May 4, 1903


Arabian 43 Armenian 109 Austrian 385 Australian 34 Bulgarian 5 Belgian 148 Bermudian 1 Bohemian and Moravian 144 , Bukowinian 1 Crotian and Slovenian 1 Dutch 35 Doukhobors 7 Egyptian 1 French 449 Flemish 5 Finnish 1,226 German 1,012 Galician 1,663 Greek 122 Great Britain- English 13,634 Welsh 227 Scotch 2,203 Irish 1,107 West Indians ll Hebrew 1,669 Hungarian 767 Italian 2,263 Moldavin 1 Maltese 2 Mennonltes 24 Newfoundlanders 196 New Zealanders 2 Polish 149 Persian 40 Roumanian 294 Russian 2,999 Servian 1



Slovak 24 Spanish 7 Saxonians 12 Swiss 39 Syrian 765 Scandinavia- Danish 141 Icelandic 326 Swedish 1,082 Norwegian 477 Prussian 5 Turkish 34 United States citizens 96 Nationalities via ocean ports. 34,524 Returned Canadians 2,468 Tourists 199 From United States at Winnipeg and outports 24,487 Total 61,687


BINDER TWINE.

LIB

Mr. HEYD asked :

Liberal

1. W'hat was the quantity used, and average cost per pound, respectively, of manilla, sisal, or other hemp, in the production of hinder twine, in the Kingston penitentiary, 1901-2 ?

2. What was the cost, or allowance, for labour, and also for any material other than hemp, used in the production of said twine ?

3. What was the average price per pound at which the twine was sold ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   BINDER TWINE.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF JUSTICE (Hon. Charles Fitzpatrick) :

[DOT]

1. 28,376 pounds of manilla; average price

86 per cwt ; 122,000 pounds of sisal; average price, $6.28 per cwt. ,

2. Convict labour, $896.32; other material, $839.68.

3. 5* cents.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   BINDER TWINE.
Permalink

TRANSLATORS OF DEBATES.


Mr. CLARKE-by Mr. Monk-asked : 1. Who is the owner of the building, No. 461 Sussex street, Ottawa, used as an office by the translators of debates ? 2. What is the rent paid therefor per annum? 3. How long have the translators occupied the said building ?


?

The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS (Hon. James Sutherland) :

1. The property in question is rented by the government from Mr. D. V. Ranger.

2. $420. ' '

3. Since 1893.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TRANSLATORS OF DEBATES.
Permalink

THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY-ADDITIONAL CAPITAL.


Mr. MeCREARY asked : 1. Has the government any information of the manner in which the Canadian Pacific Railway Company has applied the sum of nine million dollars, which, under the terms of the Act of last session, 2 Edward VII., chapter 4, was to he expended for rolling stock ? 2. Has any part of that sum been expended in pursuance of the Act ; and if so, how much ?


?

The MINISTER OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS (Hon. A. G. Blair):

1. Yes.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY-ADDITIONAL CAPITAL.
Permalink
LIB

Sir WILLIAM MULOCK. (Minister of Labour; Postmaster General)

Liberal

2. Yes. The following amount lias been expended in pursuance of the Act referred to, accordiug to a statement furnished by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,- First. Rolling stock actually acquired and

paid for.

Locomotives

116 $2,143,068.85Sleeping, dining, parlour, official and pay cars

20 250,798.77Passenger, tourist and colonist coaches

30 248,237.66

Baggage, mail and express

cars

14 62,600.91Conductors vans

133 113,623.47

Box, stock, refrigerator and

furniture cars

3,839 3,484,578.67Flat, coal and ore ears.. .. 546 434,925.S6Other cars, snow ploughs, &e 50 223,785.22Total $6,961,619.41

Second. Rolling stock now under contract and in course of construction and which will be delivered during the ensuing summer.

Locomotives

120 $2,593,048.00Sleeping and dining cars.. .. 14 273,465.00Passenger coaches

39 396,050.00

Box, stock and refrigerator

cars

357 422,875.00Flat, coal and ore cars

1,455 1,048,200.00

Grand total $11,695,257.41

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY-ADDITIONAL CAPITAL.
Permalink

LIGHT-KEEPER-PEGGY'S COVE, HALIFAX COUNTY.


Mr. BORDEN (Halifax)-by Mr. Monk-asked : 1. Has George Swinehammer, of Peggy's Cove, Halifax county, been dismissed or relieved from his position as light-keeper ? And if so, for what reason ? 2. For what length of time h$s he occupied the position of light-keeper ? And does the government propose giving him any retiring allowance, or other compensation, in view of his advanced age and long service ?


