOTT (West Assiniboia). Before the Orders of the Day are called, I will crave the indulgence of the House in order to bring to the attention of the government a serious subject, which is outlined in a telegraphic message I have just received from the village of Davidson, in the Northwest Territories. The message is as follows : No seed grain here, railway seem unable to help us, cannot yoh do something to relieve situation, if no seed here soon a lot of people will suffer, answer.


F. C.WHITELOCK.


Davidson, I may explain, is the centre of a new settlement on the Prince Albert Railway, which runs between Regina and Prince Albert, and unfortunately the village is situated north of the point where a serious break has occurred in the railway line. I am led to believe that about five miles of the railway track, where it crosses the Qu'Appelle valley at Lumsden, is at present, and has been for some days, under water. The greater number of the settlers at Davidson are men wiho went in there only last year. They prepared their land for the crop last season, and this is their first seeding season. Consequently they have to import their seed grain, and now, just at the time when they expected to receive their grain, the railway service has broken down. This, of course, emphasizes the great disadvantage at which any community is placed which is entirely dependent on a single line of railway. That is the situation in which the people of this community find themselves, and I infer that the same conditions are existing in several of the other new settlements along that line of railway. The people in most of the settlements between Lumsden and Saskatoon went into that country. only last season. This is a very serious give us government ownership of railways, this road particularly, because it would then compete successfully with one of these other roads, of which my friend liere (Mr. t>sl&i4 is oneTjnUe great ooudhblders or-directors. We want to build that road and hel]) the



matter. This is a problem which, if it is to be solved at all, must be solved immediately, because, if two or three weeks go by, the seeding season will have gone by. Of course, the solution largely depends on the efforts of the railway company. I am bound to say that, as far as I have been able to ascertain, the Canadian Pacific Railway, under the circumstances existing at Lumsden, have been doing their utmost to overcome the obstacles. It may be suggested, however, that if the seed cannot be got from the south it may be procured, through the efforts of the immigration officials-joined with those of the railway company, north of the South Saskatchewan. It is true that the railway bridge at Saskatoon has been carried away by- the flood, but, as we are aware, there is a ferry, and if seed grain can be procured at Rosthern or others of the farther north settlements where a large amount of grain has been raised in years past, this serious condition of affairs may be remedied.


LIB

Clifford Sifton (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. CLIFFORD SIFTON (Minister of the Interior).

Mr. Speaker, I only received a moment before I came into the House an intimation that the hon. member for West Assiniboia (Mr. Scott) had received the telegram which he has read to us and I have not therefore had any opportunity of consulting with my colleagues in regard to the matter. I am fairly familiar with the circumstances of the country there and I know that that particular portion of the country has been occupied very largely during the last year by new settlers, especially settlers from the United States who have taken up large tracts of land in the neighbourhood of the station of Davidson to which my hon. friend refers. I fancy we will all realize that in conjunction with the efforts we are making to settle that country we ought to take such steps as are necessary to prevent any undue misfortune or event such as the failure to secure seed which would result in the efforts of these settlers being rendered entirely abortive for a whole year. I think I can safely say to my hon. friend, that, although, as I have said, I have not had time to consult my colleagues upon the subject, we will take whatever steps are necessary to see that seed grain is transported and placed within reach of these settlers.

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LIB

Thomas Osborne Davis

Liberal

Mr. T. O. DAVIS (Saskatchewan).

Mr. Speaker, I would like to suggest to the hon. minister that it would perhaps be well to notify the immigration officials and the officials in connection with the lands branch, such as sub-land agents and homestead inspectors, that grain may be got in the northern part of the country in and around Prince Albert. The people who are just going into that country are not seized of the facts and do not know what to do. In that way the difficulty may be overcome. 1 think they can get all the grain they want in and around Prince Albert. I

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LIB

DETENTION OF STEAMER GAUSS AT BREMEN.

CON

Edward Frederick Clarke

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. F. OLARKE (West Toronto).

Mr. Speaker, before the Orders of the Day are called I would like to call the attention of the right hon. Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) to a statement which appears in the morning papers respecting the dilemma or plight in which Captain Bernier finds himself in Bremen. The statement which I find in the ' Citizen ' of this morning is to the following effect :-

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BERNIER'S PLIGHT.


Germans won't let the Captain sail with the ' Gauss.' Montreal, April 28.-A special cable to ' La Presse ' from Bremen says that the German government has refused to allow Captain Bernier to leave the port of Bremen with the steamer ' Gauss ' because $5,000 of the purchase money remains unpaid. Lord Strathcona paid $70,000, holding back $5,000 until the vessel's speed should be tested in Canada. The despatch adds that upon being notified of the situation the Canadian Minister of Marine replied that the government would stick to the conditions of the sale. The German government on the other hand, demands full payment before the vessel leaves port. I would like to ask the right hon. Prime Minister if he has any statement to make to the House and if the information contained in that cablegram is well authenticated. Rt. hon. Sir WILFRID LAURIER (Prime Minister). There was some difference between the Canadian government and German government in respect to the $5,000, but I do not think that for $5,000 the bargain will be lost. I have not heard recently about the matter and therefore I assume the difference has been adjusted.


INQUIRIES FOR RETURNS.

CON

Thomas Chase Casgrain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. CHASE CASGRAIN (Montmorency).

Mr. Speaker, before the Orders of the Day are proceeded with I would like to call the attention of the government to the fact that a return ordered by this House on the very first day that motions were made by private members has not been brought down. I allude to the account of Mr. P. V. Savard. It may become fatiguing but I am not going to be discouraged. The order of the House must be obeyed and I really cannot see why this order has not been obeyed up to this time. I happen to know that the account is made out, that a copy of it is made and why it is not brought down and laid on the table of the House I cannot understand.

Rt. hon. Sir WILFRID LAURIER. My hon. friend (Mr. Casgrain) evidently is better informed that I am myself because he has information that I have not, but if

the copy is made out and the papers are ready certainly they will Joe brought down.

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CON
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

We have been busily engaged for a week and perhaps will be still further.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN (Halifax).

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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. W. S. FIELDING (Minister of Finance).

Touching the matter that the hon. gentleman last referred to I think he alludes to the mortgage in connection with the Canadian Northern subsidy. Directions have been given to copy the papers and I think they will be ready by Monday.

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April 29, 1904