April 6, 1903


with the sale of Canadian tobacco in foreign countries ? 2. What was the cost of that trip ? 3. What is the amount paid to Mr. Blaise Dugas, and does that sum cover all that is due to him ? 4. What has been the result of that trip ? 5. If there is a writen report from Mr. Dugas, will it be printed and laid on the Table of this House ? The MINISTER OF FINANCE (Hon. W. S. Fielding) : 1. Yes. 2. $4T0.25. 3. $470.25 paid for time and expenses of trip to Belgium; $146.25 paid for time and expenses collecting samples of tobacco and delivering lectures in Quebec; .$36.50, still due for time and expenses delivering lectures in 1903. 4. Useful information has been obtained and published by means of lectures in the tobacco-growing districts of Quebec. 5. Yes.


IMPORTS OF OXIDE OF ALUMINUM.

CON

James Robinson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROBINSON (Northumberland) asked :

How many tons of oxide of aluminum (alumina (Alo Oa ) was imported into Canada for the fiscal year ending June, 1902 ? What country or countries was it imported from ? What port or ports was it entered at, and what was the valuation for duty ?

Topic:   IMPORTS OF OXIDE OF ALUMINUM.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF CUSTOMS (Hon. ffm. Paterson).

The officers of the department inform me that the article mentioned in this question is not specified under that name in the classification of imports in the Trade and Navigation tables, nor will they be able to get the information asked for without special examination of invoices at different ports of entry. If the hon. gentleman will specify the different articles, such as baroxite, corundum, emery, &c.. on which he wishes to obtain information, they will endeavour to get it.

Topic:   IMPORTS OF OXIDE OF ALUMINUM.
Permalink

IMMIGRATION STATISTICS.


Mr. ROSS (Ontario) asked ; 1. What has been the total immigration into Canada each year during the past ten years ? 2. What has been the total expenditure on immigration each year during the same period? 3. What has been the total immigration during each month of this calendar year ? 4. When did the first immigration, of which the department has a record, commence from the United States to Canada ? 5. How many settlers or immigrants have come to Canada from the United States during each year of which the department has a record ? 6. Of the total immigrants arriving from the United States, how many have declared themselves of Canadian origin ?


?

The POSTMASTER GENERAL (Hon. Sir Wm. Mulock).

The return asked for would be rather voluminous, and perhaps

Topic:   IMMIGRATION STATISTICS.
Permalink
CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

my hon. friend would be good enough to make a motion for it.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION STATISTICS.
Permalink

P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.

?

Mr. J. J.@

HUGHES (King's, P.E.I.) moved for :

Copies of all correspondence received by the government, or any department of the government. and the answers made thereto, concerning the winter navigation of the Northumberland Straits, during the season of 1902-03.

He said : Mr. Speaker, I desire to say

a few words in explanation of this motion. When Prince Edward Island entered into confederation in 1873, this stipulation was set out in the agreement :

The Dominion government shall provide and maintain an efficient steam service between the Island and the mainland, winter and summer, thus placing the island in continuous communication with the Intercolonial Railway and the other railways of the Dominion.

There was no stipulation in the agreement that was considered so important by the people of Prince Edward Island and by the delegates appointed to negotiate the terms of union, as this. There was no stipulation that appealed with so much force to the people of Prince Edward Island as this, by which their isolation was to be a thing of the past; but there is no stipulation that has been so much disregarded. The service during the last season was the worst that has ever been experienced during any year since we came into confederation. It has been all the worse comparatively speaking, because the trade of the island, as well as the trade of other parts of the Dominion, has greatly increased in the last few years, and therefore we felt it the more keenly and severely that that trade was interrupted during several months of the past year. During the last few years the trade of the country in the finished products of the farm has so greatly increased-and this will apply to all the provinces of old Canada lying east of the great lakes-that between 1890 and 1902, the exports of these products have increased $24,000,000 to a total of $80,000,000.

