September 24, 1903

LIB
CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

That was the first time the civil service was dealt with squarely in my opinion. The Postmaster General has said that the civil service at one time became very unpopular in the country. The hon. member for Macdonald (Mr. Boyd) has told us the reason for that. During that long campaign which took place regarding irregularities in the civil service' in 1891, constant attacks were made upon the civil service by hon. gentlemen opposite who were then in opposition, notably by the present Senator McMullen, who represented North Wellington, and Mr. Somerville, who then represented South Brant and others. Time after time we were obliged to defend the civil service in this House and in the country when they were unfairly attacked. It was because of those attacks that the civil service seemed unpopular. And I regret to say that these attacks prevented many men in the serivce from receiving even the justice they were entitled to for faithful and efficient service. As to the classes mentioned here, the hon. member said that the junior class were provided for under the Civil Service Act. Who made that Act ? The Conservative party. And the members of that party are entitled to credit rather than to have wholesale abuse heaped upon them because of what it is alleged they did not do for the service. I do not know whether the Postmaster General proposes that we should report these resolutions to-night-

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

Let us go through and carry them. Then, we will let them remain in committee.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

If we carry them, we must have the right to refer to them again. Because I wish to speak on several clauses.

On section 4,

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

If you are going to go through them at this rapid.rate, I will have to object, because discussion' is to take place on several of these clauses. I do not see why we should not stop where we are.

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

I do not wish to be unduly pressing. But the points are very simple.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

But there are fifteen clauses in this Bill, besides-

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

But we have been since ten o'clock discussing it, and the resolution has been before the committee a long time. I think there is no controversy over these clauses.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

This is a very important Bill. We took day after day discussing the Civil Service Bill in 1882, and in this we go over the same ground.

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

Are not we getting into the habit of putting in too much time on these matters ?

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

No more progress is likely to be made, because if the debate does not take place now, it must take place later on, and we must go back over the clauses that are passed.

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

I suggest that we go down as far as clause 10.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

With this understanding, that some of these may be referred to again.

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

Certainly.

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CON

Thomas Birkett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BIRKETT.

I desire to move the following amendment:

Section 12. That all the words after ' shall be ' in the second line of section 12, as proposed to be amended, be struck out, and the following be substituted therefor :-' $4,000 per annum.'

Section 16. The minimum salary of a chief clerk shall be $2,000 per annum, with an increase of $100 per year thereafter until a maximum of $2,600 is reached.

Section 18. The minimum salary of a first-class clerk shall be $1,600 per annum, with an increase of $100 for the first year, and $50 per year thereafter, until a maximum of $2,000 is reached.

Section 20. The minimum salary of a second-class clerk shall be $1,200 per annum, with an increase of $100 the first year, and $50 per year thereafter, until a maximum of $1,600 is .reached.

Section 4, chapter 14. The minimum salary of a junior second-class clerk shall be $700 per annum, with an increase of $50 per year thereafter, until a maximum of $1,200 Is reached.

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LIB

Archibald Campbell

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN (Mr. Campbell).

I think the amendment is out of order, I do not think it can be moved by a private member.

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

I would suggest that it would be more appropriate to move it as an amendment to the Bill and not to the resolution.

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CON

Thomas Birkett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BIRKETT.

I would like to ask the minister in charge of this Bill if he will increase the first years' indemnity from $50 to $100.

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

I am not in a position to increase any of the provisions of this resolution. This resolution has received the assent of His Excellency,

it is a money resolution, and therefore it cannot be amended upwards, it can only be amended in the, other direction.

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CON

Thomas Birkett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BIRKETT.

I admit that, what the Postmaster General says is true. If my amendment is out of order, I. do not wish to press it any further.

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September 24, 1903