March 14, 1904


, The House proceeded to the consideration of His Excellency's speech at the opening of the session.


LIB

George Davidson Grant

Liberal

Mr. G. D. GRANT (North Ontario).

year 1903 the farmers of this country exported of their own produce $114,000,000 worth, there being an increase of $18,000,000 over the previous year's export and an increase of $64,000,000 over the export of 1896. I ^need not go into the different articles. I need not quote the returns of the different products, but when we remember that in 1903 our farmers and cheese men sold of cheese $24,000,000 worth, of butter $7,000,000 worth, of hams and bacon $16,000,000 worth, of wheat $24,000,0(10 worth, and of cattle $11,000,000 worth, it will convey to us some faint idea of the growing importance of the industry of agriculture and furthermore of the splendid strides it has been making during the past few years in Canada. Being myself a solicitor, practising in a small way in a country town, I have some practical knowledge of What the farmers, at least of my own province, are doing. I can say from my experience and knowledge of the state of affairs in the province of Ontario at least, and I doubt not but what it is true of the other provinces, that the farmers are paying off their mortgage indebtedness and paying it off very rapidly. Mr. Speaker, if a farmer comes into a solicitor's office to borrow money to-day it is not because he is going behind. It is because he wants to buy the fifty acres next to him or the 100 acres across the road, and the man who has sold the fifty or 100 acres to him is not going away to Dakota disgusted and disgruntled, but very likely he is retiring with a competence to live in comfort in the adjoining town, or if a young man. is going to our Northwest there to join in making a home amongst the many hundreds and thousands who are settled in that fertile country. Why do I quote these figures ? It is not for the purpose, let me assure you, Mr. Speaker, of recording any party advantage, or of building an argument thereon-and I quite confess an indisputable argument might easily be built thereon for the retention of the present government and its policy-but for the purpose of strengthening and confirming, if it were necessary, the conviction bf every one, that it is a good thing to be a citizen of Canada in this fair day of hope and progress.

Sir. let me refer to our great western country. The speech from the Throne would have been singularly lacking had it not spoken of the wonderful growth which Western Canada has experienced. I hesitate to quote figures ; I hesitate to set an array of statistics before the House on such an occasion ; but I cannot refrain from giving a few figures which bear on the development of the West. When I state, that the immigration to Canada last year (1903) comprised 128,000 souls, it will be apparent at a glance that there has been a great influx of settlement, and I may add that two-thirds of these new comers were English speaking citizens. These figures show an increase over the figures of the previous year of 44,000,

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LIB

George Davidson Grant

Liberal

Mr. GRANT.

or more than fifty per cent, and they represent eight times the number who came to Canada in the year 1896. Why, Sir, last year, from the United States alone, 47,000 immigrants came to settle in Canada, and so far as we know these belong to the most desirable class that we could possibly attract to our country. And how has this happened ? Has the Canadian west not been there from time immemorial; have these fertile prairies not been there ever since there has been a Canada ; ever since there has been a government of Canada ! How is it that only of late years has that long dormant land awakened up to settlement ! I trust. Sir, that I am not going beyond the reasonable bounds of courtesy and etiquette to be observed on such an occasion when I say that the credit of that splendid development and growth is due largely to the vigorous policy and generous treatment which the Department of the Interior has meted out to that western country. Why, for the fiscal year 1903, we find that there were 31,383 homestead entries taken out in that western land, being more than double the entries of the year previous and eighteen-fold greater than the entries for the year 1895-6. And, Sir, I have made inquiry and I find that for the first eight months of this year there have been over 16,000 entries, and the great rush which is confidently expected this spring, will no doubt insure that the figures for the current year will greatly outstrip those for the year I have just mentioned. Is it not reassuring to remember that during the year last past, there was made available and open for settlement, in fact disposed of for settlement in our great West, nine and a quarter millions of acres ? In this is included of course the land sold by the colonization companies, the railway companies having land grants, the Hudson's Bay Company, and our own Department of the Interior. The Department of the Interior alone disposed of for settlement over 5,000,000 acres of land last year. This was an increase over the year 1896 of fifty-fold and more. Now, Sir, when we remember that the total yield of wheat in that western country was between 60,000,000 and 70,000,000 bushels last year, we perhaps can form some idea of what a fabulously rich asset we have in Manitoba and the Territories. I might multiply figures and quote statistics further, but I shall have mercy upon the House, and I shall content myself with saying, that the growth and the expansion recorded by our great west during the past three or four years, is unparalleled by any country in the history of the world. There is this to be said : that both Manitoba and the Northwest Territories are, as time goes on, getting more independent; I mean in a financial way, and nowadays, it would take more than one bad harvest to seriously hamper any of the western provinces. Such, Sir, is the story of our west, and I have but touch-

