May 14, 1902

?

The MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES.

My hon. friend is mistaken. In the first place the arrangement .made between the Commissioner of Customs and the manufacturer sets forth just what pieces are required. Practically the whole gun is made in Canada. There are a few small pieces, easily designated, in regard to which it is very simple to know just how many of them are used, and would be entitled to come in free. Supposing they manufactured 10,000 rifles for the government, the customs would know that only 10,000 of these articles, or sets of articles, used in those rifles would be entitled to come in free. I do not think there will be any difficulty in working it out. I was on the committee examining the matter, and we found it was only a few small articles that we have not yet perfected in this country, that will have to be imported from foreign countries.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

The hon. member for Lanark (Mr. Haggart) is perfectly correct in what he stated with, regard to the effect of this resolution. He said, as I understood him, that it is quite competent for the manufacturers to merely assemble everything, importing all the materials from abroad.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES.

If there was not a contract, it might be possiible; but the contract specifies what is to be done.

Mi-. BORDEN (Halifax). The contract has nothing to do with this resolution. My hon. friend from Lanark was not dealing with any contract, -but with what is before the House; and he is absolutely correct in bis statement as to the effect of this resolution.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES.

Theoretically, yes.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

The English language could not be plainer :

All materials or parts in the rough, unfinished and finished, screws, nuts, bands 'and springs, to be used in rifles to be manufactured at any such factory for the government of Canada.

You could not get a more comprehensive statement than that by employing any language. Of course, it is to be done under regulations made by the Minister of Customs, which may afford some safeguard; but apart from that, it is certainly open to the very grave objection which the hon. member for Lanark has suggested.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF FINANCE.

My hon. friend has perhaps not observed the distinction drawn in subsection ' b' between the rough materials and the finished materials. If he reads it again, he will see that while they are at liberty to import rough and unfinished materials generally, the finished articles which they import are limited to screws, nuts, bands and springs. Then there is the general proviso that the Minister of Customs must make the regulations.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

The whole of what the hon. minister states depends on the punctuation marks, which are not generally taken into consideration by the courts. There might be a very strong argument made to prove that it means exactly what the hon. member for Lanark says. These punctuation marks, though regarded as important by many people, have practically no effect in determining the meaning of language in a court of law.

The MINISTER OF FINANCE, I do not think the meaning depends on the punctuation. I think the language itself is very clear. Before the resolution is disposed of, I wish to ask the attention of the committee to another item which is not included in it, but about which I do not imagine there will be any difference. There is a provision in the tariff for the admission free of duty of certain machinery for mining operations and for blast furnaces and operations of that character. Under this provision we have allowed coke-making machinery to come in free of duty. There Is certain machinery which is used in common for the manufacture of coke and the manufacture of charcoal, and the department has held that the provision might reasonably include machinery for the manufacture of charcoal. About the only difference

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. FIELDING.

49 7S

is that coke is made from coal, while charcoal is made from wood. The department lias so interpreted the provision ; but the Minister of Customs has called my attention to the matter, and he thinks it advisable that there should be a clear definition in the tariff in accordance with what has been the interpretation of the department. I propose, therefore, to add to the item as clause ' c ' ' charcoal-making machinery.'

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. HAGGART.

Will it have an ex poste facto effect ?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF FINANCE.

The Customs Department having hitherto interpreted in this way, I suppose in that respect it has an ex poste facto effect. But the Minister of Customs desires that it should be made a matter of tariff instead of a matter of departmental regulation.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

There is no objection to that so long as there is no discrimination.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF FINANCE.

None whatever.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink

Amendment agreed to, and resolution as amended agreed to. Resolution reported, read the first time and the second time and agreed to. The MINISTER OF FINANCE moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 169) to amend the Customs Tariff, 1897. He said : this is simply a transcript of the resolution which we have already agreed to. Motion agreed to, Bill read the first time and the second time, considered in committee, and reported. The MINISTER OF FINANCE moved the third reading of the Bill.


CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

Before the Bill finally passes, we shall expect the government, by means of customs regulations which are referred to in the Bill, to use proper safeguards so that the danger pointed out by my hon. friend from Lanark (Mr. Haggart) shall not be realised.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF FINANCE.

I entirely concur in the suggestion of my hon. friend. The Customs Department must be instructed to look carefully into the matter.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

Why does this change date from the 17th March ?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink
?

The MINISTER OF FINANCE.

All tariff changes date from the date of the budget.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-AID TO RAILWAYS.
Permalink

Motion agreed to, Bill read the third time, and passed.


SUPPLY-THE TREADGOLD CONCESSION.


The MINISTER OF FINANCE (Hon. W. S. Fielding) moved that the House again go into Committee of Supply.


May 14, 1902