The farmers of Prince Edward Island have contributed their full share of this increase ; and they have besides supplied a largely increased home market. To prove this, I need only mention one item, that of cheese. During the term I have mentioned, the increased manufacture of cheese in Prince Edward Island has been 6,700 per cent. We have increased also in all the other lines of farm products-pork, bacon, ham, live stock, beef, sheep, eggs, butter, &c.-so that our trade to-day is very much larger than it was a few years ago, and consequently when the facilities for moving our products to the mainland come to a standstill, we suffer much more than we did. Not only has our trade in agricultural products largely increased, but we have established a large

trade in frozen fish with the cities of Boston and New York. During the past season, we sent several carloads to Georgetown to be exported in the usual way, hut we found we could not have them carried to the markets for which they were intended. They were held over at Georgetown several weeks, the warm season came on, and they had to be sold for the freight and carted out to the fields for manure. Not only witli regard to these products, but others as well, tens of thousands of dollars were lost by the people of Prince Edward Island, owing to our inability to export them during the winter. Trade was diverted from the island, merchants who had endeavoured to fill orders could not do so, the orders went to other places, and our people incurred great loss. The extent of that loss I am not in a position to measure at the present, but no doubt it was very severe, and it was not only a loss to the island, but also to the mainland. I have been told by the representatives from eastern Nova Scotia that the products which they generally expect to receive from Prince Edward Island advanced largely in price. In fact it was difficult to obtain them at all. Last winter was of course exceptionally severe, but the difficulties of winter navigation were increased by the mistakes made by the department here in Ottawa. The Department of Marine and Fisheries made some years ago, and particularly last year, the mistake of taking advice from too many people on how to conduct winter navigation, and largely in consequence of that the experiment proved a failure. At present there is a movement on foot at Prince Edward Island to have the management of this service placed in the hands of a local committee. I wish to enter my strongest protest against any such idea. I believe that we will not succeed in having a satisfactory winter service until the lion. Minister of Marine and Fisheries takes the management of this service immediately under his own control. There are two good men now in command of the winter boats. There is no better man in the service than Captain Finlayson, who has had twenty-five years experience, and Captain Brown, in charge of the ' Stanley,' was an experienced navigator before he took charge and has had five years' experience since then. I would, therefore, advise the hon. Minister of Marine and Fisheries to consult these captains if he requires any more information. There are no men better calculated to give advice. Let him also consult the records of the department, and then make up his mind to place those steamers where the records show they can do really practical work. I would advise him to leave a good deal to the responsibility and judgment of these two captains, and with their assistance and the assistance of the officials he has in the island, he will be able to so conduct the service that it will in future give reasonable and satisfactory results both in the island and the mainland.

There is another point which I wish to bring out. Last year there was some mismanagement in the railway service in connection with the winter service in the straits. Several times when the steamer arrived in Georgetown with a large quantity of mail and a large number of passengers, there was no special train to meet the steamer. Of course the steamer could not arrive on schedule time on account of having to meet adverse conditions, but in previous years there was always a special train to meet the steamer upon arrival. Last year, however, the arrangement was not carried out, and when the steamer arrived with mails and passengers, the train had gone and there would be no other for some twenty hours. The hon. members for West Queen's and and East Queen's, and, I think, the hon. member for one of the Prince's, had to put their hands into their pockets and deposit a sufficient amount to hire a special train in order to bring the mails and passengers to Charlottetown. That is a condition of affairs we never experienced before and which should not exist. On one occasion when a large number of passengers came to Georgetown-a sufficient number to warrant, undqr ordinary circumstances, -the1 railway department in running a special train-the local management declined to do so. The hon. member for West Queen's went to see the. superinten-tendent of the railway and offered to guarantee him against loss, provided the number of passengers were not sufficient to pay the ordinary railway fare, but still the superintendent refused, and my hon. colleague had to put up the whole of the money himself. On another occasion a number of commercial passengers arrived, they were several days late, the mails were late, and they wanted to get a train. It was necessary that the mails should be moved by a special train. But even under these circumstances the local management refused to provide a special train until one of the men deposited sufficient money, that is a dollar a mile for the number of miles the train had to go, some forty-six miles, and then they refused to carry the mails, and the mails had to remain over for another day. So great was the inconvenience and loss sustained by the people that the indignation expressed on every hand was something unprecedented in the history of that province.