of Canada have been those most free of interruption by snow and storm. The main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, running through the northern part of the province of Ontario, has been very slight^ impeded ; and I am told on very good authority that the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway, probably the most northerly one in Canada, running for a distance of about 200 miles from Quebec to Roberval, has run every train, both freight and passenger, on schedule time throughout the whole of the year. And that railway, I believe, runs through a country very similar to that which will be traversed by the eastern division of the Grand Trunk Railway. Therefore we may dismiss that bogey from our minds.

The government is to be commended, in my humble -opinion, for holding intact the main features of the contract of last year. The variations of the contract are not in any way material, and do not in any manner tend to jeopardize the successful issue of the project. As these modifications and alterations have been published in full, and are on the desk of every hon. member, I shall not weary the House by going into them in detail. Perhaps the most important amendment is that which relates to the guarantee of the bonds of the mountain section. By the original contract the government agreed to guarantee the bonds of that section to the extent of $30,000 a mile. Under the amended agreement the guarantee will be for three-fourths of the cost of construction ; it may be more or it may be less than $30,000 a mile. Then the time for the completion of the western division is extended from 1908 to 1911. In view of the delays that have unavoidably taken place, that extension can, of course, be quite justified. The original contract, as you will perhaps remember, did not provide a time limit for the construction of the eastern division. While the Grand Trunk Pacific Company were bound to construct the western division within a certain time, the government were not bound by a time limit for the construction of the eastern division. Under the amended contract, as I read it, it is provided that in the event of the western division being completed and equipped with rolling stock to the amount of $15,000,000 before the eastern division is completed by the government, the company shall be entitled to the return of the $5,000,000 deposit, which, by the way, has been put up in cash as provided by the original contract. It will be noticed, however, that the original obligation to equip the line to the amount of $20,000,000 of which $5,000,000 is assigned to the eastern division, remains to be complied with when the eastern division is completed by the government. These two amendments, with the additional amendment regarding the holding of the common stock by the old Grand Trunk Railway Company, are, to my mind, the three Mr. GRANT.

important amendments. But, I repeat, these amendments leave the main features of the contract of last year undisturbed. We had,

I believe, an advantageous contract with the Grand Trunk people last year ; I believe we have an advantageous contract with them this year. The contract remains in all essential respects just as advantageous a contract for the country as it stood before.

Among other matters of a domestic nature that were freely discussed during the late recess, was the ever-present question of the tariff. Now, Sir, even among those who clamour for a stiff and arbitrary advance of the tariff all along the line, there is by no means unanimity as to what change or changes should be made. Of course, the ultra-protectionists clamour for a very substantial increase ail along the line. Other promoters of the agitation single out special industries which they assert are suffering by undue competition from without. The great mass of the consumers of this country have not yet been heard from, nor do they possess any organization by which they can, as a body, make their wants and wishes known. The consuming public have not the opportunity of recording their views at conferences or conventions, as other interests have. The great body of the people can express their convictions and their wishes on this and kindred matters only at the polls.