?

The MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES (Hon. Raymond Prefontaine):

1. George Swinehammer, keeper of the light at Peggy's Gove, Halifax county, was relieved from his position as light-keeper on account of his advanced age, and loss of activity consequent thereon. At the time Mr. Swinehammer was released, he was 74 years of age, and the department was informed officially that on account of the want of physical activity and intelligence consequent upon his age lie was not adapted to act as keeper of a light of that order. It appears that lighting apparatus of a very improved character was adopted at this station, and that for the want of the qualifications mentioned an explosion occurred, and the apparatus was partially destroyed. The department was forced to the conclusion that in the interest of the public service it was necessary to appoint a younger and more active man.

2. air. Swinehammer bad been in the public service since 1883. He was not eligible for superannuation on retirement. The salary was $300 per annum, and no eompen-

sation or allowance lias been made him as lie could not receive the superannuation allowance on retirement. The department, might, if necessary, consider, after gathering information on the matter, whether it would be expedient to make some allowance in this case.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   LIGHT-KEEPER-PEGGY'S COVE, HALIFAX COUNTY.
Permalink

TRENT VALLEY CANAL.

?

Sir. H. A.@

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TRENT VALLEY CANAL.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS (Hon. A. G. Blair).

There is a good deal of difference in the width of the canal as well as in the length. Mr. Rogers calculates .upon a width of 50 feet at the

bottom, and Mr. Maingy upon a width of only 22 feet.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TRENT VALLEY CANAL.
Permalink
CON

Henry Alfred Ward

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WARD.

I am quite aware that there is a large difference in regard to the size. At the same time, it seems to me that this difference does not justify in any way the enormous discrepancies! in the estimated quantities of earth and rock excavation. I happen to know that only at the town of Port Hope is there any rock excavation whatever, and Mr. Rogers, in his report, simply expresses a doubt as to whether there would be any large amount of rock excavation to be done in getting rid of the height of land a short distance from Rice lake. It is mere guess work, so far as I can see. I do not think he could have made a careful survey, or his quantities would have been expressed in a different manner. If the Minister of Railways will examine Mr. Rogers' report in regard to estimates, he will find that they are lump sums in every instance ; for instance, 175,000 cubic yards for rock excavation, and 5,500,000 exactly for earth excavation. If you follow the estimates all through you will find that they are just lump sums. On the other hand, if you take Mr. Maingy's report or Mr. Rubidge's report, you will find they are figured right down almost to cents. So I think in that regard also there ought to be some inquiry made into that report.

Now, there is another matter which I would like to bring to the attention of the minister, and that is the levels of the great lakes. It seems to me that is one of the most important matters to consider before finally completing this canal. I have taken the trouble to obtain from the Marine Department a chttrt of the lake levels during a large number of years, particularly of Lake Ontario ; and I also have in my possession a chart of the levels of Lakes Michigan and Huron. In examining the one issued by the Marine Department, I find the levels of Lake Ontario almost exactly corresponding in the years I have mentioned. Now, the lake levels have been going down almost steadily since 1838, until in 1895 the Ipwest level was attained by the great lakes that probably ever existed in the history of the country, so far as the memory of man runs, at any rate. In 1895 the level of the great lakes went down about six feet below the level of 1838. In the chart furnished by the Marine Department I find that during the last four years, up to 1901, the level of Lake Ontario has been almost exactly the same, being one and a half foot above the level of 1895, which was the lowest that was ever attained. The low levels of 1899 and 1900 were only six inches above the level of 1895. Now, a gentleman from Port Hope who examined the Trenton harbour last year found that there were only seven feet of water in that harbour, so that if the level of 1895 were to be again attained by Lake Ontario, you would only have

about six feet or six and a half feet of water in the harbour of Trenton. I think the hon. minister knows that the harbour of Trenton has a rocky bottom, and that a great deal of blasting and dredging would have to take place and that in all probability the canal would be perfectly useless if the level of 1895 were to come again. I just call this fact to the attention of the hon. minister because it seems to me that it is a very important thing ; if he does grant this survey, and I think he has given us a good deal of encouragement in that direction, that the lake levels should be taken and that the harbour of Trenton should be most carefully examined. At Port Hope we have a harbour with about fourteen feet of water-perhaps not that depth all through the harbour, but there is a depth of from twelve to fourteen feet all through the harbour. It seems to me that, taking all these things into consideration, we are asking very little in requesting that this comparative survey should be made, and I trust the hon. minister will take it into his most serious consideration and do what I at least think is manifestly in the interests of the country.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TRENT VALLEY CANAL.
Permalink
CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT (East Simcoe).