Now. I cannot for a moment believe that the Minister of Railways or the minister of any other department would wish the officials of their departments to act in that way. I am sure they wish their officials to take into consideration difficulties of this kind as they arise, and to give the people the reasonable accommodation they have a right to call for. I trust that if an investigation has not already been held into this matter, that one will be held, and that no such acts as I have related here to-day will ever be allowed to take place again; I would suggest to the Minister of Marine and Fish-

eries that he take this matter into his consideration and make such arrangements as will put these boats, the 'Minto' and 'Stanley' in a first-class condition. It is now stated that the ' Stanley,' on account of her age and the rough usage she has endured for several years past, requires considerable repairs. If that is the case, I would suggest tc the Minister of Marine and Fisheries that he look into this matter duriag the summer, and that at the same time he examine the condition of the steamer ' Minto ' and put both these steamers in as good a condition as it is possible for him to do. I would suggest that he take the advice of the officers of those steamships, the officers of his own department, that he be guided by the experience of the last thirty years, and that at the close of the navigation of the summer season he place such boats on that route as thirty years' experience has shown to be necessary and practicable. I would also suggest that he give to the captains of those boats a larger measure of discretion, and that he hold the local officers of his department responsible for successfully carrying out that service, and if these men do not give the people satisfaction, that he put other men in their places. I would also suggest to the Minister of Railways that an arrangement be made by which a special train shall meet the winter steamers on their arrival, whether at Georgetown or Charlottetown, to carry the mails and passengers from the port to their destination on the Island. I think he should make such arrangements during this summer as will ensure a service fairly satisfactory to the people. If these arrangements are made during the coming summer, I believe that the service will be satisfactory. I hope, when the minister makes these arrangements, that he will not allow himself to be influenced in any way by the local advice he may receive.

Now, I object to a local board or a local committee having charge of these steamers, because, as I said before, the difficulties we have had to contend with last year will be intensified. Local influence and local prejudice will be brought to bear upon this board, and the service will not be satisfactorily carried out. We Prince Edward Islanders contend, and we have a right to contend, that the Dominion government should carry out the terms of union, the agreement stipulated at the time of confederation ; and if the government places the management of these steamers in charge of a local board or a local committee, the people will hold the government responsible for the non-fulfilment of the service and the bad management that will ensue. I think the departments in Ottawa should now be in possession of sufficient information to enable them to carry oat this service in a satisfactory manner, and if they do not do so. then we shall know where the responsibility lies. If the local officials are respon-Mr. HUGHES (King's P.E.I.).

sible for the trouble that arose last year, as I believe they were largely responsible, then the Ministers must look after their officials, and the people will look after the ministers. I hope and trust that we will not have a repetition of the trouble of last year, to the great annoyance and loss, not only to the people of Prince Edward Island, but to the people of the other provinces, particularly of Nova Scotia, with which we have so much business and personal intercourse. I have much pleasure, Sir, in moving the motion which stands in my name.

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
?

Mr. ED@

HACICETT (Prince West, P.E.I.) I want to say a few words on this very important matter. The question of the communication between Prince Edward Island and the mainland is no new question in this House : it has engaged the attention of this House from time to time since confederation. Since I have had the honour of representing a Prince Edward Island constituency in this House. I have endeavoured on several occasions to impress on hon. gentlemen occupying the treasury benches the great necessity of paying more attention to this matter than they have done in the past. The hon. gentleman from King's, P.E.I. (Mr. Hughes), in just speaking to his motion, has corroborated what I have stated heretofore, and it is not necessary for me to enter into details at the present time. But, Sir, he has made a statement this afternoon that condemns the present administration of Canada in relation to this matter. He says that the service last season was the worst since confederation. After all the advice that we have endeavoured to give these hon. gentlemen who occupy the treasury benches, and after all our endeavours to get them to do something tangible in the way of keeping up this communication, we have now a statement from the lips of one of their supporters who represents a constituency of Prince Edward Island, that the service during the past year was the worst since confederation. His statement strongly confirms other statements that have been made in this House before. I have been a little backward this session about raising the question, because so much has already been said in this House in regard to that matter, and I hoped the government would take action without any more urging. But since we have heard such a strong condemnation of the government from one of their own supporters, I think I am justified in referring to the subject once more.

