April 1, 1903

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The MINISTER OF CUSTOMS (Hon. Wm. Paterson) :

1. The following articles used as materials in Canadian manufactures have been transferred to the free list by Orders in Council since 1st January, 1902 :

Materials which enter into the construction and form part of cream separators when imported by manufacturers of cream separators to be used in their own factories for the manufacture of cream separators, until otherwise ordered.

Hemp bleaching compound when imported by manufacturers of rope, to be used in their own factories for the manufacture of rope, until otherwise provided.

Silver tubing, when imported by manufacturers of silverware to be used in their own factories in the manufacture of silverware.

Steel for the manufacture of cutlery when imported by manufacturers of cutlery to be used in their own factories in the manufacture of such articles.

Yarn of jute, flax or hemp for the manufacture of towels when imported by the manufacturers of jute, linen or union towels, to be used in their own factories in the manufacture of such articles.

Malleable iron or steel castings, in the rough, for the manufacture of scissors and hand shears, when imported by manufacturers of scissors and hand shears to be used in making such articles in their own factories.

Refined cotton seed oil (edible) for canning fish, until otherwise provided.

Bleached palm oil shea butter when for use ' as materials in Canadian manufactures.

2. His Excellency the Governor General, by and with the advice of the King's Privy Council for Canada, has been pleased, under the provisions of subsection 3, of section 16 of the Customs Tariff, 1897, to reduce the customs duty on news printing paper in sheets and rolls, including all printing paper valued at not more than two and one-quarter cents per pound, from twenty-five per centum ad valorem to fifteen per centum ad valorem.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FREE LIST OR LOWERED DUTY.
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INSOLVENT ACT.

CON

Mr. LENNOX asked :

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is it the intention of the government to introduce an Insolvent Act at the present session of parliament ?

2. Has it been represented to the_ government that the enactment of a Dominion Insolvent Act would promote trade between Canada and the other parts of the empire ?

3. Has it been brought to the notice of the government that at a conference of all the boards of trade of the Dominion of Canad", held in Toronto, on the fourth, fifth and sixth of June, 1902, the following resolution was unanimously passed, viz.:-'Whereas trade is seriously handicapped by the difference of the provisions of the law in the different provinces, applying to assignments for the benefits of creditors, by insolvent debtors, and the uncertainty as to the security offered in business transactions, by the absence of an insolvency law in the Dominion. And whereas it is important that the Dominion parliament should enact an insolvency law at the earliest possible date, whereby that confidence which is necessary for the promotion of commerce between the different provinces, and with the outside world, be established;-Resolved, that the Dominion government be requested to assemble one or more commercial representatives of the various provinces and the territories, say in Ottawa, for the purpose of assisting in framing an Act, having for its basis the control and management of insolvent estates by the interested creditors, with the legal expenses reduced to a minimum.'

4. Have the government availed themselves of the assistance of such commercial representatives of the various provinces ? And if not, why not ?

5. Have the government replied to the proposal of said resolution ; and if so, in what way, and to what effect ?

6. What action, if any, have the government taken in the matter ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INSOLVENT ACT.
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The PRIME MINISTER (Rt. Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier).

It is not the intention of the government to introduce an insolvency bill during the present session of parliament. Numerous representations have been made in the direction indicated in the question, but the government does not consider the time opportune, this session, to introduce such a measure.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INSOLVENT ACT.
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POSTMASTER, BLOOMFIELD, N.B.

CON

George William Fowler

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOWLER asked :

Has any change of postmaster been made at the post office at Bloomfield station, King's County, N.B., or is any change now in com-templation 1 If so, who is to be the new incumbent ; and by whose recommendation is the change made, or to be made ? What, if any, charge has been preferred against the postmaster who has lately been removed, or who is to be removed, if the removal is not yet accomplished ? By whom has such charge, if any, been preferred ? Has any investigation been held respecting the said Bloomfield post office ? Was there any petition, signed by residents of

Bloomfield, asking for such changes ? If so, by how many persons was said petition signed ?