Now, Sir. I do not for one moment say that the existing tariff is a perfect tariff. A perfect tariff-that is, one to suit all the different sections of this great country, with its frequently changing conditions, and its many diverse interests-could only be framed and put into operation by perfect men ; that is to say, by a government composed of perfect members.

Well, Mr. Speaker, I quite admit that the 3 present administration is about as perfect an administration as ordinary human limitations will allow; but, I do not claim for them that they have been able, or will ever ; be able to form a tariff that will suit everybody, all the manufacturers and all the j consumers, always and at all times. I do put forward this claim, however,-and ; I say it with the assurance derived from the i records-that the present tariff, on the ; whole, has been a very satisfactory tariff : for Canada. And on what do I base this claim? First and foremost, our present tariff has been a good revenue producer. It has fulfilled one of the main functions of a tariff in that it has produced abundant rev- ; enue. I have already referred in part, to the figures since 1897, and I need not speak * further of our constantly enhanced receipts from customs. When I say broadly that the Minister of Finance was able to declare last year a surplus of fourteen or fifteen millions and this year will be able to sho^ even larger surplus, and when I say that wo are told on authority that there will* in all probability, be a further reduction

Hon. Gentlemen of the Senate :

Gentlemen of the House of Commons :

After the long protracted session of the last year, when so many important matters were dealt with, it is not probable that your duties will involve your being detained on the present occasion for any lengthened period.

I have no desire to make any invidious references or enter into any particulars, but simply throw out the suggestion to hon. gentlemen opposite, in the best of good feeling', that they would deserve well of their country if they would unite with gentlemen on the treasury benches in the endeavour to carry out the wish expressed by His Excellency and thus prove that the hope he indulged is not a vain one. I might perhaps enlarge on this theme, but I find that I am exceeding the limit of time at my disposal. Once more the representatives of the people are gathered together in parliament to devise measures for the good of our country. Never before in the history of this Dominion has its outlook been so bright. With the public treasury overflowing, with the fertile areas of our western country rapidly filling up with home-seekers and home-makers, with settlers and capital seeking our shores, surely it is incumbent on us to devise liberal measures, measures commensurate with the growth of Canada and her prospects, to meet the increasing demands of our rapidly increasing trade. All irritating questions of a racial and sectional type being happily out of the way, clean gone for ever, I fervently hope, Mr. Speaker, -thanks in the main to the master mind which has guided the destinies of this country since the Liberal party have come to office-we may confidently look forward to a lengthy period' of national growth and prosperity. The people of Canada need have no fear for the future, if measures bold and wise be devised for our development. In the great task of building up a nation on the northern half of this continent we must see that we lay the foundation strong, firm and sure. Let us be true to our splendid traditions, let us use wisely the magnificent heritage with which Providence has endowed us, and we cannot fail, in our day and generation, to contribute much to the up-building of our beloved Canada.

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LIB

Louis Alfred Adhémar Rivet

Liberal

Mr. L. A. RIVET (Hochelaga).

(Translation.) Mr. Speaker, the task which devolves upon me of seconding the address in answer to the speech from the Throne carries with it a responsibility, the thought of which impresses me particularly. I would have been tempted to avoid it had I not been assured of your indulgence and prompted by a deep sense of my duty towards my province and my country. I must say, however, that the able and eloquent remarks .iust made by the hon. member for North Ontario (Mr. Grant) have rendered that task much easier for me to fulfil.

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LIB

George Davidson Grant

Liberal

Mr. GRANT.

chose as its leaders on the 23rcT of June, 1896, and in whom to-day it has deservedly put its faith.

The most important measure announced in the speech from the Throne is, no doubt, the ratifying of the amendments made to the agreement with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company for the construction of the transcontinental! railway.