The hon. gentleman has spoken of the great importance of this communication. We know that it is important, not only to the people living in the smallest, yet fairest, province of Canada, the province of Prince Edward Island, but to the people of all Canada from Vancouver to Sydney. I shall not repeat what the hon. gentleman has said about the terms of confed-

sel into the board ice so that it received the heavy impact of the ice coming down the strait, and so was frozen in. The pilot is accustomed to the conditions of the ice, and, if the captain disregards his pilot's advice, it is quite fair that he should be held responsible for his action. I have nothing to say with regard to the captains. I believe they are good men. The man who is in command of his ship is the one who is held responsible for the safety of ship and cargo. And I think it would be wrong to criticise the action or conduct of the captain.

Another thing the hon. gentleman referred to was the mail service. And, no doubt, he included in that the management of the service under the present Postmaster General, as well as the management of the steamships under the Minister of Marine and Fisheries. And what does the hon. gentleman tell us ? He tells us, after all these years of confederation for Prince Edward Island-and I can corroborate his statements, for I am aware of the facts-that the Postmaster General will not pay for a train to convey the mail from Georgetown or Summerside to Charlottetown. So the business-men must wait until a wedding or a funeral takes place and the parties engage a special train, or some noble minded man will come forward and deposit the amount to pay for running a special train.

This being the terrible state of affairs as regards the mails of Prince Edward Island, I most fully corroborate what has been said by the hon. gentleman in that respect. The citizens of Charlottetown, Souris, Summer-side, Alberton and Tignisli, and all over the province were deprived of their mails because of the penuriousness and meanness of the government, and especially the hon. Postmaster General in not providing a train to convey these mails to their destinations. In this respect the government have failed to carry out the terms of confederation guaranteed to us at the time of union. The hon. Minister of Railways and Canals would have readily granted that train if the hon. Postmaster General had been willing to pay for it. The hon. Minister of Railways and Canals has plenty of trains, he has numbers of men to operate the trains, and he would have performed the service, but the hon. Postmaster General was so penurious that he would not pay $20 to convey these mails from Georgetown or Summerside to Charlottetown, and thus they had to remain over for twenty-four hours until the regular trains were run. Coming on towards the end of the season, when the people all over Prince Edward Island became indignant, because this is not a matter of Liberals or Conservatives, but the indignation was general all over the province, a gentleman was sent down from Ottawa who remained there for a few days. As soon as he arrived at Charlottetown he telegraphed to Ottawa and Mr. HACKETT.

a special train was provided. Although the season had almost passed, although the time of the greatest difficulty, the time when the people suffered most from the want of their mails had almost passed, when navigation was in sight, a train was put on to convey these mails. I fully agree with what the hon. member for King's has gaid in connection with the matter. As I said before it is not my intention on this occasion to speak on the subject. For the last two years I have endeavoured to bring the matter to the attention of the House to the best of my ability. I now speak because of the motion of the hon. gentleman and I am pleased to think, that, after the third session of parliament since 1600, we have a supporter of the government from the province of Prince Edward Island corroborating every word I said here during the past three years and condemning the government in stronger language than I can condemn it in connection with this matter.

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
CON

Adam Carr Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. A. C. BELL (Pictou).

Mr. Speaker, I would like to say a few words on this subject, because I do not think it is well that the House should get the impression that this is altogether a matter that affects tlie province of Prince Edward Island or that it is a matter in respect to which the members of this House from the other provinces of Canada have any feeling of indifference. I would like to say a few words from the knowledge I have, living as I do upon the Nova Scotia side of the strait, and being interested in the maintenance of the service, to corroborate all that has been said by the representatives of Prince Edward Island who have been heard here to-day. I am aware that successive governments have been charged by the citizens of Prince Edward Island with failing to carry out one of the very important provisions of the Act of Union between that province and the older parts of Canada, and I know perfectly well that successive governments have endeavoured to give a satisfactory service across the strait. I think, from the local knowledge I have of the situation, that they have now succeeded in providing a service by twTo steamers which is as good as anything that could be provided, short of tunnel service of which the hon. member for Prince West (Mr. Hackett) has just spoken, and which would be the complete and final solution of this difficulty that affects the people of Prince Edward Island. The tunnel question has not been heard of for a long time in practical politics : nevertheless, I

have a strong impression that some day or other it will again come to the front and at a time when the greatly increased facilities for excavating tunnels and the advantage of cheap money will render the scheme a feasible one. We might expect to see the government of Canada in the position, if the rate of interest should continue to fall as it has been doing for a long time, of being able to undertake to give Prince Edward

Island connection with the mainland by means of a tunnel. It would not be a very bad financial operation. The cost can be easily ascertained and in consequence of the great improvement that has taken place in the method of excavating tunnels and of the cheapening of money, the cost is something that is diminishing every day.

