July 28, 1903

LIB
CON
LIB

Duncan Cameron Fraser

Liberal

Mr. FRASER.

Without a name, they would be absolutely worthless, because they could be repudiated.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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LIB

William Ross

Liberal

Mr. ROSS (Ontario).

The case mentioned by the bon. member for Grey is very common. A merchant issues coins which are sold him by manufacturers on the other side. They resemble the coin of the realm, and they are good for their face value at his store. Instead of giving due bills to his customers, he gives these coins, which he takes in payment for goods. Is that contrary to the law ?

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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?

The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

I hope my hon. friend does not take it for granted that I am giving legal opinions off-hand. If he does, I am afraid he will have to take them for what they are worth and they will be worth very little, I do not like to give opinions except on the matter in hand.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

I fail to see any difference between marking a piece of metal with the name of the firm and the sum for which it is good and giving it to a customer to retain until he comes back to get the value in goods, and writing the same words on a piece of paper.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

I would be willing to adopt the common sense opinion of my hon. friend.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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LIB

John Charlton

Liberal

Mr. CHARLTON.

This cheque is not payable to any person's order or to any person. In that way it is different from a due-bill. A due-bill would be an acknowledgment of a certain amount due to a person named, payable in goods at the maker's store. This would be payable to one individual. But this cheque issued by the merchant for five, ten or fifty cents, or whatever it might be, would serve the purpose of a coin. It is transferable from person to person, and it may be transferred a hundred times before it gets back to the person issuing it. In that respect, it serves the purpose of money and rests on a different basis from the due-bill.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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LIB

Duncan Cameron Fraser

Liberal

Mr. FRASER.

But when one gets a due-bill and endorses it, it passes in the same way.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

I speak of this matter from having knowledge of it. The hon. member for North Norfolk (Mr. Charlton) is mistaken when he says that these tokens, when put into circulation, pass, perhaps a hundred times

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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LIB
CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

But every person who takes them knows that they are only redeemable in goods, and, unless the person wants to buy goods at that particular establishment, he will not take this coin in payment of a debt. I am aware that there are eases in which such a coin is occasionally used in payment of some little liability outside of the establishment that utters it. But these instances are trifling. The extent to which they go into circulation is almost nil. But the use of these coins to facilitate the business of the merchant is quite common in the country. The merchant need not write out a due-bill, but simply hands out the coin for whatever the amount may be. These tokens can be obtained in this country. They are manufactured and sold by a man in Galt, and a merchant can buy enough for S20 to suffice for a large business. They are very useful and I fail to see anything wrong in them.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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Robert Lorne Richardson

Mr. RICHARDSON.

These coins are also largely manufactured in this city. They are made of alluminum and are as light as wood. There can be no possibility of mistaking them for ordinary coins.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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LIB

John Charlton

Liberal

Mr. CHARLTON.

It is only in the fact that they are transferable and pass from hand to hand that they resemble coins.

On section 510,

By striking out the following words in line 32 thereof :-' Two hundred and sixty-eight, attempt to commit rape.'

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES (Victoria).

I desire to draw the attention of the Minister of Justice particularly to this section. The people of the Dominion have been shocked recently by a very foul murder in Collingwood, supposed to have been committed by two tramps. I notice also an account in the paper the other day of an engineer stopping his train to rescue a woman who was being assaulted by two or three tramps. One can hardly pick up a paper without reading of some such crime committed by these fellows who are going about without any visible means of support, with nothing to do, with no character to lose, and utterly reckless. I could quote various instances in my own section of the country where offences of this kind have been committed, and yet the fellows have escaped. My own opinion is that the public ought to turn out and shoot such offenders, at the same time, that would

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

hardly be quite consistent with good government. I draw the attention of the Minister of Justice to the matter in the hope that he will take the necessary steps to put down crimes of this kind.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

The accounts of such crimes as the hon. gentleman

On section 569,

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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LIB
?

The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

It is In the case of a search warrant-to enable a search warrant issued in one county to be executed in another county, provided it is backed in the same form as in the case of an arrest.

On section 575,

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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LIB

William Manley German

Liberal

Mr. GERMAN.

I would like to ask the Minister of Justice wherein this amendment *differs from the section of the Act as it at present exists in the Criminal Code ?

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.
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July 28, 1903