I wish, in the first place, Mr. Speaker, to express my deep satisfaction at the fact that these amendments do not in any way alter the original policy of the government on that national issue, and do not alter any essential feature of the agreement originally passed with the company. It is specially gratifying to me to note that the government persist, in spite of some interested criticisms, in their intention to build the eastern section of that great line. The building of that section, the main object of which is to give to our western farmers an all-Canadian railway line operated throughout the year and leading to our seaports, and also to develop those immense regions of northern Ontario and northern Quebec, seems to become more and more a plain necessity. I do not ask for better proof than the state-rnents made before the Canadian Club, on the 24tli February last, by Sir Sandford Fleming, our ablest expert in Canada. The statements on which that eminent authority based his approval of the building of the whole transcontinental in accordance with the government plan, have been published in the newspapers, and I need not repeat them here. I shall be content with saying that the force of such testimony is unquestionable. On the other hand, Dr. Bell, the noted geologist, has given recently on the agricultural, mineral and forest wealth of that eastern region an opinion which corroborates the testimony of Sir Sandford Fleming.

We have been apprised, Mr. Speaker, of the motives which have suggested that great plan of a new transcontinental railway. To connect the shores of the Atlantic to those of the Pacific by a new and allCanadian route, to open up for settlement immense regions abounding in mineral, agricultural and forest wealth, to ensure new outlets for the products of the west, where immigration from Europe and the United States is constantly pouring in ; lastly, to ensure the commercial independence and liberty of Canada. Such were tlie main reasons which the Prime Minister pointed out to the House in commendation of the scheme. These reasons, which the whole country approved of a few months ago, are to-day as cogent as ever. Let the transcontinental railway be built at once. Mr. RIVET.

such is the general wish of the people, as expressed by the result of the by-elections and voiced by enlightened business men and our ablest and most reliable experts in Canada.

As regards the amendments made to the agreement, they will, no doubt, have the approval of parliament. Those amendments are of such a kind as to leave no place for conflicting opinions. The terms of the contract were so much in favour of the government, certain conditions were so stringent on the company, that one could foresee how difficult it would be for the company to carry out the whole of its obligations. Unfortunately, those fears materialized. In spite of their good will and good faith, the company were at first unable to^make the cash deposit of five million dollars required by law. However, the recent and happy news of the replacing of the interim deposit by a legal one will be gratifying to the country as a whole. The increase in the government guarantee as regards the mountain section, which, as intimated officially a few days ago, forms one of the proposed amendments, will be approved of by all who will take the pains to investigate the immense difficulties which the company may encounter in the building of that part of the road.

The new recourse granted to bondholders is evidence of the wish of the government to protect more effectively those who are willing to invest their funds in the carrying out of this national undertaking. On that point, as on many others, England is letting us have the benefit of her practical ability and of her old-time experience in the management of public affairs. Our leaders could not seek inspiration at a better source or find a nobler example to follow. The additional delay of three years granted to the company for the building of the western section is a change of small importance, which only shows the willingness of the government to grant all the necessary liber-cari'ylng through of a work which will last for centuries.

xn oiiua

m Liiese amendments are commendable, inasmuch as they are in accord with the spirit of the original agreement, and are further evidence of the government's resolve to carry through an undertaking from which all parties interested are destined to reap great advantage. For those reasons. Sir, it would be desirable that no voice should be heard in this House in opposition to the Act introduced by the gov-eminent.

I did not make reference to a question < tlie greatest interest to tlie electoral dtvisic w nch has chosen me as its represen tativ that question, raised by our opponents, o

public contracts. Then the bon. member for North Norfolk continued as follows :

There is no subsidy in this contract. Now, Sir, I desire to refer to the wise provisions in the public interests contained in this agreement. Care has been taken in this respect. We have not a Minister of Railways and Canals with carte blanche in the construction of a transcontinental line. This would be a very pleasant condition, no doubt, for a public official to occupy.

And the present Minister of Railways and Canals (Hon. Mr. Emmerson) said :

And in that very attitude, it seems to me, he shows an .inconsistency which would almost lead one to conjecture that the real cause of his resignation was not the building of another line from the province of Quebec to the maritime provinces.

