March 26, 1901

FJRST READING.


Bill (No. 95) respecting the Ontario, Hudson's Bay and Western Railway Company.-Mr. Dyment.


DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT AMENDMENT.

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Mr. W. B.@

NORTHRUP (East Hastings) moved for leave to introduce Bill (No. 96) to amend the Dominion Elections Aot, 1900. He said : Mr. Speaker, in the election law

as it stands, clause 108, provision is made for the punishment of any person who secures a seat by inducing a candidate to withdraw from the nomination already offered by the promise of an office or employment of any kind. Whether by an oversight. or otherwise, there is no provision in the Act as it stands to prevent the purchase of a seat by inducing a candidate who has already accepted a nomination to withdraw in consideration of a promise of money.

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IND

Jabel Robinson

Independent

Mr. ROBINSON (West Elgin).

The object of the Bill is to make the prolusion in regard to bribery the same touching the securing of a seat by inducing a candidate to withdraw as it is defined in regard to other eases. This Bill is merely to amend the law to that effect.

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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


REPORT PRESENTED.


List of shareholders of the chartered banks of the Dominion of Canada, to the 31st December, 1900.-Hon. W. S. Fielding.


INQUIRY FOR RETURN.

CON

Edward Frederick Clarke

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. F. CLARKE (West Toronto).

Mr. Speaker, before the Orders of the Day are called, I desire to call the attention of the House to what seems to be the non-compliance with an order of the House, made on the 18th February, respecting the bringing down of all papers, telegrams, Ac., respecting the pay of the men of ' C ' Battery Canadian Artillery, which served in South Africa. On pages 5 and 6 of the return which has been brought down is to be found a report from Col. J. A. G. Hudon, commanding ' C ' Battery, dated 25th January, 1901. The commanding officer in this report goes on to say, that :

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General Sir F.

Carrington, commanding the Rhodesian field force, was of the opinion that all corps under his command should receive equal rates of pay, and recommended to the War Office that ' C ' Battery should receive the Rhodesian rates. Early in October I received official information from the paymaster of the Rhodesian force that War Office authority had been received for ' C ' Battery to be paid from the date of their departure from Beira on the 14th of April to the date of disembarkation in Canada. . . .

The correspondence on the subject is in the battery store wagon, which has not yet arrived from Halifax.

It is of the utmost importance, Mr. Speaker, that this return should include the correspondence to which the commanding-officer refers. It is important for us to ascertain the nature of the correspondence which took place between the officer commanding the battery and the general officer in command of the force. My motion was wide enough to cover this correspondence, and I ask if it is the intention of the government to have it brought down. The commanding officer wrote on January 25 that the wagon containing the official archives of the battery had not yet arrived from Halifax. and as two months have elapsed since that time, we may reasonably assume that the wagon with the correspondence has reached headquarters. The correspondence referred to by the commanding officer should be laid before the House at the earliest possible moment.

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The PRIME MINISTER (Right Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier).

I am sorry the hon. the

Minister of Militia is not in his seat at this moment, but I will call his attention to the matter as soon as he comes in.

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WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET.


House resumed adjourned debate on the proposed motion of Hon. Mr. Fielding : That Mr. Speaker do now leave the Chair for the House to go into committee to consider of the Ways and Means for raising the Supply to be granted to His Majesty; and the proposed motion of Mr. Borden (Halifax) in amendment thereto.


L-C

Edward Hackett

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. EDWARD HACKETT (West Prince, P.E.I.).

Mr. Speaker, in rising to make a few observations on the question now being discussed by the House, I desire to say that it is not my intention to speak at any length. I am thankful indeed that the right lion, the leader of the government so kindly consented to the adjournment of the House last night. I think his intention was to go on for some time longer, but he courteously consented to the adjournment, and instead of forcing me to speak last night, gave me an opportunity of addressing the House this afternoon. I believe, Mr. Speaker, that the question under discussion now is chiefly : Protection to the industries of Canada. I had the honour of being a member of this House in 1879, when Sir Deonara 'Tilley introduced into the parliament of Canada the national policy. That policy was for the purpose of giving protection to all the industries in Canada ; protection to the farmers, to the fishermen, to the manufacturers, to the miners, to the lumbermen, and to nil classes of our population. I need scarcely say that that policy met strong opposition from the hon. gentlemen who now occupy the Treasury benches, but who were then sitting on this side of the House. We have on record that the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Hon. Sir Richard Cartwright) made very strong speeches against the national policy at that date. He said it was blue ruin to the country, and he called it legalized robbery. We find also that his colleague, the Minister of Marine and Fisheries (Hon. Sir Louis Davies), who comes from the province of Prince Edward Island, said that the system of protection to Canadian industries was accursed of God and man.