The POSTMASTER GENERAL/ (Hon. Sir Wm. Mulock). The answer to the first question is, a change has been made. To tlie first part of the second question, B. C. Williams. To the latter part of the second question, I would say that it is not usual to state on whose recommendation appointments are made. In answer to the fourth question, there was no charge preferred. 'This answers the fifth and sixth. There was no petition.

Topic:   POSTMASTER, BLOOMFIELD, N.B.
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INDIAN AGENTS AS GUARDIANS.

CON

David Tisdale

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. TISDALE asked :

Are the government agents in charge of Indian reservations, in the province of Ontario, appointed guardians or agents by the government of individual Indians, living on such reservations: or of the money, property or effects of such Indians ? Are such government agents permitted to act as such guardians or agents ?

Topic:   INDIAN AGENTS AS GUARDIANS.
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The POSTMASTER GENERAL (Hon. Sir Wm. Mulock).

Under the provisions of the Indian Act, Indian agents may be appointed by the Superintendent General, guardians of the persons and property of minor Indians ; but such agents are not ex-officio the guardians or agents of individual Indians.

Topic:   INDIAN AGENTS AS GUARDIANS.
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BANKERS ASSOCIATION'S INSPECTION OF BANKS.

L-C

Mr. INGRAM asked :

Liberal-Conservative

1. What is the nature of the inspection of Canadian chartered banks, by the Canadian Bankers Association ?

2. At what dates do such inspections take place ?

3. Does the inspection involve a thorough examination of the assets and liabilities of the various banks, as well as of the securities upon which their loans are held ?

4. Is the report of the inspector communicated from time to time to the government ?

5. Do such reports indicate whether the loans are made to Canadian borrowers, or to persons residing or carrying on business in other countries ?

6. Has the government any information as to the amounts loaned by Canadian banks in the cities^ of New York and Boston, upon the security of stocks of incorporated companies ?

Topic:   BANKERS ASSOCIATION'S INSPECTION OF BANKS.
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The MINISTER OF FINANCE (Hon. W. S. Fielding).

Replying to questions 1 to 4, whatever inspection takes place is a matter of voluntary arrangement among the members of the Bankers Association, and the government have nothing to do with it. Replying to questions 5 and 6, the government have no information respecting the loans of Canadian banks beyond what is published in the usual returns in the Canada ' Gazette.'

Topic:   BANKERS ASSOCIATION'S INSPECTION OF BANKS.
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MANITOBA AND NORTH-WEST VOLUNTEERS-LAND SCRIP.

LIB

Thomas Walter Scott

Liberal

Mr. SCOTT asked :

Does the government intend to ask parliament to make a grant of land scrip to Manitoba and North-west volunteers who served under arms in South Africa ?

Topic:   MANITOBA AND NORTH-WEST VOLUNTEERS-LAND SCRIP.
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The MINISTER OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE (Hon. Sir Frederick Borden).

The government does not intend to ask parliament to make a grant of land to the North-west volunteers who served under arms.

Topic:   MANITOBA AND NORTH-WEST VOLUNTEERS-LAND SCRIP.
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PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTES.

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Robert Bickerdike

Mr. ROBERT BICKERDIKE (St. Lawrence, Montreal) moved :

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That the object of good government is to promote the general welfare of the people by a careful encouragement and protection of whatever makes for the public good ; and by equally careful discouragement and suppression of whatever tends to the public disadvantage.

That the smoking of cigarettes has been proved by overwhelming testimony to be productive of serious physical and moral injury to young people; imparing health, arresting development, weakening intellectual power, and thus constituting a social and national evil.

The legislation licensing and restricting the sale of cigarettes has not proven sufficient to prevent these evils, which will continue while the public sale of the cause of the mischief is permitted to go on.