And my hon. friend from Hants (Mr. Russell) was particularly bitter. I shall not quote bis words, but they can be found by any bon. gentleman who desires to examine ' Hansard.' And my bon. friend from Victoria (Hon. Mr. Ross) used the following language with regard to Mr. Blair.

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LIB
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

The bon. member for Victoria tells us that he stands by these words :

I wonder if he had been asked to be the leader of this great commission that is to conduct this railway ipolicy, what his conduct would be and where we wop Id find him now. Well, let me say to them that an ex-Min,istsr of Railways and Canals does not count much in this country now, and when a man loses his seat in the government he loses his power and his influence.

That was the view of the situation entertained by my bon. friend from Victoria (Hon. Mr. Ross). The matter, therefore, stood in this position. There was a charge of absolute folly, of an absolute waste and squandering of public money made by Mr. Blair against the government. Not only that, but there was the charge, as interpreted by my bon. friend the Minister of Justice (Hon. Mr. Fitzpatrick), of unworthy motives in the making of this contract, which has been so much lauded. The government proposed to bring on an election. About that there cannot be much doubt. We have it on the authority of my hon. friend the Solicitor General (Mr. Lemieux). We also have the fact that campaign literature was distributed throughout the country. We also had the government putting up tlieir candidates in the majority of constituencies, and making every possible preparation for a general election. But, if all tales be true, a man came from New Brunswick and told my right hon. friend that that province was not in very good shape, and could not be counted on if Mr. Blair should take a part in the fight. What followed ? It was felt that it would be much better to have Mr. Blair disappear, and negotiations were entered into with the view of procuring his silence. And with all these charges of unworthy Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

motives and absolute folly unretracted and still ringing in their ears, the government appointed this gentleman to one of the highest positions at their disposal. I do not know what explanation my right hon. friend will give us, but this much must be said of Mr. Blair, that if the government have given him this certificate, both of ability and character, by appointing him chairman of the Railway Commission, every one of these hon. gentlemen opposite who attacked him, every one who called him shifty, as the hon. member for Hants did, and who belittled him in every way and imputed unworthy motives to him-every one of these gentlemen must do one of two things. They must either rise in their place and condemn the government for having appointed Mr. Blair to that position or apologize to Mr. Blair for the unfounded attacks they had made on him.

Mr. Speaker, the commission which has been appointed is one which has most important judicial duties to perform, and certain administrative duties also. It will have control over vast public and private interests, and it should be composed of men of the highest ability and absolutely beyond suspicion. Mr. Blair has charged the government with unworthy motives. He has denounced their transcontinental railway scheme as a wanton and senseless waste of public money. Not one of these charges has he ever retracted. On the other hand, the government have declared that Mr. Blair was actuated by unworthy motives. The men they put up to reply to Mr. Blair belittled him in every possible way. They called him shifty, insincere, and even treacherous. Yet the government have appointed this man to this important position. Was it or was it not their object to remove Mr. Blair by this means from their path in tire province of New Brunswick and throughout the country ? Can any other conclusion than that such was their object be drawn by any fair minded man in this House or country ? If there be any other conclusion which can be drawn, I have.no doubt that my right lion, friend (Sir Wilfrid Laurier), with that ability and ingenuity which always characterizes his utterances in this House, will be able to devise some reason for the appointment to this commission of a gentleman so opposed to the railway policy of the government.

