March 14, 1904

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

It never was applied for yet.

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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Mr. R.@

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

will look at the Montreal 'Star ' any day for the last twelve months or so you will see at the head of the editorial page a standing pronunciamento :

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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TO THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA.


Give the manufacturers, workingmen, and farmers of Canada the same kind of tariff as that which has made the United States the home of the most prosperous manufacturers, workingmen and farmers in the world. ' The home of the most prosperous manufacturers, the working men hnd farmers of the world.' I say the home of factions, combines and anarchists.


TO THE MANUFACTURERS OF CANADA.


Force the government to give you as good a tariff as that which has made the American manufacturers rich. When you get this tariff, pay your Canadian workmen American wages. I pity the poor Canadian workmen if they get American wages instead of good Canadian wages.


TO THE WORKINGMEN OF CANADA.


Take a leaf out of the book of the American workingman. Help your employers to obtain for themselves and for you a Canada-for-Canadians tariff. Why, Sir, is it at this moment, when the people and the government of the United States are endeavouring to free themselves from the shackles which have been coiled around them by the manufacturers, the trusts, the combines, which are the direct creation of the tariff that we are called upon-to be so foolish and so criminal as to put our limbs into these shackles ? Is it at a time when manufacturers in the United States are closing their mills right and left that we are to adopt the policy which has brought about the distress that to-day exists in that country ? Is it at a time when American workmen have their wages decreased by ten, twenty or even forty per cent that Canadian workmen are asked to be so unmindful, so ignorant of their own interests as to adopt the American tariff ? No, Sir. For my part, much as I admire the United States-and I have never had any hesitation in declaring that I have the greatest admiration for that great people, for they are a great people, and no one can read their history without admiration of the qualities that they have displayed-great as is my admiration for the United States, yet, if we are to seek an example, it is not to the United States that I would look for it. We can do better. I do not want to seek my examples anywhere than in this land of Canada. We have better institutions and a better fiscal policy than theirs. We have a fiscal policy of moderation. Their fiscal policy is a policy of exaggeration. It has brought that country, I will not say to the verge of civil war. But tonday what do you find in the United States ? You find a condition which is not healthy, a condition different from that


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

which you find in Canada. At the top of the United States social system you find the wealthy manufacturers, the monopolists, and combinesters who have made the coun-' try simply a tribute payer to their organizations. And what do you find at the bottom ? Almost anarchy, strikes almost in permanence; you find labour institutions going the length of declaring a penalty against the members of their institutions who become members of the militia, thus refusing the very first duty that the citizen owes to his country. This is the condition which exists in the United States and this is the example which hon. gentlemen on the other side tell us we should follow. Far distant be the day when we shall seek an example of the United States to guide ns in fiscal or in other matters. No, Sir, we will continue as we have commenced ; we will remain simply ourselves ; and, to use a good Canadian phrase, we will paddle our own canoe. We will continue the course we have advocated in the past; we will maintain ourselves as we have commenced ; we will continue the policy of common sense, calmness and moderation which has already done so much for the Canadian people, for their fair name and for their general prosperity.

Topic:   TO THE WORKINGMEN OF CANADA.
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IND
LIB
IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN.

Yes, I have made an estimate of the cost, and I may tell my hon. friend that if the government had gone to the Grand Trunk people in London and said: We will assume your liabilities and make some small provision for the common stock, they could have got that road. Let me tell the hon. gentleman that it is not the Grand Trunk shareholders who pay for the maintenance of this road but the people in Canada who use the road. They have paid the debt and are paying the debt and should control the road and use it towards the solution of the transportation problem. _ My right hon. friend deprecated this action of tlie present chairman of the Railway Commission in leaving his government on that issue. H011. Mr. Blair believed or was coming to the belief that national ownership was the real solution of the question. He took that view in this House and was prepared, I believe, to take over the Canada Atlantic Railway for the same purpose, and instead of making a mistake I say tlmt he brought forward a policy which u-ouhl bine done a great deal for the mimedi.