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
?

The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

Is there an estimate of the cost ?

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
CON
?

The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

What is the amount of the estimate V

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
CON

Adam Carr Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL.

I think about $14,000,000 ; there were two or three estimates for tunnels of various sizes, but the one that would give a satisfactory passage to a modern locomotive would cost somewhere in the neighbourhood of $14,000,000.

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
?

The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

What is the length of it ?

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
CON

Adam Carr Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL.

Nine miles. It is becoming every day more and more feasible. As far as the length of the tunnel is concerned, it is not unprecedented. At this moment, in Europe, a tunnel is nearing completion which is eleven miles in length, and it seems to have been constructed with comparative ease and with comparative absence of loss of life to the men employed. I think that the investigations made at the time that that question was to the front showed that the stratum through which the tunnel would be excavated would admit of comparatively easy work. I do not think that the government is prepared to consider at this moment a tunnel seriously, but they have, in my opinion, in steamship communication, the means of connecting almost perfectly Prince Edward Island and the mainland if the service be handled in a satisfactory manner. But, in the course of the past winter, the hon. member for King's, P.E.I. (Mr. Hughes) informs us, that we have had the worst service we have ever had since confederation. I do not think he is altogether right in that respect, because, during some of the years since confederation, people were confined to the old-fashioned mode of reaching the mainland, by tbe primitive ice-boat. Still, as steam communication has been adopted, I presume he meant to say that more difficulty has occurred in relation to steam communication during the past winter than in any other year. That is entirely owing to one circumstance. If no attempt had been made to keep up communication between Summerside and Cape Tormentine or, if that attempt had been abandoned when the increasing severity of the winter made it hazardous and the communication maintained entirely between Pictou and Georgetown by the two boats, giving every facility for passenger and freight communication, would have been in constant operation during the whole of the winter. It would not be fail' to condemn the service simply because the experiment tried in response to the representations from a very important section of Prince Edward Island resulted in imprisoning one of the steamers in the ice floe, and because the attempt of one of the other steamers to get out of that difficulty resulted in breaking her propellor and the second steamer was ineapaciated, thus nullifying the whole of the service for several weeks. Instead of diminishing the communication by the established route which time has proven to be a safe and satisfactory one, an experiment was made involving one of the steamers, imprisoning her in 'the ice and making her absolutely useless for the purpose for which she was placed in the service. The matter is perfectly obvious to any person acquainted with the conditions there that while Charlottetown and Summer-side are the most important points, and while mail communication must be kept up uninterruptedly in the summer season when winter comes the conditions change and if there is to be a regular communication between Pictou and the mainland that communication must pass via Pictou and Georgetown. That has been satisfactorily and conclusively proven by the experience of the years in which our race has inhabited this country. I would not altogether go so far as to condemn the government for having yielded to the request of the people of the western part of the island to try the experiment, but I think they lutve sufficient warning in the experience of the past winter to prevent them from resorting to that experiment in the future. If they do adhere to the winter service route between Pictou and Georgetown with two such steamers as the ' Stanley ' and the ' Minto,' we can count on having regular communication between Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia in the winter season. It is true that this has been a severe winter; still, not so severe as some others I can recollect in my own life. It has been a severe winter, and yet I am quite satisfied it was not the severity of the winter which interrupted the communication-it was the fact of having sent the ' Stanley ' to run into the port of Summerside where she was caught under unfavourable conditions and that accident resulted not only in losing her service to the country, but also the loss of the service of the steamer ' Minto ' as well. There are reasons why it would be very agreeable to people living in Prince Edward Island that communication should be kept up with Charlottetown and Summer-side direct, but it is impossible to do that in winter with any facilities that could be commanded by the government, no tuatter what the expenditure of the government might be in the shape of steamers or ice breakers. Across the mouth of these ports where the water is shallow the drifting ice gets in and under pressure of great

