June 17, 1903

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

I am under the impression that there is a provision of this kind with regard to the reformatory of the Good Shepherd in the city of Halifax, and I do not think it has been attended with bad results. We have in Halifax a Protestant industrial school and a Roman Catholic reformatory, the St. Patrick's Home, I think it is called ; and boys are committed to these two homes by the stipendiary magistrate in the city of Halifax under special legislation authorizing them to do so, instead of sending them to prison, the idea being that both women of this character and juvenile criminals are more likely to be improved by sending them to some such institution as this than by sending them to jail or penitentiary. That is the idea of the legislation, and I am inclined to think, from the experience of the city of Halifax, so far as lam familiar with it, that the object has to some extent been attained. I know that so far as boys are concerned a great deal of good has been done in the city of Halifax by the establishment of these homes, and that many boys who have been to these schools have gone out into life as honest, hard working, industrious citizens, when possibly a different result might have followed if they had been sent to prison in the ordinary way.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOOD SHEPHERD REFORMATORY, ST.
Sub-subtopic:   JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK.
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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HUGHES (Victoria).

That being the case, I would like some enactment placed in this Bill so that Protestant people, people of other denominations than those who are referred to here in New Brunswick, may be sent where they would have the beneficial influences of another institution than the prison. I would like the Minister of Justice to take hold of that, and put some enactment in this Bill which will make it general. Equal rights, equal laws and no special privileges.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOOD SHEPHERD REFORMATORY, ST.
Sub-subtopic:   JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK.
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CON

Edward Frederick Clarke

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CLARKE.

I understand from the Minister of Justice that so far as the incarceration of prisoners is concerned, it is within the jurisdiction of the provincial authorities, and in order to enable them to send females to this reformatory institution, they must come to this parliament for a measure of this kind. Is it a matter special to New Brunswick ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOOD SHEPHERD REFORMATORY, ST.
Sub-subtopic:   JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK.
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?

The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

Yes, it is absolutely a matter of provincial control, but we must give effect to it by declaring that this institution is of such a Character that the magistrate may send this particular class of criminals to it.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOOD SHEPHERD REFORMATORY, ST.
Sub-subtopic:   JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK.
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CON

Edward Frederick Clarke

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CLARKE.

We have nothing to do with the maintenance ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOOD SHEPHERD REFORMATORY, ST.
Sub-subtopic:   JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK.
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?

The MINISTER OF JUSTICE.

Nothing at all.

Bill reported, read the third time, and passed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   GOOD SHEPHERD REFORMATORY, ST.
Sub-subtopic:   JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK.
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SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.


The MINISTER OF FINANCE (Hon. W. S. Fielding) moved that the House go into Committee of Supply.


LIB

Joseph Israël Tarte

Liberal

Hon. J. ISRAEL TARTE (St. Mary's, Montreal).

The government has received during the last couple of years a large number of deputations and of petitions advising them and requesting them to readjust and revise the tariff in such a manner as to make it more protective of our national interests. Latterly these deputations, requests and petitions to my hon. friends on the treasury benches have become more urgent. Let me give a statement of some of the articles in respect of which these petitions and requests have been made to the government: Iron and steel, woollens, neckwear, yarns, cottons, boots and shoes, pulp, wall paper, granite monuments, earthenware and stoneware, gloves and mitts, carriages and parts, wagons and parts, agricultural implements and parts, soap, salt, barley malt, beet sugar, glass, bicycles and parts, cutlery, lead, wire, furniture, moulding, picture frames, &c., brushes, buttons, pianofortes and parts, watch cases, jewellery, jewellery cases, coffins and caskets, lumber, shingles, lath, hats, cords, mattresses, rice, gardeners' products, cereals in packages, oatmeal and cereals, spectacles, enamelled ware, twine and cordage, canned goods, pork, ham, bacon, horses, salt (bulk), spices, ground bones, games and toys, pickles and fireworks, and dozens and dozens of other articles, the list of which I will take the) opportunity of giving to ' Hansard,' as it would take too long to read it all.

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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?

The PRIME MINISTER (Right Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier).

I would call the attention of the hon. gentleman (Hon. Mr. Tarte) to the fact that the hon. Minister of Finance is the only one who is allowed to put in statistics without reading them.

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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LIB

Joseph Israël Tarte

Liberal

Hon. Mr. TARTE.

It has been allowed in former cases, but I will take note of the observation of my hon. friend.

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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?

The PRIME MINISTER.

Read.

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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LIB

Joseph Israël Tarte

Liberal

Hon. Mr. TARTE.

I shall not read the list now as I do not wish to take up too much time. There are other means of letting the country know' of the industries that have applied to the government. Public bodies have also petitioned the members of the government. Let me read a resolution adopted by one of the most important bodies, if not the most important in Canada, the Board of Trade of Montreal, on the 14th October last:

Resolved, that in the opinion of this meeting it is manifestly the urgent duty of the Dominion government to adopt a comprehensive-

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR.

Mr. Speaker. I rise to a point of order. The right lion, leader of the Hon. Mr. FITZPATRICK.

government (Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier) has just laid down the rule that a portion of a document not read by the hon. member for Montreal, St. Mary's (Hon. Mr. Tarte) but from which he has quoted cannot go on ' Hansard.' The hon. Postmaster General (Hon. Sir William Mulock) in answering a question to-day said that there were three or four pages that he would not read but that he would give to ' Hansard.'

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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LIB
CON

George Taylor (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942))

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR.

If one hon. member is to be allowed the privilege on that side of the House an independent member must be accorded the same privilege.

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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LIB

Joseph Israël Tarte

Liberal

Hon. Mr. TARTE.

