April 19, 1904

LIB

Lawrence Geoffrey Power (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

This is hardly the question before the House at present.

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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LIB
LIB

Lawrence Geoffrey Power (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr SPEAKER.

My only reason for ap-ltlvtoE the rule is that, if this discussion continues we will he discussing, on a motion to Kurna matter which is the very next Order of the Day.

.Justify ____________________________

see that anv blame can attach to

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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Mr OLIVER.

I accept your ruling, Mr. Speake? as an answer to the hon. gentle-

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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CON

Robert Abercrombie Pringle

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PRINGLE.

I 'would like to ask the hon. gentleman-

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

I must ask, you, Mr. Speaker, to rule this time in my favour.

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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CON
LIB

Lawrence Geoffrey Power (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

The hon. gentleman is not bound to allow another hon. gentleman to put a question. -

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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LIB
?

Mr. IIANOE J.@

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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CON

Thomas Inkerman Thomson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. I. THOMSON (North Grey).

If the hon. gentleman (Mr. Logan) will allow me. I would like to ask him a question, is he opposed to Mr. Chamberlain's policy?

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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LIB

Hance James Logan

Liberal

Mr. LOGAN.

I am opposed to lowering the duties upon British goods coming into Canada, if that lowering will sacrifice Canadian industries. As to my view of Mr. Chamberlain's policy, if the hon. gentleman (Mr. T. I. Thomson) will tell me what Mr. Chamberlain's policy is, I wiil answer his question.

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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CON

Thomas Inkerman Thomson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. I. THOMSON.

The hon. gentleman (Mr. Logan) has just charged us with being opposed to Mr. Chamberlain's policy. If he knows that policy so well, why does he not answer my question?

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LIB

Hance James Logan

Liberal

Mr. LOGAN.

Mr. Speaker, l am exposing the inconsistency of these hon. gentlemen opposite. The hon. member for North Grey (Mr. T. I. Thompson) asks me if I am in favour of Mr. Chamberlain's policy. I am in favour of trying to bind together the interests of the British empire. But if Mr. Chamberlain's policy means the destruction of Canadian industries for the benefit of British industries I am opposed to that policy.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. S. SPROULE (East Grey).

I wish to refer to just one feature of the hon. gentleman's (Mr. Logan's) argument. As representing the woollen industry, he is quite willing that that industry should be left in the hands of the Finance Minister. We find, however, that the Finance Minister gave the House very imperfect information, and practically admitted that he did not know the condition of the woollen industry. The circular to which the hon. Finance Minister referred he presented as an evidence that the woollen industry was doing well and did not require attention at the hands of the government. Does the hon. member for Cumberland (Mr. Logan) object to this House presenting such data to the Finance Minister as wall enable him to intelligently determine what the woollen industry requires ? If that is the case, is he going to object to the man who owns the mills presenting evidence in the House . It he objects to that, he is very unfair to the woollen industry, he is very unfair to this House as well, and unfair to the Finance Minister. The hon. gentleman made another statement, he said he was opposed to lower-in"- the duty on British goods coming into Canada. Yet he has sat there for four years and has supported a reduction of one-third

of the duties on these goods. This is the only instance, so far as my knowledge goes, of any protest on his part. * He has a strange way of showing his objection to the preference.

Motion to adjourn (Mr. Pringle) negatived.

Topic:   THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.
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INQUIRY FOR RETURNS.

CON

Uriah Wilson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. URIAH WILSON (Lennox).

Before the Orders of the Day are called, I would like to ask the government when I may expect the return moved for with reference to the dismissal of the postmaster at Wilton in the riding of Lennox ; also the three returns with reference to immigration. I think it is more than a month since these orders passed the House and we ought to have them down.

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Rt. H@

I will call the attention of the Minister of the Interior and of the Postmaster General to the hon. geutleman's question. I hope he will have these papers soon.

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RAILWAY CONNECTION AT BROCK-YILLE.


(lr,u,;. G,i0;1TAML0R (Leeds)- Before the Oiders ot the Day are called, I wish to draw the attention of the Minister of Railways and Canals and of the Postmaster General to a state of affairs which I think ought to be remedied. I regret these hon. gentlemen are not in their places to-day but I presume the right hon. the Prime Minister will bring the matter to their attention. Coming down from the west by the Grand trunk limited yesterday on our way to Ottawa there were some twenty Senators and members of parliament on board. That train was 20 minutes late, and the conductor telegraphed to Brockville that he had eighteen passengers on board for Ottawa, and that he would be at Brockville at 2.50. The time of the Canadian Pacific Railway to leai e Brockville is 2.40. He made 30 miles fiom our station Gananoque to Brockville in 30 minutes, and arrived at Brockville at -.o0. Just as we were coming in we saw the smoke of the Canadian Pacific Railway train leaving Brockville, we were five minutes too late to make the connection, i have come down four times during the present session at midday, and on three different occasions we arrived too late, and I had to go round by Cornwall, as we had to do yesterday. I think the Minister of Railways and Canals should compel those two railway companies to change their time tables so that there would be connections at Brockville. The limited on the Grand Trunk is due at 2.40 p.m. at Brockville, and the Canadian Pacific Railway is timed to leave there at 2.40. So if the train on the Grand Trunk is ten minutes late the passengers are left behind, some have to remain in Brockville, or to


April 19, 1904