May 21, 1901

CON
LIB
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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

No, he is following his private avocations now.

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CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

Do these two items of $9,500 each represent the new temporary employees ?

The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS, No, there are some increases of salary. Mr. Routhier, the assistant architect, has had his salary increased by $500. Those men are often obliged to work at night.

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CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

Would it not be better to give reasonable salaries at once instead of increasing them every year ?

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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

I did not know these officers when I took office, as I do now. When you have appreciated a man and know his work and give him an increase of salary, you encourage him. Mr. Routhier is a relatively young

man, sober, active and trustworthy.

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CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MONK.

It seems to me improvident to make these men depend upon a yearly vote for the remuneration of their services. Would it not be better to fix their salaries instead of leaving them doubtful every year ?

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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

So far as the heads of departments are concerned, it would be better to provide a large salary. The fixed salary of the chief engineer is $3,200. Mr. Lafleur only receives $3,000, although doing good work. He is

able, sober, active and always ready. I am afraid he is not paid enough. My views may not be shared by everybody, but I feel that the good men are not paid as they ought to be. My hon. friend knows that in Montreal we could not get a first-class engineer for that amount of money.

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CON
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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

No.

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CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. HAGGART.

That has been the practice of all governments in Canada-to pay the men engaged on this 'scientific branch pretty fair wages, but without superannuation, and with the understanding that they are liable to dismissal at any time. It was thought that in that way we could get the most efficient people.

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LIB

Byron Moffatt Britton

Liberal

Mr. BRITTON.

Has the minister had time to consider the case of Mr. Johnston, the military college engineer who died ? I see that no provision is made here for a gratuity. Also, has he had time to consider the case of the architect, Mr. New-Iands, to which I called attention some days ago ?

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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

I regret to be obliged to say that I have not yet had time to consider these cases,

bnt they will be taken *Up as soon as possible.

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CON

Frederick Debartzch Monk

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hr. MONK.

Under these two items, does the hon. minister employ extra or temporary officers, and where does he get them ?

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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

Temporary, In a way. Most of them are professional men-architects, engineers or draughtsmen. By the way, if I could find some good draughtsmen, I should be glad.

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CON
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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

Yes.

Public Works-Chargeable to Income-Chief Engineer's Office-Salaries of draughtsmen and clerks, notwithstanding anything in the Civil Service Act, $9,500.

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CON

Nathaniel Clarke Wallace

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WALLACE.

The minister was going to give us an explanation about this office. What amount was in the main estimates ?

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The MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS.

In the main estimates there was an amount of $49,000, covering the salaries of resident engineers all over Canada.

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CON

Nathaniel Clarke Wallace

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WALLACE.

I think the statement presented in the estimates is a very misleading one. It does not show that under these three heads of temporary assistants, chief architect's office and chief engineer's office, there are increases of salaries, wholesale increases. So, of course, we have no means of judging whether the increases are justifiable or not. But, one thing is clear, increases ought to follow some certain rule. In the main estimates, the amount voted for temporary clerical and other assistance was $25,000. and here, under these estimates, we have an additional amount of $11,000, making a total of $30,000. For the chief architect's office, the amount in the main estimates was $22,700, and now we have an addition of $9,500, or a total of $32,200. For the chief engineer's office, we voted, in the main estimates, $49,000, and here is an increase of $9,500, making a total of $58,500. That is to say, for the temporary assistance, engineering staff and architect's staff, we are voting a total of $126,700. For these three services we voted in the main estimates $96,000, and now we are adding over $30,000. This is on a par with the extravagant and wasteful expenditure of the government in every department of the public service. For clerical engineering and architect's staff, last year, we voted salaries of $96,700, which we may safely assume was a large increase over former years. And now we are adding over $30,000.

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May 21, 1901