April 19, 1904

FIRST READINGS.


Bill <No 65) respecting certain patents of Louis E. Curtis.-Mr. Wm. Ross (Ontario). Bill (No. 66) respecting the Pacific Northern and Omineca Railway Company.-Mr. Morrison. Bill (No. 67) respecting the Ontario Accident Insurance Company-Mr. A. T. Thompson. Bill (No. 68) respecting the Hudson's Bay and Northwest Railway Company.-Mr. Oliver. Bill (No. 69) to incorporate the Monarch Life Assurance Company-Mr. Osier.


PERSONAL EXPLANATION.

CON

R. L. BORDEN.


The Chief, ' Hansard ' Staff. Office of Official Reporters of Debates, House of Commons, Ottawa, April 18, 1904. Dear Mr. Borden,-In reply to your note of to-day, asking whether, in your speech of the 5th April, you used the word ' published,' as reported, I beg to say that I find, on inquiry, that you did not use that word, but that the word you did use was ' prepared.' The use of the word ' published ' was an error of this office, which occurred in the course of transcription. Regretting, on behalf of the staff, the inconvenience this error has occasioned you, I remain, Very respectfully,


ALBERT HORTON,


Chief Reporter. R. L. Borden. Esq., M.P., House of Commons.


INQUIRY FOR RETURN.


Mr T CHASE CASGRAIN (Montmorency) I would like to draw my right hon. 'riend's attention to the promise ^ made on .he 7tli of April last to bring down the Ordei



in Council passed in virtue of the Act 3 Edward VII., chapter 53, transferring the management, charge and direction of eer tain public works to the Department of Marine and Fisheries. My right lion, friend said then that he would lay a copy of the Order in Council on the table. I would cal! his attention to the fact that on the 19th of March what purports to be a copy of this Order in Council was published in ' Le Canada ' at Montreal, and consequently it seems to me we ought to have it in the House. I would call the attention of my hon. friend the Minister of Marine and Fisheries (Mr Prefontaine) to the fact that he has not yet laid on the table the account of Mr. P. V. Savard. I do not think I am being fairly treated in this matter. The order of the House was given on the first members' day of this session directing that this account should be laid on the table of the House. I do not Want to have a debate on it to-day, but probably some other occasion will present itself. .


?

Right Hon. S@

I think I can produce that Order in Council to-morrow.

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THE TARIFF-WOOLLEN AND COTTON DUTIES.

CON

Robert Abercrombie Pringle

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROBERT A. PRINGLE (Cornwall and Stormont).

tariff so tliat they can give to their working men the same wages as are given in the United States of America. Now, Sir. I referred yesterday to the campaign sheets that have been circulated all through the western country with the frank of the Minister of the Interior. I have another one of them here, and it says :

Never were manufacturers so busy.

When I call the attention of the House to this fact, that the woollen industry of this country is depressed that the woollen mills of this country are being closed down, I am told by the Minister of Finance that this is not true, that he holds in his possession a letter to the effect that these mills are not closing down. I ask the Minister of Finance to put that letter on the table. Let us see that letter-because I am informed there is no such letter, that the only letter which has been sent out to the trade in this country is a ietttr simply to the effect that they are still taking orders.

That all orders accepted by us will as heretofore be filled on the terms and at the date agreed upon without fail.

Now, Sir, I referred yesterday to the different statements made by the ministers of this government. We have the Minister of the Interior going into the wfest advocating a low tariff, we have the Minister of Marine and Fisheries going into the manufacturing centres and advocating a higher tariff. We have had an accession to the cabinet lately, we have had the Hon. Charles S. Hyman, of London. I hope that that hon. gentlemen will stand no for the policy of Canada for the Canadians. I wish to quote some language of lu's as reported in the Toronto ' Globe,' and I want to know what it means, if it does not mean more protection. I am free to admit that I don't care where the protection comes from, whether it comes from the Liberals or whether it comes from Conservatives. What I do want to 'see is the workingmen of this country protected. I do not want to see what has occurred in my town last year, numbers of these men who had gathered together a little money, who had comfortable homes, and they have been put out of employment and compelled to leave the town because of the closing of the woollen mill. They were trained specially as operatives of a woollen mill, and they not only had to leave the town, but they had to go to the United States of America. I want to see these people kept in our own country, and we can keep them here if we adopt a proper policy in this country. Now let ns see what the hon. member for London (Hon. Mr. Hyman) said :

The Grand Trunk Pacific, in giving cheap transportation in the west, would go a long way towards making a protective tariff popular. Mr

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CON
CON

Robert Abercrombie Pringle

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PRINGLE.