provement of the transportation farflit es or

this country. He made no mistake, but oil the contrary proposed something that was in

the interests of all the people. The characteristic of all the legislation and discussion before the world to-day is that it is moving on the lines of national ownership. Municipal ownership has done everything for the cities of Great Britain and the principle is spreading, in European countries they derive great benefits from the state operation of railways. In the United States they think they can secure a great measure of relief from the high charges of the railways if the railways were owned by the country. It may he impossible for, them to accomplish that end now but it would be easy for us to take over the Grand Trunk Railway, to combine it with the Intercolonial and to make a national system not only giving the people reduced freights but making a road which would be a power in reducing the charges of the Canadian Pacific Railway of which the people in the west complain. That is practical politics, earnest politics, an endeavour to solve the transportation problem, and Hon. Mr. Blair was moving along that line but lie got no credit for it and to-day is told that he made the mistake of his life. The people of Ontario and Quebec to-day are looking for lower passenger rates. Is there any way to get them other than to take over the railways ?. If the Grand Trunk be taken over and a passenger rate of 2 cents a mile be given on it, we would have every road in this country giving a 2 cents a mile rate. This would be going a long way in solving the transportation problem and in a moderate way it would secure the opening up of the back country of Canada I think we should have a two cent rate and that it will come. Government ownership to my mind is the only way to obtain relief and I believe it is on lines of that kind that the people of Canada are looking for improvement. They want to have something done and this is the only way to bring relief to the farmer, to the man who raises stock. _

We have great stock industries all over this country, in Quebec and Ontario,, and the people engaged in these industries wish to get their cattle to market without having to submit to exorbitant rates and there is no way of accomplishing that result except by adopting the principle of government ownership and in that way giving the relief that these people require. The farmers are meeting all over the country asking for railway relief. They are meeting all over the Northwest Territories, and the constant cry is that they want a reduction in transportation rates. We are told in the address that in some way the Bill now before parliament will aid them because it will help to move the grain of the west. It may do so in a very modified form, but the real solution has not been arrived at. it will not come from tills measure and it is not likely to come from any measure introduced by lion, gentlemen opposite. We have to na-

Topic:   TO THE WORKINGMEN OF CANADA.
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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN.

everything they want. There is no legislature in this country to-day doing anything for the people, but every one of them is turning handsprings to distribute the resources of the country among the great corporations. That has got to come to an end. Perhaps the word ' Conservative ' and the word ' Liberal ' have passed out of usefulness in this country. Perhaps the day has come for a true national party- a party that believes in Canada,' in the people, in the nation, and is prepared to do for the nation instead of doing for the corporations. If we are to take on true national greatness in this country, if we are to appreciate ourselves, we must use the resources of the country and the money of the people directly for the good of the people themselves, and not for making rich men and great corporations, who grind down the people. The day has arrived for bringing all that to an end, as you will find if you go about the country. The opposition in this House has declared in favour of public ownership in connection with the Intercolonial and its extension, and the people of the Northwest recognize that there is no solution of the transportation question except on national principles and they are all nationalists in that sense. The phrase is growing, and those who believe in it are increasing in numbers ; and I believe to-day, as I have believed for some years, that the only way to solve these problems and to grant relief to the people is to move on national lines. Let us have a national tariff, let us have a national system of transportation, let us maintain the integrity of Canada on this North American continent. National propositions such as these will command the support of the Canadian people. It is on these lines that I have been appealing in my own constituency and my own province, and the people respond ; and it is the men in this House who approach public questions on these lines who will be sent back here by the people. They cannot go on the old cries, because the people will not have them. The people are at last alive to the fact that so far the governments and the parties of this country have been working for the corporations, have been throwing away the resources of the country and have been doing nothing for the people directly. This, I trust, is coming to an end. I hope we can see the beginning of a great national movement on this side of the House. If the opposition start to educate the people on these lines, and oppose them to the lines proposed by hon. gentlemen opposite, the day of real relief and improvement will soon come for the people. I hope that day is at hand; and whether the election comes this year or next year, hon. gentlemen will find that it is only on these great national lines that they will com-Mr. MACLEAN.

mand the support of the people of Canada.

Topic:   TO THE WORKINGMEN OF CANADA.
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CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. HAGGART.

At this late hour, with the consent of my right hon. friend, I would move the adjournment of the debate.

Topic:   TO THE WORKINGMEN OF CANADA.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I have no objection, but I hope we will be able to keep later hours in the future. I would move in amendment that the following words be added to the motion :

That the order for the consideration of the motion for an address to be presented to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to Ms Speech, have precedence over all other business, except the introduction of Bills, until disposed of.

Topic:   TO THE WORKINGMEN OF CANADA.
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Amendment agreed to. Motion (Hon. Mr. Haggart) agreed to, and debate adjourned.


ADJOURNMENT-GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILROAD SURVEYS.


Sir WILFRID LAURIER moved the adjournment of the House.


CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

Topic:   ADJOURNMENT-GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILROAD SURVEYS.
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March 14, 1904