weight there is a solid wall of ice formed through which nothing that floats can make its way. On the other hand the port of Georgetown is always accessible and the port of Pictou is comparatively accessible as well. If the government find itself, with means at their disposal to keep open a communication which is feasible and which has been proved in the past to be feasible, I do not think that the same Interruption of commerce will result in any future winter. It is very deplorable, and every one regrets it, that our friends of Prince Edward Island have been subjected to such great loss, and one of the reasons for speaking to-day is to show that we in Nova Scotia have a great feeling of sympathy for our friends and brothers in Prince Edward Island and would like the government of Canada to do everything in their power to satisfactorily fulfil the terms of the Act of Confederation. There is one suggestion which I would make, and it is merely a suggestion. We have heard a good deal in the course of the discussion to-day from the two lion, gentlemen who have spoken, about the defectiveness of the railway service in Prince Edward Island, to the effect that trains were not ready at the moment the boats arrived to take the passengers and mails and freight.. We have heard a good deal of censure applied to the lion. Postmaster General. No doubt he deserves a good deal of it and he is fortunately of sufficient stature and breadth of shoulder to bear his burden without feeling much affected by it. But it does strike me that the chief ground of complaint is, that there is some defect in the history of the organization of the whole of this service. These boats are run under the Department of Marine and Fisheries. Why should not this steamer service be treated as the service across the Straits of Canso, and these boats be regarded simply as a ferry; a portion of the Intercolonial railway; a part of the service connecting the Intercolonial railway with the government railway on Prince Edward Island. If such were the case you would have concerted action and there would be no excuse whatever for failure on the part of the railway controlling these boats to serve them at every landing place with trains and afford every facility for moving passengers and freight. Were that done it would give to the control of the service a large and competent staff of officials who are at Moncton and at Truro and Pictou. The railway men under the officers of the Department of the Minister of Railways and Canals are perfectly conversant with the conditions of weather, and to my mind they would much more satisfactorily and effectively control and regulate the movements of these boats than they will ever be controlled and regulated as long as they are under a department which has not any direct connection with the great system of railways which must serve to feed these

boats, and which these boats must always serve in the capacity of ferries. I do not conceive for my part that the greater distance between Pictou and Georgetown, or Summerside or Cape Tormentine constitute any reason why these boats should not be regarded as ferry boats, and as a portion of the government system of railways just as are the ferry boats which to-day are carrying the traffic of the Intercolonial railway across the Strait of Canso. There are tremendous difficulties also at Canso and this last winter in order to overcome these difficulties, under the management of my friend the Minister of Railways and Canals, a special manager to take complete charge of the ferryage across that strait was put in charge, and the result has been very great efficiency. As every one who has travelled that route knows there are tremendous difficulties of ice and tide to be encountered in the Strait of Canso just as well as in the Straits of Northumberland. I would suggest that this matter be taken into careful consideration and it may be that the result will show that the concentration of the management of the whole service in one hand will result in giving far greater efficiency.

If there be any doubt in the mind of the department that now controls or that will hereafter control these boats as to the proper points for them to make in Nova Scotia or New' Brunswick, all they have to do is to consult the experienced captains, pilots, and coasters; those whose business requires them to navigate these waters ; to be satisfied at once and for ever that the proper points between which these boats should play, are, after the hard part of the winter comes, Georgetown! and Pictou. Up to the end of the year, and perhaps in the month of January the water is so free from ice that even if there would be a somewhat great degree of frost there is no difficulty whatever in keeping up the navigation because at that time the water is perfectly clear and open as it is in summer. But w'hen we have entered upon a new year-

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS.

It was in January that the * Stanley ' was caught in the ice.

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink
CON

Adam Carr Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL.

It may be the first part of January but sometimes the whole month of January is free from ice. It is after we enter the month of January that the trouble comes. In the months of January and February we experience the great difficulties of that navigation.

Topic:   P.E.I.-WINTER COMMUNICATION.
Permalink

April 6, 1903