The hon. gentleman speaks of a circular. Will he put it on the table ?

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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

I will be delighted to place a copy of it on the table. I have not a copy of the document in my pocket at this moment. If my hon. friend had given notice that he intended to ask for it I would have produced it. He, no doubt, a few moments before I entered the House said that he intended to raise the question. But my hon. friend admits the document to have been sent out because he asks : Where are the words in the circular stating that they are not closing ? I do not remember those words, but the essence of that circular is that they were inviting orders and if they were closing their mills how could they invite orders ? I say that the company has issued a circular referring to the recent reports, to prevent misunderstanding, stating that they desire to notify their customers that they are still doing business and that they are inviting orders. That is the substance of the circular sent to their customers a copy of which passed under my hand. I think I can obtain the copy again. It has already been published in the newspapers _ within the last day or two if I am not mistaken. I think I saw a copy of it in one of the Toronto papers. At all events, I gave the statement, not on the authority of a private letter, but on the authority of a circular issued by the company stating that they were still doing business and inviting orders. What effect that may have upon the general question of the woollen trade or the tariff generally I do not propose to discuss to-dtiy. But, I have stated the substance of the circular which is a public letter. I think I can give the hon. gentleman the document itself.

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CON

William Rees Brock

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. R. BROCK (Centre Toronto).

Mr. leaker, as being directly interested m this atter that is now before the House P 1 '

ips I may be permitted to say a ww_ explanation. The Canadian Woollen ills Company have four mills, lvo or iese mills were closed six months ago and ve remained closed ever since because 1Cv had no orders. We endeavoured to get line of the operatives of those nulls to .me to our western mills. We ^ leceed in getting one of them. We couia it under the present tariff, pay sufficient [DOT]'i'o-oc, and the great bulk of them are now vint in the United States. We have one

large mill at Waterloo and one at Hespeler. These mills are still running but we are preparing to close them. We issued the circular that is spoken of, but we did not say in this circular that these mills were closed. We did not say they were going to continue open. We stated that we were prepared to fill such orders as the authorities at the mill would receive. We took care not to accept any orders that would bind us beyond the 12th of May when these mills are to be sold, but in the meantime we thought we would do what the government declines to do-we would endeavour to protect our operatives even at a loss to ourselves until the change was made believing that the change would be made more to our advantage by having these mills maintained as going concerns. If we chose to accept orders these orders would be transferred to any company buying out our mills and they would certainly be more valuable with orders than without orders.

The idea I got from the remarks of the Finance Minister was, that he endeavoured to make some little capital for his side, by stating that these mills were going ; that they were not depressed ; that they were not without orders. Now, Sir, I can say positively, and I think it is well that it should be known, that we have run that concern for .four years at a loss of $50,000 per year ; that that loss commenced when the preference commenced and gradually increased as the preference increased; that as the preference increased our orders from this country became smaller, and those of us who are engaged as merchants in this country sent larger orders to Yorkshire, because we found that the mills in this country were not able to compete under existing circumstances and under the existing) tariff with the great mills of Yorkshire and Germany. That is all I require to say at present. As the Minister of Finance has said, I hope that he will have another opportunity of discussing this matter.

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CON

Robert Abercrombie Pringle

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PRINGLE.

Before the motion is put Mr. Speaker, I just wish to say, that I am very glad that the Finance Minister has admitted that the circular which he received did not contain the language which he quoted yesterday.

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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

I did not profess to quote any words ; I gave the substance.

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April 19, 1904