July 28, 1903

GOVERNMENT RAILWAY POLICY.

CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. F. D. MONK.

Before the Orders of the Day are called, I would like to ask my Mr. CLARKE.

right hon. friend if he can give us any intimation now as to when the railway resolutions will be brought down ? I understood that we were to have them to-day, and so did some of my colleagues. Is there any hope ?

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The PRIME MINISTER.

There is hope and certainty. I shall put a notice on the Order Paper to-day, and I intend to announce the railway policy of the government on Thursday.

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VISITORS TO CANADA.

CON

Ernest D'Israeli Smith

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. D. SMITH (Wentworth).

Mr, Speaker, before the Orders of the Day are called, I wish to draw the attention of the Prime Minister to a matter of some importance. At the present time there is a party of British journalists travelling through this country, and I understand from the papers that they are in charge of Mr. Scott, an officer of the Immigration Department. At a later date there is coming on a visit to this country a large body of members of the British House of Commons. This is a matter of considerable importance to this country, as these men, occupying the positions they do, will be able, . on returning to the old country, to reach a larger and more important constituency than perhaps any other body of men who have visited Canada for a long time, and will be able to do more to make known the-real merits of this country than could be done by a very large expenditure of money.

If the itinerary of these gentlemen can be in any way influenced by the government

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LIB

Lawrence Geoffrey Power (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

I suppose the hon. gentleman intends to conclude with a motion.

If he wishes simply to ask a question, he cannot base an argument upon it.

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CON

Ernest D'Israeli Smith

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SMITH (Wentworth).

I will conclude with a motion. I gather from the public press that these gentlemen are to go through the country as freely as a good many previous bodies of men of less importance going straight through to the west. Now, we are all extremely solicitous for the welfare of the west, and proud of it, and glad to do anything that can possibly be done to advertise the west and bring it to the attention of the people of the old world. But it seems to me that while we are not paying too much attention to the west, we are paying too little attention to the east. While Ontario and the other eastern provinces are being drained of their best iblood to fill up the west, which we are very glad to do, we want some steps taken to fill their places to as large a degree as possible with a good class of immigrants from other countries, especially fj-om the British Isles. If these gentlemen were taken through the western part of Ontario as far as Windsor, they would see a strip of territory quite unexcelled by any other in the world for agricultural pur-

poses, and they would see happy and comfortable homes and a thrifty people. Then, if they were to go through the county of Essex and see the great crops of corn, oats, tobacco and fruit grown in that county ; and if they were brought back by another route to the Niagara district, winding up in what is known as the garden of Canada, passing through those magnificent orchards, and getting a feast of the luscious peaches grown there, they would carry back to the old country a better idea of the climate of this country possibly than they had before. We have in the past been considerably damaged by the descriptions of Canada as a land of snow for six months in the year, and a land where wheat grows during the other six months. But I am satisfied that a very large proportion of the people of Great Britain are not cognizant of the fact that this country possesses large areas of land capable of yielding the best semitropical fruit, such as peaches and grapes ; and if they were taken through the country where they could see with their own eyes these fruits growing in profusion, it would be of infinite advantage to this country. We must have, it seems to me, a great deal more energy devoted in that direction. Then when they go through the Niagara district, let them see Niagara falls, not only one of the wonders of the world in itself, bit the scene of great enterprise at the present time, no less than half a million horsepower of energy being developed there. I am sure that these gentlemen would be delighted to see such an enormous undertaking as is being carried on at. Niagara falls at the present time. I move that the House do now adjourn.

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The PRIME MINISTER.

I agree with my hon. friend that it would be very advantageous and very much in the interest of Canada that these British journalists should see more of Canada than they propose. Of course, it is quite proper that they should go first to the North-west Territories which seem to be the centre of attraction, but I agree with my hon. friend that fliey should not deny themselves the pleasure of seeing what he calls the Garden of Canada. But there are so many at present, I do not know to which garden he particularly refers. He suggests that they should go to the province of Ontario, and see the wealthy farming community there. I agree with him, but I did not observe that he suggested that they should also visit the provinces of Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, or Prince Edward Island. There are some things to be seen outside of Ontario, in these provinces also, but if these journalists undertake to see everything worth seeing in Canada, I am afraid their stay will be so long that they will remain here forever. I do not know how far the suggestion of my hon. friend is practicable. I think that the Department of the Minister 235

of the Interior has something to do with the trip, and shall refer to my hon. colleague the suggestion of my hon. friend.

Motion to adjourn negatived.

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CRIMINAL CODE, 1892.


