May 9, 1902

LIB

Thomas Walter Scott

Liberal

Mr. SCOTT.

This particular clause has no reference to the distribution of cars so much as it is to make provision that the cars shall be furnished to farmers at all points-not only where there are loading platforms, but at other points.

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The MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR.

This clause lays down the principle that the farmer is entitled to get his share of cars. The company canfaot say, ' we are only bound to furnish cars where there is a warehouse or an elevator.' We settled that question by this clause.

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CON

Nathaniel Boyd

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYD.

I have no desire to hamper the railway companies in doing business. But the minister has asked me if I would

suggest something that would be more effective. I could very soon do it, but it is a question whether it would be exactly fair to the railway companies. For instance, if a farmer keeps a car for a certain time and does not load it he has to pay for the car. If, ou the other hand, you provide that when the farmer demands a car within a certain time the company shall pay if they do not furnish it within that time, you wiil get over the difficulty. But for my part,

1 suppose we may be satisfied in the meantime to see how the railway companies are prepared to meet the provisions of the Act so far as we have gone and deal with them later on if they do not do so.

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The MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.

I think that would be the wiser course. This Act will, I think, be up for revision next year, and in the meantime we shall have an opportunity of seeing how it will work.

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CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. HAGGART.

You are proposing to extend the powTer of the commissioner to put up loading platforms wherever he chooses. He should not have that power at all. I would suggest that they be put either at a station or at a siding.

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Fred Langdon Davis

Mr. DAYIS.

I think that should be left in the hands of the commissioner who is on the ground and knows the conditions. There are places where there is plenty of grain, but where there is not a siding for a distance of twenty miles.

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The MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.

I move the addition to section

2 of the words ' and where there is no station yard at such siding as the commissioner may prescribe.'

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Amendment agreed to, and section as amended agreed to. On section 8,


CON

Nathaniel Boyd

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYD.

I beg to submit the following amendment: On the second line between the words ' agent ' and ' and ' that the following words be inserted. ' Tnere shall be a suitable blackboard, upon which the prices of all grains offered for sale under this Act shall be plainly written daily at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.' [DOT]

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Fred Langdon Davis

Mr. DAYIS.

Who will do this work-the railway company or the government ?

Topic:   MANITOBA GRAIN ACT AMENDMENT.
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CON
LIB

James Moffat Douglas

Liberal

Mr. DOUGLAS.

Provision is made in the Act to provide papers giving the prices in Liverpool and other points, and also Chicago and Minneapolis, to be seen every day in Winnipeg, so that the suggestion of the hon. member for Macdonald is simply to carry this forward from Winnipeg to outlying stations.

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The MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.

There are nearly a thousand such

stations, and this might be a very considerable tax on the Inspection Act, which is hardly equal to the requirements made on it, as it stands. I would like a little time to consider that amendment, and I hope, when we come to the third reading, to be able to give an answer. There is no limit to the time in the amendment, and to supply for several months prices' twice a day to a thousand stations might involve much greater i expense than the hon. gentleman contemplates. I suppose his intention is that these prices shall be supplied by the Canadian Pacific Telegraph Company, which is tne only company that has communication with all these stations. From my own experience, I should say that to supply twice a day to a thousand places by telegraph the prices of all kinds of wheat offered for sale under this Act, might involve a very considerable charge. Judging from my own experience, I should say that to supply, twice a day, telegraphic statements to a thousand places of the price of all the grades of wheat offered for sale under this Act might involve a very considerable charge. It might run into a great many thousand dollars.

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Fred Langdon Davis

Mr. DAYIS.

And what about the ease of places where they load from the platform ?

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CON

Nathaniel Boyd

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYD.

Of course, where there is no telegraph, it cannot be done.

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LIB

Thomas Osborne Davis

Liberal

Mr. DAVIS.

Then, one portion of the community would be protected and the other not.

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CON
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The MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR.

While it is, without doubt, important and desirable that the farmers selling wheat should know what that wheat is worth at Port Arthur afloat, as a matter of fact, the only way in which that could be brought about is by making some kind of amicable arrangement with the railway companies who have the telegraph lines, to furnish it.

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CON

William James Roche

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROCHE (Marquette).

That is the way the Agricultural Committee of the legislature decided to do it-to make the request of the railway companies.

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The MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR.

Without warning, or notice, or discussion, to put a statutory obligation on the railway companies would not be so advantageous, I should think, as for the department to try to make an amicable arrangement with the companies. My impression is that there would be no great difficulty about it, but, of course, I cannot speak with certainty. But my hon. friend will see that it would be much better to make the attempt, because if the railway companies desire to do it, they have the facilities, hav-iug both the means of communication and a staff of officers to post up the informa-

tion. But, if you make it obligatory by statute, you do two tilings. In the first place, you are to a certain extent, making yourself responsible for the correctness of the prices quoted, which is not altogether a satisfactory thing to do. The hon. gentleman knows that, on the street in Winnipeg you may meet a man who will say :

I will give you so much for wheat, and five minutes after he might be willing to give you two cents more. Under such circumstances, who is to say what the price really is at Port Arthur. The only thing you can do is to give it as nearly as possible, and it will be much more satisfactory if that were done under an amicable arrangement with all parties than under a statute which, the railway companies would naturally feel, imposed upon them a duty which it was difficult to perform. 1 think it would be better for the department first to attempt to work out the' arrangement with the railway companies than to make it statutory.

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May 9, 1902