That this House is of the opinion, for the reasons hereinbefore set forth, that the right and most effectual legislative remedy for these evils is to be found in the enactment and enforcement of a law prohibiting the importation, manufacture, and sale of cigarettes.

He said : In rising to move this resolution, which is seconded by the hon. member for West Huron (Mr. Holmes), I cannot but feel that the motion would have been much better taken care of if placed in the hands of one of the eloquent members of this House. I shall only lay before the House a few of the many facts that have come into my possession to show the baneful effect of cigarette smoking upon the boys of this country. I believe that if the injury that is being done were known, there would be a unanimous vote of this House in favour of this resolution or of some similar measure. I hope I shall have the majority of this House at my back, for there are very few men who are fathers of boys but have had more or less cause to know the bad effects of this cigarette habit upon boys.

There is no young man or boy but wishes to succeed in life. All want to get along ; all want to better their position. Success in life, in these days of strong competition, means honesty, industry, temperance and economy. A boy or young man who has these, with good health, must succeed ; while, if he lacks them even moderate suc-

Topic:   PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTES.
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CON

George William Fowler

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOWLER.

cess will be impossible. I think, Sir, we are all agreed that the boy who is addicted to the cigarette babit cannot succeed in this country unless he has a very strong ' pull ' somewhere, while the boy who is not addicted to that habit does not require any ' pull,'-all he wants is the push, and he succeeds in getting to the front. I have with me certificates from most eminent physicians, throughout the country, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and all these documents go to prove that the cigarette habit, with the boys at least, is very, very injurious. I think there is no hon. member in this House who will say nay to that proposition. I would be the last man on the floor to attempt to interfere in any way with the rights of the subject. Once a boy has come to the age of maturity, he has a right to do as he pleases. All X wish to do is to introduce some measure that will protect the boys from this very bad habit of recent years-for, Mr. Speaker, it is only of recent years that it has taken such a hold on the country. The most eminent physicians pronounce cigarettes worse for boys than pipes or cigars, and paper cigarettes worse than all tobacco cigarettes-1 suppose because it absorbs more nicotine. This pernicious habit leads to nervousness, and if continued long enough, results in insanity. Scores of boys, Mr. Speaker, are in the insane asylum in consequence of this habit, and even a greater number have been killed outright.

1 would like to draw the attention of this House to what is being done in the United States. The plague invaded that land many years ago, but it is only recently that it has attained a strong hold in the Dominion. In forty-two states of the Union they have enacted anti-cigarette laws. Many states have passed prohibitory or restrictive laws. In 1899 a wave of education produced by attempts to secure legislation passed over the whole United States, and as a result more than one billion less cigarettes were sold in 1899 than in 1898. That was due not only to the legislation but to the fact that a great many prominent business houses in the United States, and a number of large railways, absolutely refused and still refuse to employ a boy under eighteen years of age who smokes cigarettes. They all recognize that a cigarette fiend is no use in any business establishment. To show what methods have been employed let me read the following :

Two states, Nevada and Montana, have cigarette license laws ; the first is with, and the second without an age limit. One state forbids sale of cigarettes to those under 14 years of age ; another to those under 15. Sixteen states forbid sale under 16 years of age ; one under 17. The Indiana, Iowa, Georgia, North Dakota, South Carolina and Wyoming laws prohibit sale to ' minors '; while Maine, Nebraska, Nevada and Wisconsin put the prohibited limit at 21. Florida rules out the sale altogether, except under certain specified circumstances. Massachusets prohibits sale and manufacture, and Tennessee, which has no manufactories within its borders, caps the legislative climax by putting its bar upon sale and importation.

Now, Sir, if it has been found necessary iu the United States to enact laws in so many states to protect their boys, why should not the Dominion of Canada enact a similar law ? Not only are the legislatures all over the union moving in this matter, but as I said before, a great many large business houses refuse to employ boys who use cigarettes. The cigarette habit is a recent form of intemperance that is proving itself so destructive to bodily strength, mental keenness and moral character, that our educators, our business men, and our public officials, are declaring that their doors must be closed against eigarette boys.

