April 18, 1904


SS. * LAKE CHAMPLAIN.' r' E. D. SMITH-by Mr. Clarke-asked : Mitjm answer to question of April 6th, the Charnar.°f Agriculture said: 'The ss. 'Lake v6nti]ajjin ' kad the ordinary system of cowl vei Ike government examined these cowl «,.i;tors, and found them in nroner order and V°yagecient size' on this boat on each outward ' When perishable cargo was aboard ? cu]t®k- SYDNEY FISHER (Minister of Agri-Harjjfw- One of the inspectors for the Detachof Agriculture has reported on from v-Jtward voyage of this steamship, both S6ason port of Montreal during the past St. j i °I navigation and from the port of ea i ' N.B., during the winter season, and ?>s fnii rePort the ventilation is described decks : No. 1-2 in-takes, 2 out-V 4 ' No. 2-2 in-takes ; No. 3-2 in-takes ; fhives . 2 in-takes ; No. 5-2 in-takes, 2 out-Ori0' No. 6-2 out-takes. , lloji' : No. 1-2 in-takes, 2 out-takes. % p o .No- 1-2 in-takes, 2 out-takes : L' ~ in-takes ; No. 3-2 in-takes ; No. "o. r 'J^kes ; No. 5-2 in-takes, 2 out-takes ; i -the v 0l]t'takes. i ihchi en.tilators in the 'tween decks were R inPi-,es in diameter, and those in the holds , <rv s: 11 iuL, inspector is instructed to mention of n3)ort the fact of a ventilator being ?ilthiur.*-61' 'I he so finds it when making his ot ''«on. The reports do not state that and found them in proper order and *411/ the 'tv AY ventilators were out of order.


CATTLE-GUARD COMMISSION.


^LRNnox asked : cit,the total cost of the Railway Cattle- ;mmissi°a* (,\va * R. EMMERSON (Minister of Rail-atWi * 5JanaIs0- The total cost of the b., ai'o Commission was $6,828,68. wing electric power to united ltl. _ STATES. 61. asked : a*'^ application been made to the gov-in P issi'on t i£ so> when and by whom, for ^ahada r° obtain electric power generated [DOT] fo convey it to the United States ? 2. If such application has been made, what action has the government taken, or what decision has the government come to, in respect to the matter ?


?

Rt. H@

No record can be found of any such application.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   CATTLE-GUARD COMMISSION.
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ALBERTON STATION AND ENTRANCE.

L-C

Mr. HACKETT asked :

Liberal-Conservative

1. What report, if any, has the government received relative to the survey and appropriation of a new entrance by rail into the town of Alberton, Prince county, Prince Edward Island, and the avoidance of the ' Y ' nuisance, under which the place has long suffered ?

2. Before the new station is commenced at Alberton, will this nuisance be removed by selecting a proper line of entrance ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ALBERTON STATION AND ENTRANCE.
Permalink
LIB

Hon. H. R. EMMERSON (Minister of Railways and Canals) : (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

1. The department has received a report from the General Manager, which does not favour the proposed change.

2. The matter is under consideration as to what shall be done.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   ALBERTON STATION AND ENTRANCE.
Permalink

IMPERIAL SERVICE COMMISSIONS-CANADIAN MILITIA.

L-C

Mr. SAM. HUGHES asked:

Liberal-Conservative

1. How many commissions in the imperial service of the British empire are allotted to officers from the Canadian militia annually ?

2. Are these commissions over and above those given graduates of the Royal Military College, of Kingston ?

3. What are the conditions under which the six commissions are supposed to be granted ?

i. What examinations are to be passed ? If this information is too detailed for a question, will the government have it laid upon the Table of the House ?

5. For the non-military examination, that is, for the literary examination, is a standing in one or the other of Canada's universities accepted in lieu thereof ? If so, what is the standing required ?

