May 18, 1903

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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS (Hon. James Sutherland).

I do not think there is much in the objections of my hon. friend from Halton (Mr. Henderson). The association at whose instance no doubt my hon. friend brought this Bill before the House, is a very large, important, influential and intelligent class of people, and its representations have no doubt been made to the minister and to the department and to the members of this House from year to year. I think the hon. member for North Simcoe is quite within his right, as any member would be, in introducing legislation of this class, and I think it is a very good way to bring the matter to the attention of the House and the country. One hon. member suggested that the Bill might be printed and distributed among those who should have an opportunity of studying the views of the association in regard to the proposed legislation. With regard to the criticism of my hon. friend the Minister of Marine and Fisheries, the remarks he has made show that his department are taking a deep interest in this subject, with a view to protecting the public interest, and he has informed the House that the delay which he is now asking for is necessary because he has not yet received a report from the technical officers of his department on these matters. I am inclined to think myself that some of the amendments asked for by this association are just and defensible, in the public interest ; with regard to others there may be a difference of opinion ; and in that respect, I agree with the hon. member for Halton that those interested in these matters should be asked to report to the minister and the House, and give us the benefit of their experience. At the same time, I think my hon. friend is doing his duty to a large class of people and to the public in bringing this matter before the House, as he has done, because it is difficult for one not well

versed in all these matters to understand the representations made to them by the parties so much interested.

Topic:   STEAMBOAT INSPECTION ACT. 189S- AMENDMENT.
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CON

James Clancy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CLANCY.

Has the hon. gentleman taken into consideration the fact that there is a very large number of men in this country who have never passed examinations, who have never belonged to an association, who are advanced in years and who are yet very efficient men, owing to their long experience. That class of men would be entirely cut out if this Bill became law.

Topic:   STEAMBOAT INSPECTION ACT. 189S- AMENDMENT.
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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

That being the case, no doubt the House will be particular about passing legislation that would do injustice to a large class of men. We all know that there are many men capable of doing work of this description, who perhaps could not pass a technical examination, and that is one of the great difficulties we have in legislating on matters of this kind. But that objection could be guarded against no doubt by the officers of the department whose special duty it is to deal with these matters. We have to think first of the public who use the boats, and then we have to see that no injustice is done to the class just mentioned. But I think we may by means of legislation bring about a gradual improvement in the class of men who are taking up this business.

Topic:   STEAMBOAT INSPECTION ACT. 189S- AMENDMENT.
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Motion agreed to, Bill read the second time.


INSPECTION OF TEXTILE FABRICS.

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Mr. W.@

SCOTT (West Assiniboia) moved second reading of the Bill (No. 137) to regulate the sale and provide for the inspection of textile fabrics. He said : The purpose of this measure is fairly well set out in its title. The main intent of the Bill is contained in the third clause, which reads as follows.

3. Every manufacturer of textile fabrics shall mark, label or tag such goods in plain printed letters or figures which cannot be detached except by design ; and the mark, label or tag shall state accurately the constituent fibres of every material of which such goods are composed and their relative proportions.

As I said when introducing this measure, it is one of considerable importance to the public in general, the wool raisers of the country in particular, and incidentally to the woollen manufacturers. I may state that the measure was prepared by the Sheep-growers' Association of the North-west Territories. at whose instance I am introducing the Bill. The conditions of the wool trade in the North-west Territories, as throughout Canada generally, have been for a long time past very depressed. It must be within the knowledge of every hon. member that notwithstanding the great prosperity which prevails generally, the prices of wool remain depressed, not only in this country, but in the world over. In England many of the

Topic:   INSPECTION OF TEXTILE FABRICS.
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CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

I rise to a point of order. I submit that this Bill is not regularly before the House. This is a Bill affecting trade and has not been introduced first by resolution. Following the decision you gave, Mr. Speaker, a few moments ago,

I fail to see any difference between the present Bill and the Bill of the hon. member for Montreal (Mr. Bickerdike); and if you are going to rule that Bills of this kind must be introduced by resolution, I do not see that there is any object, at this late hour, in continuing the discussion. I ask for your ruling.

Topic:   INSPECTION OF TEXTILE FABRICS.
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LIB

Thomas Walter Scott

Liberal

Mr. SCOTT.

If my hon. friend (Mr. Henderson) will defer his point of order for three minutes, I will state the other point I wish to call to the attention of the House.

Topic:   INSPECTION OF TEXTILE FABRICS.
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CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

I think that when tlie whole question of the introduction of Bills has been so thoroughly considered and the similarity of the two Bills is so complete, there should be no difficulty in arriving at the decision at once as to whether this Bill is in order or not.

Topic:   INSPECTION OF TEXTILE FABRICS.
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LIB

Lawrence Geoffrey Power (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

I am afraid that the point of order taken by the hon. member (Mr. Henderson) is well founded. The same question came up some years ago. I find that the Bills respecting the inspection of staple articles of Canadian produce have generally been founded on resolutions. If I mistake not this Bill provides for certain inspection. Now, we have decisions in similar cases. It was decided that a Bill respecting the culling and measurement of timber should originate in Committee of the Whole; also a Bill regulating the sale and disposal of butter did not pass its second reading because it was not commenced in 104

Committee of the Whole. I think this last decision applies to the Bill of the hon. gentleman, and I do not hink the motion for the second reading would be in order.

Topic:   INSPECTION OF TEXTILE FABRICS.
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DRY DOCKS CONSTRUCTION-GOVERNMENT AID.


Resolution respecting the payment of a subsidy for the construction of a dry dock, read the second time, and agreed to. The MINISTER OF FINANCE (Hon. W. S. Fielding) moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 178) respecting the encouragement of the construction of dry docks. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time. On motion of the Minister of Finance, House adjourned at 11.50 p.m.



Tuesday, May 19, 1903.


May 18, 1903