Now, I would like to read to this House a few of the names of institutions, factories and railroads in the United States who will not employ boys who smoke cigarettes. I have several hundred names, but I will only read a few, for I am well aware that a good many hon. members desire to speak on this subject, and I do not wish to take up too much time.

The athletic clubs of the United States; several business colleges; the Union Pacific Railroad; the Omaha schools; Swift & Co., the largest packing house in the world will not employ a boy now who smokes cigarettes ; Marshall Field, dry goods, Chicago ; several life insurance companies; the Lehigh Valley Railroad. Boys who use cigarettes are debarred from the United States army and naval schools. Carson, Pirie & Scott, Chicago, close their doors against cigarette users; so do the Chicago Rock Island and Pacific Railroad, the Central Railroad, Georgia; three high schools in Chicago; Ayer's Sarsparilla Co., Chicago; Wana-maker's, Philadelphia, one of the largest stores in the United States will not allow a single boy to be engaged in their employment if he smokes cigarettes; Morgan & Wright Tire Co., Chicago; The Western Union Telegraph Co., the messenger service; the Burlington Railroad; the United States Weather Bureau; Heath & Milligan; Montgomery Ward & Co., Academy of Northwestern University, Chicago; Telephone Co., Cumberland; the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; the Pittsburg and AVestern Railroad, the West Superior Railroad, Wisconsin.

All these railroads have found it necessary to instruct their managers that they must no longer employ cigarette smokers. The same may be said of school inspectors. I have letters here from most of the prominent medical men in the Dominion, all condemning the use of cigarettes by boys. I will mention a few of the names. Dr. Isaac Wood of Kingston, Dr. Lambly of Cooksliire, Quebec, Dr. Stewart of Prescott. Dr. Macpherson of Prescott, Dr. James Stewart, lecturer in McGill University and head of the medical staff of the Royal Victoria hospital, Dr. Blackadar, head of the staff of the general hospital. All these medical gentlemen are unanimous in con-

derailing the use of cigarettes. I have letters from nearly one hundred of them to that effect. Last, but not least, I had a communication from the late Dr. Christie, during his lifetime, who was for twenty years an honoured member of this House, and was one of the strongest opponents of the use of cigarettes by boys.

X do not know of any argument that can be urged in favour off this habit, although I presume a number will be urged here this afternoon. The great danger is that the editors of newspapers may take a wrong course on this matter. Heretofore many of the papers have been very generous in commenting editorially in favour of the movement against cigarettes. But now I notice that in some of them are appearing long articles stating that cigarettes are quite harmless, and really nourishing and beneficial. Of course there is no hint that these ai tides are advertisements, and that the Space is paid for, probably by some one interested in the tobacco trust. One of the editors being asked about it, answered: Well, we get higher rates than we do for ordinary advertising matter. I would say also that school inspectors have done much to discourage the cigarette habit among school children. I must not forget to mention that Sir Wm. Hingston, of Montreal, Senator, is one of those who have come out very strongly in favour of this measure. I might mention other distinguished names, but X do not wish to take up too much time.

Now, I will give a few figures taken from the Blue-books of the Department of Inland Revenue. In 1898 there were 80,562,817 cigarettes manufactured in Canada and taken out of bond for consumption; in 1899, there were 101,143,328; in 1900, there were 116,061,522.

Now, I would like to call the attention of the Postmaster General to what is being done by the post office authorities in Chicago :

At a conference of the Chicago post office authorities it was decided to hereafter employ no boy who smokes cigarettes or who is known to have been addicted to the habit.

Heretofore there has been a rule in force that boys employed by the office could not smoke while working, but, believing that smoking has a demoralizing effect, and because of the need of the most intelligent and active boys, it is thought wise to make closer restrictions.