6. How many Canadian militia officers have received such commissions annually since 1899, inclusive ?

7. Are special commissions in the West African service, or other similar service, given to Canadian officers besides ?

8. If so, what are conditions required for such service ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   IMPERIAL SERVICE COMMISSIONS-CANADIAN MILITIA.
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LIB

Sir FREDERICK W. BORDEN (Minister of Militia and Defence) : (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal

1. Six.

2. Yes.

3. An officer of the colonial military forces who is a candidate for a commission in the British army will be required-

(a) . To be unmarried, and to be between the ages of 18 and 25 on the 1st January of the year in which he is allowed to present himself for the examination in military subjects.

(b) . To have served as an officer in the local military force of the colony from which he is nominated, and to have attend-

.1359

ed two annual trainings, each training to be in a distinct year, or have seen active service in the field.

The application should be accompanied by-

(a) . An extract from the register of the candidate's birth ; or, in default, a certi-eate of his baptism or other documentary evidence, accompanied by a declaration made by one of his parents or guardians before a magistrate, giving his exact age.

(b) . A certificate of having served the required number of annual trainings (each training in a distinct year).

(c) . A certificate from the governor that he is satisfied that the candidate is actually a colonist, that he is of good moral character, and, in all other respects, a fit and proper person to hold a commission in His Majesty's army.

(d) . A certificate that the candidate has passed the prescribed literary examination, or that he has passed an equivalent examination.

4. A literary examination ; an examination in military subjects ; a medical examination.

Further details as regards the different subjects of the literary and military examinations in which a candidate will be examined can be furnished on application to the department. Only one copy of regula-tions*available.

5. Yes, provided the candidate has passed the examination specified below at any of the following universities :-

Oxford-The ' First Public Examination.' Cambridge-One of the parts of the ' General Examination,' or Part I. of any ' Tripos Examination.'

Dublin-The ' Final Examination of the Senior Freshman Year,' or the ' Final Examination of thb School of Engineering.' Durham-The ' First Year's Examinations.'

. London-The Intermediate Examinations in Arts, Law, Science or Medicine.

Scotch Universities-The ' Examination of Candidates for the Army.'

The Royal University, Ireland-' The Second University Examination in Arts, or the Second Professional Examination in Engineering.'

Victoria University, Manchester-The Intermediate Examination.

. Or if he has passed some other test which is accepted by the university as exempting him from the above examinations. A certificate that the examination is accepted by the authorities concerned must be produced.

An equivalent examination at the University of Malta, or one of the chartered colonial universities will likely be accepted as a sufficient ground for exemption.

A candidate is also exempted from the literary examination, except in geometrical drawing, if he can produce a certificate from a chartered university that he has-

(a) . Taken his degree in Arts or Science; or

(b) . Passed the examinations for the degree of B.A. or M.A. at one of the following

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   IMPERIAL SERVICE COMMISSIONS-CANADIAN MILITIA.
Permalink
LIB

Frederick William Borden (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Liberal

Sir F. W. BORDEN.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   IMPERIAL SERVICE COMMISSIONS-CANADIAN MILITIA.
Permalink

STE. FLORE VOTERS' 1,1ST-


Mr. CASGRAIN-by Mr. Clarke-asked [DOT] „ aCtO\, j.. urn me depositary or tne fot 1 t for the purposes of provincial elections,, t <>l parish of Ste. Flore, in the electoral cu* t0 to® Three Rivers and St. Maurice, f°rw: Jlf Clerk of the Crown in Chancery, as „r„ c0pf t U 771__ i ~ ... . .... til tl u w <7 It* ![DOT] Did the depositary of the list of e* r 0e 4.1, _____ * . . . i _ „+5onS. 1 j. o* 6 6 *. u, liib uown m unancery, copJ . the Franchise Act of 1898, section 10. s*>_the changes or modifications made to , electoral list by a judgment rendered jjoi_Rivers, on the 18th January, 1904, W 1 Judge Desmarais, erasing eighty-se* ,from that list ? '„sitaff X2. On what date did the said deP°^r nio® the said list forward the said change Cb®w fleations to the Clerk of the Crown eery ? aU*IJ51


?