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Some hon. MEMBERS

Oh !

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L-C

Edward Hackett

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HACKETT.

Yet, Sir, we find that that fiscal system has been supported by the people of Canada from that date to the present, that under that system Canada has gone on and prospered, that her industries have flourished, and that to-day the government of the country, although they pretend to be a free trade or revenue tariff government, are bound to sustain that underlying principle in their tariff of protection to Canadian industries. Sir, if this government had fulfilled their pledges ; if they had repealed

the protective tariff of the Conservatives, they would not be in a position to-day to tell us that Canada was flourishing and prosperous. But, because they retained the principle of protection to the industries of Canada, the Minister of Finance was able to bring down a budget speech congratulating the country on its splendid financial position. Mr. Speaker, there is one thing we want in this country, and that is, honest government. I care not what party be in power, whether it be Liberal or Conservative or Independent, we want that party to be honest, and to carry out, as far as possible, the pledges they made to the people. There are two gentlemen who sit on this side of the House, but who are classed as Independents, and we heard them last night rebuke the government for not carrying out their pledges to the people of the country to reduce the expenditure by several million dollars a year, and to reduce the tariff ; but, still these gentlemen told us that they were going to vote against the amendment of the leader of the opposition. How can we have honest government in this country unless the Independent members, and indeed the supporters of the government themselves, demonstrate that they are opposed to conduct which tends to lower the standard of honesty and integrity in the government of this country. I listened to the hon. gentleman from , Lisgar (Mr. Richardson) with a great deal of pleasure, because he made a very pleasing address, but he told us that while he was opposed to protection, while he believed that this government had not carried out its pledges; while he knew that the Minister of Customs (Hon. Mr. Paterson), especially in addressing a meeting in Manitoba, had gone back on his promises and pledges, yet, in face of all that, he announced that ho would vote with the government on this occasion. Sir, it is lowering the tone of public opinion in this country for gentlemen such as the hon. member to .announce their support of a government who have not fulfilled their pledges, and who are masquerading in the stolen clothes of the late Conservative government.

Now, Sir, I want to say a word in reference to the hon. gentleman from King's, P.E.I., (Mr. Hughes), who spoke last night. The hon. gentleman (Mr. Hughes) made his debut in parliament, and he acquitted himself in a creditable manner, and comirig from the same province as I do, although we are opposed in politics, I must give my hon. friend credit for delivering a very fail-speech. But, the hon. gentleman (Mr. Hughes) was not correct in his facts. His speech sounded all right, but when you came to sift it, you found that he >vas quite astray in his conclusions. He said :

Some members from the great province of Ontario have asked us what this government have done for the farmers: what they have done to find better markets for the products of this

country. Now, Sir, allow me to read some figures which will show what was done for the farmers of this country under the present administration.

Then, the hon. gentleman (Mr. Hughes) went on to show that our exports of hutter, cheese, eggs, bacon, ham, animals and their products, apples, fruit, wheat, flour, &c., had increased from $109,915,000 In 1896, to $170,000,000 in 1900. He said that this government have increased those exports. Will the hon. gentleman pretend to say that It was this government that caused this great increase in the exports of the country ? Does he pretend to say that because we had fine weather, because the rain fell and the sun shone and the crops were abundant, this government did it ? Does the hon. gentleman pretend to say that anything that was done by this government in any way assisted the industrious, Intelligent people of Canada thus to increase their products ? Sir, it was due to the energy, the enterprise, the Industry of the people themselves, and not to this government.

I want to refer briefly to the cheese industry of the province of Prince Edward Island, which has grown largely within the last few years. Who established that industry there ? The late Conservative government. They sent Prof. Robertson down there, when there was only one small cheese factory on the island, and encouraged the farmers to start more factories ; but he was very coolly received by gentlemen who are now sitting on the Treasury benches. That industry is now prospering and flourishing to such an extent that in the year 1900 the farmers of Prince Edward Island were able to export $600,000 worth of dairy products, owing to what was done by the Conservative government, while nothing has been done by this government.

