April 21, 1904

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WIDFRID DAURIER.

Sometimes.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   P-E.I.RY.-MURRAY HARBOUR BRANCH.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

X think that with a little practice he will soon have about nine-tenths quotation, and one-tenth his own speech.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   P-E.I.RY.-MURRAY HARBOUR BRANCH.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Perhaps the bad example has affected me.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   P-E.I.RY.-MURRAY HARBOUR BRANCH.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

I must say that I was a little surprised, that after we heard on this side of the House, that the right hon. gentleman was only going to make a few remarks, he came in with a carefully prepared speech, and spoke for nearly, an hour. He surpassed our expectations in that regard. But my rig-lit hon. friend was in very good form, and we were very glad indeed to hear him. My right hon. friend spoke first of great masters of debate, using quotation, and then he went on to state that I had used quotation, and that I had dropped into poetry. Here is the right hon. gentleman's language.

There is this difference, however, between my hon. friend (Mr. R. L. Borden) and these English masters of debate, that he did not quote from the classics, but from his own poetical effusions and perhaps it may be pleasing to him if I should read his verse. Here it is :

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   P-E.I.RY.-MURRAY HARBOUR BRANCH.
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POETRY.


To-morrow and to-morrow and to-morrow Creeps on this petty pace from day to day, And all our yesterdays have seen the route Unknown and .unsurveyed. Well, Sir, my hon. friend assuredly reached a climax -when, in a grave discussion of this character, bristling with figures and intended to be serious, he so far relaxed as to introduce into this debate this effusion, of which in a moment of weakness, flirting with the spirit of the muse, he had become the guilty progenitor. I must not take this compliment. Mr. Chairman. Let me refer my right hon. friend, who seems to be in doubt about this, to act 5, scene 5 of Macbeth-I dare say t:e may have heard of the author of that play.


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Oh, yes. I rm familiar with the quotation.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

Well the right hon. gentleman did not seem to be so familiar with it last night, because lie attributed the quotation to me :

To-morow and to-morrow and to-morrow Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time ;

And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death.

I changed seven words at the end, adapted them, and my right hon. friend gives me credit for the whole. Might I quote the passage further :

Out, out, brief caudle !

Life's but a walking shadow ; a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,

And then is heard no more : it is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Bay to Halifax by the Intercolonial at a good profit. There is no doubt about that. The figures are there a,nd I shall not go over them again. I gave them when I previously spoke on this subject. Therefore, if my right hon. friend is so solicitous, as he says he is, about the maritime ports of Canada, there is just one way to preserve the trade for those ports, and that is to extend the Intercolonial to the shores of Georgian Bay, and by that means absolutely control the traffic which will come from the west and be gathered at the shores of Georgian Bay by whatever railways may be there to reach out for it.

I have not very much more to say about the speech of my right hon. friend last night, because it was very fully and ably answered by my hon. friend from Pictou (Mr. Bell), but there is just one other matter to which I would like to refer, and that is the report of the proceedings at the meeting of the Grand Trunk Railway shareholders. My right hon. friend reproached us for having disclosed to this House a report of the proceedings at that meeting. I would like to know why these proceedings should not t(e disclosed ? Is there anything private about them ? Wer6 they not published in the newspapers? Has not the ' Railway News ' given a report of the meeting, which is, to all intents and purposes, the same as that which I quoted? Why does my right hon. friend say there is anything improper in disclosing these proceedings ? Was there anything secret about that meeting ? Was it intended that there should be anything transacted at it which the people of Canada ought not to know ? I do not understand the suggestion of my right hon. friend in that regard, and lest I should do him an injustice, let me quote his words

My hon. friend quoted from a private report of the meeting of the shareholders of the Grand Trunk Railway Company, but we had not come to the end of this debate before he himself recognized that in so doing he had taken a course which should not be followed in this House or in debate.

I recognized nothing of the kind. I say that we are entitled to have the proceedings of the meeting of the Grand Trunk Railway before this House. Their proceeding's have been published In the public press, and there is no possible reason that I am aware of why they should not be printed and distributed to the country.

But my right hon. friend also referred to another matter. He referred to the mem-* orandmn of Mr. Blair, to which some reference has been made in this House. Let me say a word or two on that point. It seems to me that my right hon. friend is much more sensitive on this subject than he was in times gone by. I recollect very well when he did not seem to be so particular. When it was the object of hon.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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L-C
LIB
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Yes, Sir.

SPROULE. That is all the House 'bs f0r.

HAGGART. Where does the right tij ' Gentleman get his information that t0 1Papers were brought down in answer a motion for correspondence ?

5q

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I do not know how they could have been brought down otherwise.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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CON
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I do not see how they could be brought down otherwise. If they were not brought down in answer to a resolution of the House, will the hon. gentleman tell me how they were brought down ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAGGART.

They were brought down by the Postmaster General off his own bat, without any request at all.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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L-C

Andrew B. Ingram

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. INGRAM.

Published in every Grit paper in the country.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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L-C
LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Here is the

reference :

Correspondence relating to certain mail contract, sessional papers of 1896.

I shall inquire further how they were brought down, but they were brought down as an official correspondence and were taken from the files which were in the department of the Postmaster General. It cannot be anything else. Wherever a motion for papers is made, it is always understood that those papers which are confidential are not to be brought down ; the papeis which are confidential to the minister alone are not put on file. Some of that correspondence is of a confidential nature, and 1 it is of a confidential nature to himself it is not put on file. It may happen that a confidential paper is of a public character and such a document must be put on file in order to have something like an intelligent record. Under such circumstances if an officer of the department places Private papers on the file because they relate to the matter in hand, then such papers become public property. I do not thin^ ]t would be possible to transact public busi ness otherwise, or to carry on the correspondence in any. other way than this. I believe the opposition would be the first to blame the government and to attack it it they did not bring down all the papers on [DOT] record in relation to the question for which papers were moved.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   POETRY.
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April 21, 1904