Right Hon. S@

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   STE. FLORE VOTERS' 1,1ST-
Permalink

RAILWAY FARES OF AGRICULT

L-C

Edward Hackett

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HACKETT asked :

t0

1. Is the intention of the f=0V,eI'i1Jure, duce railway rates to a nominal 6 aeieg tj,o mit of free passes, for agricult wi(j:n of over public railways, in accord nVeOti

resolution passed at the annual c the Prince Edward Island farnte [DOT]

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   RAILWAY FARES OF AGRICULT
Sub-subtopic:   DELEGATES.
Permalink

APKIL 18, 1904 1361


'What 'Blegat " *S t^le l°west existant rate paid by faref ,e? ^tending such conventions, and the Public [DOT] en formally engaged in promoting the traaie ,lnterests, and thus increasing railway t'6ieS1l0l\I<5 not those gentlemen, giving their t0|llHtv i hrains to the advancement of the [DOT], he provided with free transportation ? H- R. RMMERSON (Minister of thidp, Vs an<l Canals). I cannot very well to whether this question relates generally or merely to the gov-th6f]ent railway. I may say further that t>f !mtPuty minister informs me that no trace the a , Sl1cl1 resolution as that referred to in Uientquestion can be found in the departed [DOT] The second question relates to spe-(Ja'jtes on railways generally throughout l)artm' That information is not in the defree The third question involves the 'Vaytr^nsportation on the government rail-btai °t all those who devote their time and Oil: to the advancement of the country. Coi),,„0"*nS stock might not be sufficient to '6y all of these. 0,rA.Nd n, trunk pacific railway. °use sm e resumed adjourned debate on the pro-?D«aW°tioil o£ Sir Wilfrid Laurier, ' That Mr. l° go in, 1,ow leave the Chair, for the House s°hition 0 c°mmittee to consider a certain re-JSfeej, e°ncerning the ratification of the 6 Gra between His Majesty the King and n Trunk Pacific Railway Company, a sea a 8th of March, 1904 ' ; and the pro-'tt,'6iUlmInen'iment of Mr. Borden (Halifax) in j. ment thereto. }tr. '^ILLIAM J. ROCHE (Marquette). ^°Usef ,ker, the Bill which passed this tohtiper?r the construction of another trans-Mth highway, which was heralded gentlemen ®Pp08it C1 great, acclaim by hon. gi e' as being the very acme of per-o J a Bill that could scarcely be im ^'o\ n ?f vwuP°n, beneficial alike from the point b 0f _____j._____j „___ h t°-(iri v°f B*e country and of the company, U0hspl o aeing subjected to criticism in this si,,™0nS its own friends. We have ipf 1Tloned to parliament, so we have B'hnk j?r?e(i by the president of the Grand aiIway- f°r the express purpose of 6lpg 8 that contract, th*e amendments all L,8 ft,Ul iculated to confer greater advanta-it>. hot greater benefits on that corporation, tp reats0llf °t them to further protect the of] °f Canada. When the opposition J ast session that it was the intention th liattieriferni.nent to force that Bill through ? lptrofl without consulting the country, hita^i ce<^ a series of resolutions which IMm ests- to turther safeguard Canadian of ch ^y.' , tn view of the vast expenditure Of ?ahadaS incurred by the Dominion tv *ts ie ,a'. the opposition in the performance tip Conf,,l5?te duties, endeavoured to make ho e bn a<?^ as Perfect as possible and to possible loophole that might sfl,' det).i,aavantage of by tlie company to htloj. , n't of the country. These rehowever with, I think, but two exceptions were rejected by the government and its followers on <the ground that they were not in the contract, that the company would not accept them and that parliament had either to accept or reject the contract as a whole. The hon. Minister of Justice (Mr. Fitzpatrick) and the hon. Minister of the Interior (Mr. Sifton) in particular waxed indignant at the mere suggestion that this corporation might hot keep faith with the Canadian people. Could we imagine a body of men, said the Minister of the Interior, a body of reputable citizens standing so high in the financial world as these gentlemen who were seeking incorporation under this charter, to have so little regard for their standing and their integrity as to break faith with the parliament of Canada, and go back upon their solemn contract ? The idea in his opinion was preposterous and hut the phantom production of the imagination of the members of the opposition. But, Sir, notwithstanding this great faith on the part of the hon. Minister of the Interior (Mr. Sifton) scarcely had the ink dried on the contract, not a bit of work had been done in pursuance of it, before we saw these reputable gentlemen going back on their contract and putting up not the deposit in cash or government securities required by the contract, but a deposit of Grand Trunk Railway bonds and this only after the time limit had expired. Thus we find these gentlemen right at the outset breaking their solemn contract and breaking it, not for the reason assigned by the Prime Minister that there was a stringency in the money market, for Mr. Hays very definitely stated that they could have had plenty of money, but merely as a matter of convenience to the company. So we In the opposition find ourselves justified in the position we took last year when we wanted to tie these gentlemen down to black and white, taking nothing for granted, no matter how upright they might be. When we find how lightly they have treated their written contract entered into with all the solemnity spoken of by the hon. gentlemen opposite, we feel perfectly justified in the position we took. The right hon. the Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) in dealing with this matter, this session profited by the criticisms administered to his speech of last year, avoided those mock heroics and that hysterical condition that played such havoc with his mental equilibrium last year. The mountains of information which he was supposed to lay before the House last year to furnish reasons for the construction of this line were found on careful perusal to contain very little practical information. It is true that this has been supplemented by the right hon. the Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) lliis session by a quotation from a report made by a Jesuit missionary 200 years ago, wherein he had said that on a certain day in June, roses were in bloom and that they had no'night in that country. That was surely most modern Information on the