This commission is an important one, and when the government, during last session, called upon us to vote large salaries for the men who were to compose it, there was not very much opposition from this side of the House. There was not from myself any word of protest. We realized that the men who should be called on to perform the

i.uties of that commission ought to be me'1 who would command a liberal salary. But. ii I might venture to make a suggestion 't seems to me that when the Appropriation Bill for that purpose was before the House,

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

unit in demanding for themselves the same powers of self-government which are enjoyed by the people of the older provinces. The Minister of the Interior (Hon. Mr. Sif-ton) recognized some time ago-whether he does now or not-the importance of this subject, because on the 21st of March, 1901, three years ago, in writing to the premier of the Northwest Territories he said :

I may say that I realize very fully the difficulties of the position in which the government and legislative assembly of the Northwest Territories is placed, and I admit that there is very much in the suggestions which are made in your letter and in the memorial regarding the necessity of a change in the constitutional and financial position of the Territories.

Without at the present moment committing myself to any positive statement I am prepared to say that the time has arrived when the question of organizing the Territories on the provincial basis ought to be the subject of fun consideration. It would appear to me- that the better way of bringing the matter to a more definite position would be to arrange for a conference upon the subject between the representatives of your government and a committee of council representing the federal government.

That meeting has, I believe, taken place. The matter has been occupying the attention of the government for three years. My hon. friend from North Ontario (Mr. Grant) said that the question of tariff revision was now about to occupy the attention of the government. Well, if the government do not proceed any more rapidly with tariff revision than with provincial autonomy, three years will elapse before there will be any tariff revision and I do not know how much longer afterwards. Sir, the people of tlie Northwest Territories are entitled to tlie same rights of self-government as are enjoyed by the people of the older provinces. According to the census and according to tlie estimate made by the government of the number of settlers who went into that country last year, there are no fewer than 350,000 people in the Territories, and I have no double that by midsummer the population will perhaps be 400,000. Why should not the right of self-government be granted to them ; why should they not have the same rights over their public domain, their lands and minerals as are enjoyed by the provinces of eastern Canada ? Why should not the people of the Northwest Territories be entitled, if they see fit, to incur debt for the purpose of giving to themselves adequate railway development. The railway which is proposed by the government is a single line of railway running across the continent and no such line of railway unless it has sufficient branches, can ever meet tile needs of the people of the Northwest Territories. They know best what they desire in that respect. They know wliat branch lines are necessary ; and if the people of Prince Iidward Island, if the people of British Columbia, a province with n small population but with enormous re-

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

than was accomplished by the former one ; because all that was accomplished by the former deposit and by the guarantee was that three or four years afterwards the guarantee was given up, and some five years afterwards we were called upon to vote an appropriation to return that deposit with interest. My right hon. friend on that occasion went further. He said :

It is with joy indeed that I welcome this explosion of satisfaction at the announcement that this scheme has not failed, but that it is to be carried -through. I know that in some quarters this idea of having this passenger traffic amongst us was not popular; but, Sir, let me say to you that if there is a patriotic idea in the land it is the idea that we should not only carry the freight, but carry the passengers between America and Europe. We can do it, we ought to do it, and now it is no longer in donht.

I may mention for the benefit of my right hon. friend that that speech was made by him on the 7th day of October, 1897, just six years and a half ago. The language of my right hon. friend on that occasion was eloquent. It almost reminded one of some of the eloquent phrases in which he introduced the transcontinental railway measure last year. In fact, I do not know that at any time in his speech of last year he soared to greater heights than he did when he told the country that the fast Atlantic service was no longer a matter ^of doubt. Well, what have the government accomplished since ? Has any step been taken ? A good deal of water has run under the bridges since that time ; the Boer war has been begun and ended ; but nothing has been done for the fast Atlantic service. What do the government propose to do ? Have they anything to say to tlie House with regard to this measure which is important not only to the maritime provinces, but to every province and every Individual in Canada ?

My hon. friend from North Ontario (Mr. Grant) referred also, and I trust in no faultfinding spirit, to the fact that the government had made no mention in the speech from the Throne of any step being taken towards rounding off this Confederation by including in it the Island of Newfoundland.