An examination is soon to be held, when 700 youths will enter into competition for position in the post office, and the new order will have no small effect upon so large a number of applicants.

The clause relating to cigarettes says : ' No small boys will be allowed to participate in the examination, since only the best-equipped boys, mentally and physically, are wanted in this service, and under no circumstances wall a boy who smokes cigarettes be employed.' The service referred to is that of special delivery messengers, for which appointments are made from this examination.

Topic:   PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTES.
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Robert Bickerdike

Mr. BICEERDIKE.

There Is just one more fact that I would like to lay before the House before taking my seat and it is this : It Is a very startling statement and one that perhaps a great many hon. members will have doubt about but It is from a good authority. When I give the name of my authority I am sure that hon. gentlemen will all be satisfied that the statement is a bona fide one. A very startling suggestion was made in the English parliament as to why the United States beat Spain.

Why did the United States beat Spain ? ft has been left, says the * Westminster Gazette,' for Sir Brampton Gurdon, in his speech on the finance Bill, to supply the answer : ' The evil effect of the growing habit among boys of smoking filthy cigarettes could scarcely be exaggerated. Without doubt it was a habit which left the rising generation deteriorated in physique, and the result of such indulgence could be found in the miserable failure of the Spanish forces in their war with the United States.'

I do not tliink it is necessary to say anything more. I have laid the facts before the House and I am sure that a great many hon. members on both sides will stand up for this Bill, and I am sure that all will be proud of their action who cast a vote to exterminate the cigarette habit amongst our young boys. I will now leave the matter in the hands of my seconder, the hon. member for West Huron (Mr. Holmes).

Topic:   PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTES.
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LIB

Robert Holmes

Liberal

Mr. R. HOLMES (West Huron).

In seconding this resolution, Mr. Speaker, I desire to call the attention of yourself and through you the attention of the House to certain facts as bearing upon the question and to supplement, as far as lies in my power, the information that has been given to the House by the hon. member for Montreal, St. Lawrence (Mr. Bickerdike). I think it will be conceded at once that we are endeavouring to deal with an evil that is of growing proportions. We hear the argument advanced everywhere that this is an evil that should be stopped if possible, but the problem of dealing with or restricting the evil is apparently one that seems insurmountable. The various provincial legislatures have recognized the evil to the extent that they have placed restrictions upon the sale of cigarettes or the use of cigarettes up to a certain age, and while that legislation is restrictive to the extent of its powers it does not go far enough in order to cope with the evil because it does not prohibit the actual use of the cigarette. Therefore, we realize the necessity of some more stringent legislation that will put a stop to the evil that is assuming very large and very serious proportions. The mover of the resolution states clearly at the outset that the intention is to reach the young, so far as it is possible to reach those who are of immature years, those who have not attained their full physical development, those upon whom the evil effects of cigarette smoking are perhaps more apparent than they are on people of more mature years. In this

connection a point to be borne in mind is tliat while we are endeavouring to reach the young we can only reach the young by reaching the old. We have no quarrel with those of mature years who smoke cigarettes or use tobacco under other circumstances, but when we are trying to reach the young we must also have legislation in connection with the old. The hon. member for Montreal, St. Lawrence, has quoted some figures from the Inland Revenue Department to show the increased consumption of cigarettes. Let me go a little farther than he went in that connection and show you that there are a great many more cigarettes smoked at present than there were a few years ago. He quoted the figures of 1900, which show.ed that 116,000,000 cigarettes were taken out for consumption in the Dominion of Canada. In 1901 the quantity had gone up to 121,000,000, while in 1902, the last year, it had increased to the enormous number of 134,000,000. In addition to that we find by the trade and navigation returns that, the importation of cigarettes from other countries in 1901 amounted to 4,000,000, while, in 1902, the importation had increased to nearly 8,000,000, which is quite sufficient proof that the use of cigarettes is going on at a very alarming rate.

Topic:   PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTES.
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April 1, 1903