strength of which to build a railway, and when the right hon. gentleman (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) has to employ such an argument to bolster up his opinion he can hardly continue to call himself a practical man. It is passing strange, Mr. Speaker, to observe the treatment that has been accorded by the right hon. the Prime Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) to the various gentlemen who have held the portfolio of Railways and Canals in this government. The gentleman who occupied that position from 1896 to 1903, Mr. Blair, the only practical man in Canada so far as railways are concerned, the gentleman who knew more about railways than all the other members of the cabinet put together, the gentleman to whom the Prime Minister gives a certificate of character to-day as being the best railway expert in the Dominion of Canada- his information was lightly treated, and he himself was so cavalierly treated, that he was not even invited in when the negotiations that led up to this contract were undertaken. It is true that that gentleman was not slow in expressing his opinion of this contract when it was up for consideration last session. He denounced it in no measured language claimed that it was a mere wilful waste of public money, utterly unjustifiable, without a single redeeming; feature. After hearing that expression of opinion, after hearing that strong condemnation of this railway scheme, the Prime Minister valued that opinion so highly that be immediately said, in effect : Mr. Blair, your head is level, you are just the man I have been looking for. I have looked over Canada from one end to the other to find the most competent authority on railways, to find the very best railway expert. After hearing your expression of opinion and valuing it as highly as I do, I ask you to come up higher, to accept one of the best and most important railway positions in the Dominion of Canada, carrying with it emoluments, no small matter in itself, of §10,000 per annum. It is true that if your view were carried into effect it would save the country many millions of dollars, but inasmuch as your hands would be tied so far as this particular scheme is concerned and inasmuch as your silence would be secured for the next ten years, I think this would be a splendid move, looked at from a party standpoint, and would get a dangerous opponent out of our way. Please overlook those unkind criticisms that your erst-while Liberal friends have made on your conduct, those gentlemen who, when you were Minister of Railways and Canals, were servile supporters of every questionable scheme that has been put up by this government since 1896, lauded you as being one of the best Ministers of Railways and Canals Canada was ever blessed with ; but who, no sooner had you turned your guns upon this railway scheme of mine, immediately began to speak of you in violent language, to impute the worst of motives to you, stating that


CON

April 18, 1904