House again in committee on Bill (No. 215) further to amend the Criminal Code, 1892.-The Minister of Justice. On section 198 a, Every one is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to six months' Imprisonment -who is an inmate or habitual frequenter of a common bawdy house. Section 205 as heretofore amended.-By adding at the end of subsection 6 thereof, as enacted by chapter 42 of the statutes of 1901, the following paragraph (e.) Any distribution by lot as prizes, among the members or tickdt holders of any incorporated society established for the encouragement of art, of any paintings, drawings or other works of art : Provided always that such society has a license from the Secretary of State unrevoked and in full force permitting it to conduct such distributions, it being hereby enacted that the Secretary of State may grant such a license upon evidence to his satisfaction (1) that the society applying therefor is designed bona fide for the encouragement of art ; and (2) that under the constitution of the society the prizes to be distributed by it must consist solely of bona fide works of art, and must be themselves distributed by the society to the prize winners, and must not be repurchased by or on behalf of the society from the ' winners or from any person into whose hands they may come for money or other valuable consideration within a term of years after they are won ; and (3) that the constitution of the society prohibits the distribution or gift by it in any manner whatsoever, directly or indirectly, of prizes consisting of money or of any thing of value other than bona fide works of art as aforesaid : and it being further enacted that such licenses shall continue in force for one year only from the date of issue, hut may be renewed from year to year upon the application of the company, and that it shall be lawful for the Secretary of State, whenever it shall appear to him that any such society Is being perverted from its legitimate purposes, to nevoka and cancel the license issued to any such society, and that any action so taken by (ha Secretary of State shall be final and shall not be called in question by any society affected thereby. And provided^ further that in connection with such distribution the society shall have strictly and bona fide observed such provisions of its constitution and in no way directly or indirectly violated the same or any of them, or by advertisement or otherwise undertaken or announced that it would do anything contrary to such provisions.


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The MINISTER OF JUSTICE (Hon. Charles Fitzpatrick).

Representations have been made to me with respect to the consequences of this section should it become law. They are afraid at Montreal that it may start the lottery system all over again. This, however, is merely intended to enable the Art Union, of London, to carry on its very legitimate enterprise in this country.

(REVISED EDITION

As there is a number of other amendments,

X would ask that this section remain suspended until the next meeting of the committee.

Section allowed to stand.

On section 257,

Every one is guilty ol an offence and liable, on summary conviction, to a penalty not exceeding $50 and not less than $10, or to imprisonment with or without hard labour for thir.y days or to both, who, either directly or indirectly, sells or gives or furnishes to a minor under the age of eighteen years, cigarettes cigars or tobacco in any form : Provided that this section shall not apply to the sale to a minor for his parent or guardian under a written request or order of such parent or guar-

A person who appears to the magistrate to be under the age of eighteen years shall be presumed to be under that 'age, unless it is shown bv evidence that he is in fact over that ago, and the provisions of section 701a shall apply to offences under this section.

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Mr SPROULE.

Is this all that the government are going to do in the direction of the Bill of the hon. member for St. Lawrence (Mr. Bickerdike)-to raise by two years the age of the youth who are allowed to indulge in cigarette smoking ? X am afrai' this will hardly be satisfactory to the Women's Christian Temperance Union.

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The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

This section has the merit of displeasing both parties. The cigarette makers and the dealers generally are disatisfied with it on the one hand, and the Women's Christian Temperance Union on the other. I do not know that, for the present, I can do much more than make this peace offering. I throw this into the arena, between the two contending parties, and if neither wants it, I fear I can do no better just now.

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CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR.

I thought the bon. minister was going to allow this to stand.

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The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

Yes, I was just waiting for my hon. friend (Mr. Taylor) to suggest that.

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CON

Edward Frederick Clarke

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CLARKE.

I may say that a very large deputation of persons engaged in the tobacco trade came to the city within the last two or three weeks, and I had the pleasure of introducing them to the Minister of Justice. They complain very bitterly ot this amendment. They say that they do not keep their premises open for the purpose of supplying minors with cigarettes, but that if this section passes, they will be liable to blackmail. They suggest the propriety of allowing it to stand in the meantime. They recognize that some legislation must be passed in this connection, but this particular clause, they say, will bear very harshly upon thm.

Section allowed to stand.

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LIB

Charles Fitzpatrick (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. FITZPATRICK.

On section 341 A,

Every one who steals any plant, root, fruit or vegetable production growing in any place other than as aforesaid, the value of the article stolen, or the amount of the damage done, being (twenty-five) dollars at the least, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to a penalty

over and above the value of the article stolen, of the amount of the injury done, or to year's imprisonment, or to both.

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The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

I would suggest tilling in those blanks as follows^. As to the money penalty I suggest that it should be not exceeding $20 over and above the value of the article stolen, and the imprisonment not exceeding six months.

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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

This section refers to some previous enactment in the phrase ' other than as aforesaid.' What is the provision of the statute ?

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The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

This section is really intended to protect, for instance, the cranberry patches in Nova Scotia. The amendment was suggested by Mr. Chipman, who pointed out that where they grow large quantities of cranberries, heavy depredations are committed by parties who are reckless or malicious and who cannot be reached under the present law.

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July 28, 1903