I commend my hon. friend from North Ontario for the independence he has shown in calling attention to this omission in the speech from the Throne. It is Worthy of the high opinion I have always had of that hon. gentleman, that he should have called the attention of the House to the omission of this all-important matter. Newfoundland has been called the ' sentinel of the St-Lawrence.' I should like to see it called the ' sentinel of Canada ' in the St. Lawrence, and to see this confederation rounded out by bringing that island in as a part of this great Dominion of which we are all so proud. In the debate on the speech from the Throne last year, I did suggest to the government that it would be a step worthy

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

the right hon. gentleman has not made very plain.

In conclusion I wish to go back for a moment to a subject which I have already mentioned, the attitude of this government in the first place with regard to the amendment to the Transcontinental Railway Act, and in the second place to the appointment of Hon. Mr. Blair as chairman of the Railway Committee. Does my right hon. friend remember his language of last year ? Does he remember his words when he said :

To those who urge upon us the policy of to-morrow and to-morrow and to-morrow ; to those who tell us, wait, wait, wait ; to those who advise us to pause, to consider, to reflect, to calculate and to linquire', otur answer is : No, this is not a time for deliberation ; this Is a time for action. The flood of tide is upon us that leads on to fortune ; if we let it pass it may never recur again. If we let it pass, the voyage of our national life, bright as it is to-day, will be bound in shallows. We cannot wait because time does not wait ; we cannot "wait because in these days of wonderful development, time lost is doubly lost.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inquire in view of that language of my right hon. friend how it is that when this measure was consummated by the signing of this agreement, when that agreement bound the gentlemen who were parties to it, when these gentlemen declared that this road was to go on, when these gentlemen put up a guarantee representing one million pounds sterling, when they declared through their official head that they were prepared to go on with the railway this spring without amendment, liow is it that my right hon. friend has called to them : Wait, wait, wait, till we get before parliament and give you further concessions. What about the flood tide then ? He did not then regard the flood-tide but hastened the opening of parliament in order that there might be further amendments.

But, at that time he said further :

Such is pur duty ; it iis immediate and imperative. It is not of to-morrow, but of this day, of this hour, and of this minute. Heaven grant that it may not be already too late'; Heaven grant that wMilst we 'tarry and dispute, the trade of Canada is not deviated to other channels.

Then he insisted upon haste. Now he says, " Wait, wait, wait, until we once more go before parliament with practically a new measure, and can insert in this agreement a provision providing that this railway shall be completed not in 1908, but in 1911. He now says wait, wait, wait until we can attach a provision to this contract by reason of which the completion of this road should' be delayed for three years beyond the time in which it was to be completed if the contract as originally designed had been carried out.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

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?

Some hon. MEMBERS

Hear, hear.

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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

In matters of obstruction.

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS

Hear, hear.

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

When the day of prorogation came, and in fact, the snow whitened the tops of the hills and if we had remained a few weeks longer it would have also whitened the vales. Five months have not yet elapsed since the day of prorogation. My hon. friends should allow us some time to' breathe. The members of this House Generally, are men of business. They have to earn their living, to attend to their own avocations and five months is not too long for the members of this House to attend to (heir own affairs before being called again to discharge the business of the country. I apprehend from what my hon. friend has said that it may be that the length of this session called at this moment may carry us into the season when members of this House would perhaps be better employed at then own business. There is a way, however, bj which we can correct any inconvenience that may arise from the late summoning of parliament and that is by preparing for an early closing of it. If my hon. friend will not act altogether upon the reproach which he made to my hon. friend from North Ontario (Mr. Grant), if the speeches are not too Jong, it the floodgates of eloquence are kept under control, perhaps we may expect that tun

House shall not have a session of eight months, not even a session of five months, but that we may prorogue m time som all of us may go to the country and j . the pure air in the leafy month of June.

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

Has that right ever been denied to Canada ?

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

If never granted.

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. R. L. BORDEN.

Has it ever We9 denied 1

Topic:   COMMON'S ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HIS EXCELLENCY'S SPEECH.
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March 14, 1904