We in Prince Edward Island desire to have the means of transporting our products to the markets of the old world. We have been insisting on having cold.storage provided ; but this government has done nothing for us in that direction. A day or two ago I asked the hon. Minister of Agriculture what he was doing in that connection, and he said the matter was now being negotiated. We have had this government in power now four or five years. When these gentlemen were in opposition they promised us cold storage. The system was introduced into this country by Dr. Montague, a late member of this House. The Minister of Marine and Fisheries, when canvassing the votes of the people for his candidates in Prince Edward Island, said, Return me to power, and you will have cold storage for the shipment of your products to the markets of the old world. But we have no cold storage. One year a steamer called at Charlottetown. Another year an old hulk called the Gaspesia, which had no oold storage accommodation, called there. For the last two years none have called. We have.

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L-C

Edward Hackett

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HACKETT.

been told that in 1899 this was due to the Ameriean-Spanish war, which caused a great demand for steamships, and it was impossible to provide one to carry the products of Prince Edward Island to the markets of Great Britain. We were told last year that it was owing to the great demand for steamships on account of the South African war. This year up to this time the Minister of Agriculture (Hon. Mr. Fisher) says the matter is being negotiated. Sir, I would ask the hon. member for King's, P.E.I. (Mr. Hughes), to insist that the minister whom he follows so slavishly shall provide some accommodation for the farmers of Prince Edward Island.

Now, if there is one thing more than another for which the farmers of Prince Edward Island feel aggrieved, it is because this government has allowed American corn to come into the country free of duty. The growers of coarse grains, who have a large quantity for sale each year, find American corn coming in to compete with their products, which they have, in consequence, to sell at reduced prices. This is what this government have done for the people of Canada, especially for the farmers of Prince Edward Island.

Now, having said so much with regard to my hon. friend from King's, I want for one moment to refer to what was said a few nights ago by the hon. member for Alberta (Mr. Oliver). He made a very pleasing address. He discredited Ontario and the eastern provinces. He said, we in the west are the people-it is to the great west we must look for the future of Canada. He said that the exports of this country were largely made up from he products of Manitoba and the North-west Territories. This was a sectional cry. It was only intended for the hon. gentleman's constituents, and was not what ought to have been said in this House. We know that there is in that western country an area of the most fertile and valuable lands in the world : and we know that its immense possibilities remained closed to the people of Canada until the Conservative party built a railway and opened up that great country. If that country has such advantages that it is able to compete with and discount Ontario. Quebec and the maritime provinces, it is because of the action of the late Conservative government led by Sir John Macdonald and having as his Minister of Railways, Sir Charles Tupper.

Another hon. gentleman who delivered a very pleasing address the other evening was the hon. member (Mr. Wade) who comes from the far-famed valley of Annapolis and represents that district. He spoke at great length, and he spoke principally of apples. W~e know that in the Province of Nova Scotia from the far-famed valley of Annapolis and the home of Evangeline, are produced the finest apples to be found in the world. We know that the people there are not afraid

to compete with any other people, not only in Canada, hut in any part of the United States. But what did the hon. gentleman say ? Not satisfied with the advantages of his beautiful valley, which will be blossoming in a few weeks, spreading its fragrance around, he attacked the leader of the opposition, saying : These gentlemen fear Ontario, as they have a right to fear it, because the intelligent people of Ontario are rising in their might against them. The hon. member said to the hon. leader of the opposition that the only way you could protect the farmers of Nova Scotia was to prevent the farmers of Ontario slaughtering their products in the markets of Nova Scotia. I would ask the hon. gentleman if he is now in his seat, what product of Ontario has been slaughtered in the markets of Nova Scotia. The hon. gentleman is not present.

Hon. Mr. ROSS (Victoria, N.S.) Butter, for one thing, pork for another.

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L-C

Edward Hackett

Liberal-Conservative

Mr. HACKETT.

With the best grazing lands in the maritime provinces in the district which my hon. friend comes from, need the farmers there be afraid of competition from the farmers of Ontario in the making of butter or beef ? Is that the only article ?

Hon. Mr. ROSS (Victoria, N.S.) No.

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March 26, 1901