Mr. Speaker, the question of the construction of the Trent Valley canal is one of very great interest to the county of Simcoe and to the different counties that abut and adjoin Lake Simcoe. I am not particularly concerned from a local point of view as to whether this canal shall be built, by way of the route suggested by the hon. member for East Durham (Mr. Ward), or whether it shall follow what has in the past been discussed as the probable route, namely by way of Trenton, but, what we wish to see, in the county of Simcoe, is the work speedily taken up and pressed with greater dispatch than it has been since its commencement. I think in this House a great deal of prejudice has been engendered against this work owing to the fact that hon. gentlemen are not conversant with the details of it and I think ifc is to be regretted that the people of Peterborough and those living along that portion of the route where work has been done to a considerable extent have not interested themselves in having other hon. members of this House to go over the route as the hon. Minister of Railways and Canals did a few years ago, and become thoroughly conversant with the wants cf these localities and see how they will be met by the construction of this canal. This system of waterways, extending from Lake Ontario to the waters of Lake Huron, is some 200 miles in length and of this great distance of 200 miles, as I understand, some fifteen or twenty? miles only call for what might be termed, actual canal wbrk. Along the line of the work there are very many large lakes, one of which is Lake Sini-coe. Then, above Peterborough there i^ Stony lake, Pigeon lake and other lakes, the names of which I have not, on the tip Mr. WARD.

of my tongue at the present moment, but I know from having been on them that they are also waters of considerable size. One protest that has been made against the expenditure of money on this canal has been based upon the fact that the boats that would ply on it would be too small to be successful from a business point of view, i may say that the report of the hon. Minister of Railways and Canals, containing the report of the engineer who is in charge of the work, proves that there is, to-day, over the sills, a depth of six feet of water and when it is considered that boats built with fiat bottoms and having a depth of six feet will carry from 20,000 to 25,000 bushels of grain it must be plain that it would be a considerable factor in the carrying trade of the country. I know that a few years ago an American company that had the choice of erecting an elevator at Buffalo or at a Canadian point, erected an elevator at the town of Midland, where I reside, having a capacity of a million and a quarter bushels and one of the most modern elevators on the great lakes. As a proof of this I may say that it elevates 20,000 bushels per hour which is a fair indication that it must be a very modern concern. I have it from gentlemen interested in the erection of that elevator that one fact that induced them to place their business at Midland was that they would ultimately have water competition from Midland to Montreal. We have spent an immense amount of money on our canal system, and while I am not going to say a word against the amount of money that has been spent on the St. Lawrence canal system, it must be remembered that this Trent Valley canal will be a great feeder to and factor in the St. Lawrence canal system, because, whether the outlet on Lake Ontaro shall be at Trenton or Port Hope, the ultimate destination of the grain carried in vessels will be the port of Montreal. Now, let us look at what has been the effect already of the construction of the locks that have been completed so far. I find from the report of the hon. Minister of Railways and Canals last year that no less than 5,185 lockages were made by vessels doing business on these upper lakes. It must be remembered that so far they have not yet had the advantage of being able to go out on Lake Huron or Lake Ontario and that therefore no through trade has been done. Yet, these figures show an increase of 857 lockages over the preceding year. I may say that the hon. minister, when lie went up there a few years ago, and I had the pleasure of being present when he was on that trip, we were surprised to find the class of boats engaged in the trade on the system because there are steamers plying in those waters that will accommodate as many as 400 passengers. It therefore goes without saying that if these locks can accommodate boats of that size, they can also accommodate vessels carrying a considerable amount. of grain.

As a local work for the counties of Simcoe, York and Ontario, it will be of great interest, and let me, in passing, refer to one fact. I am informed that the large cereal concern which has been established at Peterborough was to a certain extent attracted there owing to the fact that it has that magnificent water route which will ultimately give it connection with the waters of the Georgian bay and enable it to bring the vast quantities of grain that it consumes from the upper lake ports to Peterborough and when I say that at that point this one concern is consuming no less than

15,000 bushels of grain per day, and that the expectation is that it will double that in a few years, the importance of this work will be appreciated.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   TRENT VALLEY CANAL.
Permalink

May 4, 1903