That does not matter. I know that the rule is as the right lion, leader of the government lias stated. I do not take any objection to it. I think it is a fair rule, but let me quote what I was going to present to the House -the resolution of the Montreal Board of Trade.

Resolved, that in the opinion of this meeting it is manifestly the urgent duty of the Dominion government to adopt a comprehensive and positive policy in regard to transportation facilities.

That this great problem should be dealt with on broad national lines covering present and providing for future requirements in so far as the progress and development of the country may be estimated ;

That as a first principle, the aim should be to provide for transportation facilities for the commerce of this country, east and west, through Canadian channels ;

That in the opinion of this meeting, to avail of the natural advantages and exceptional position of our country, the Dominion government should press forward the works already undertaken in the St. Lawrence river, with the deepening, widening and lighting of the channel with the work upon the inland waterways and canals and with the modern equipment of the harbours and ports ; and

Further resolved, that in the opinion of this meeting, in view of the changing conditions in the commercial wTorld, the Dominion government should examine carefully into the working of our present customs tariff on imports, and should so readjust the same as to secure Canadian industrial products against the competition of foreign labour.

That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Sir Wilfrid Laurier and his colleagues.

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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CON

Edward Frederick Clarke

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CLARKE.

Is that from the Board of Trade of Montreal ?

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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LIB

Joseph Israël Tarte

Liberal

Hon. Mr. TARTE.

That resolution was adopted by the Board of Trade of Montreal on the 14th October last. The time seems to be opportune for a revision of our fiscal policy. The revenue is buoyant. The hon. Minister of Finance has told us that at the end of this month, which is the end of the fiscal year, we will have a surplus of $13,500.000. Such a state of our finances makes it easy for the hon. gentleman and his colleagues to deal with the fiscal situation. The hon. Minister of Finance has a broad margin to play upon. It is indeed more con-

venient and more comfortable for governments to revise tariffs when the treasury is in a prosperous condition, just as it is easier and more comfortable for a nation to prepare for war in a time of peace. Our imports are a good deal over $200,000,000 a year. We require the goods that we so import, otherwise, we would not import them. On a large volume of these goods there are duties. This year we will raise in round cumbers $32,000,000 in customs duties. Before we can remove from the custom-houses one single p.iund of merchandise that we buy from foreign countries, we have to pay certain duties-20 per cent, 25 per cent, 30 per cent, 35 per cent. These duties are clear taxation. They represent so much money taken from the pockets of the public and put into the treasury. I suggest that we remodel the Canadian tariff so as to relieve the people as much as possible from that taxation. They will be so relieved, if we manufacture and produce the goods that we can manufacture and produce advantageously ourselves. Buying foreign goods means paying tribute to foreign countries, foreign manufacturers and foreign producers. It means, in my humble opinion, giving a preference to foreigners over the sons and over the workers of our own land. Bet me read an extract from a leaflet that was published last year by Mr. Walker, in London, which is straight to the point. He says :

Articles that our own manufacturers can easily produce are supplied to us by foreign manufacturers, thus making the flow of goods from our own factories less than it ought to be and consequently causing fewer men to be employed in these factories than would be the case if foreigners had not free admission to our markets. Now, we Englishmen, living in the United Kingdom ought to have more rights and privileges in our own country in addition to those named than foreigners not living in this country, and so not under its laws.

Our laws give our government a right to tax us for the purpose of paying its expenses, and also the right to call upon us, if necessary, in time of war, to defend our country.

If we objected either to the paying of any taxes, or to any liability of being called out in time of war as defenders of our country, we should have no right to expect our country to employ us to do its work in preference to foreigners not living under its control.

The motto, ' England expects every man to do his duty,' stirs us up to do ours.

Another motto shows equal confidence, ' Englishmen, whilst doing their duty, are expecting that England is doing hers.'

England having certain claims on her sons that she has not on foreigners living in other lands, is it not natural that these sons should expect some favour from England in exchange for the claims that she has on them, and how can England grant them any favour except it be by buying their produce in preference to that which owes its origin to foreigners living in other countries ?

I leave these words to the consideration of all those who are approaching the subject under discussion with open minds. I need not say that we are blessed with immense resources ; our lands are the most fertile under G id's sun ; we have minerals in abundance; our water powers are innumerable and great ; our climate is varied and excellent; our soil produces all the comforts of life and everything that a people can desire ; our geographical position is splendid ; our waterways unite the different parts of the Dominion, and they also give us access to ail parts of the world. On the east we have the Atlantic ocean and on the west the Pacific. Through the first we have access to the markets of Europe and the motherland, and through the Pacific we have access to the Orient, to China and Japan, which, will become more and more civilized and in the not far-distant future be centres of trade and commercial activity. We have grand raw materials in our hands; we have something to work upon. May I ask those who flo not take the same view of onr fiscal policy as we do ; may I ask them not to take a narrow view of the situation as it is to-day. We who believe in protection are often told ; nay, we are often reproached that we are working for the manufacturers, for a privileged class, and that we are forgetting the interests of the community at large. Weil. Sir. the manufacturers are hut a very insignificant quantity in the great problem that we have to face now ; they are but a bucket full in the ocean of interests that present themselves to onr attention in this phase of our national life. After all, the manufacturers are only a few hundred men. Where are those few hundred going to be in say twenty years ? What portion of the American interests did the Yankee manufacturers represent thirty years ago ? In my estimation, although the manufacturing interests in Canada are of great importance, they fall far below the importance of the agricultural interests. The tillers of the soil should receive our first attention and our earnest consideration at the present juncture.

Topic:   SUPPLY-GOVERNMENT TARIFF POLICY.
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June 17, 1903